Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 3rd Mar 2009 22:44 UTC
Internet & Networking Conventional wisdom has it that Mosaic was the first graphical web browser. Even though Mosaic - the basis for Netscape - certainly kickstarted the web revolution, it wasn't the first graphical web browser at all - that honour goes to Erwise, developed by four Finnish college students in 1991. It was more advanced than Mosaic, ran on the X Window System, but didn't catch on in the end. The four developers recently gave an interview detailing Erwise and its history.
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Minor HTML glitch
by lubod on Tue 3rd Mar 2009 23:18 UTC
lubod
Member since:
2009-02-02

Link typo:

a hef=...</a

should be:

a href=...</a

For anyone interested, the address the link would take you to, if working (all one line):

http://www.xconomy.com/national/2009/03/03/the-greatest-internet-pi...

Reply Score: 3

nice
by stooovie on Tue 3rd Mar 2009 23:28 UTC
stooovie
Member since:
2006-01-25

Wow, I love these history lessons. We've come a long way, but not really. It's still a matter of clicking into a window full of text. But ignore me, I have just finished a paper on new media, interfaces and mediation ;)

Reply Score: 3

RE: nice
by Doc Pain on Wed 4th Mar 2009 13:33 UTC in reply to "nice"
Doc Pain Member since:
2006-10-08

It's worth knowing where all the stuff we take for granted today originally came from. Especially in IT these "history lessons", which I often consider basic knowledge, are a good chance to invest some time to learn something new. As usual, it's possible to see that several concepts that the oh so clever marketing guys present to the public as "all new", "just invented" or "milestone" often have already been around for a while.

Reply Score: 4

netscape?
by smashIt on Tue 3rd Mar 2009 23:57 UTC
smashIt
Member since:
2005-07-06

Even though Mosaic - the basis for Netscape


i thought ie is based in mosaic, not netscape

Reply Score: 3

RE: netscape?
by nonesuch on Wed 4th Mar 2009 02:06 UTC in reply to "netscape?"
nonesuch Member since:
2007-11-13

Proudly presenting: The Not Trolling response!

Marc Andreessen was one of the original developers of Mosaic, and was funded by Jim Clark (SGI) to develop Mosaic into Netscape. In fact, Netscape Navigator 1.0 was little more than a rebranded NCSA Mosaic. Same code base.

Spyglass, Inc. was founded by NCSA to commercialize NCSA stuff. They developed their own "fork" of Mosaic. Microsoft licensed Spyglass Mosaic to create Internet Explorer. In fact, Internet Explorer 1.0 was little more than a rebranded Spyglass Mosaic. Same code base.

In a roundabout sort of way, both IE and Netscape were based on the original NCSA Mosaic. Of course, by a few versions later, there was probably very little of the original code left, as evidenced by the horrible incompatibility of Netscape and IE all through the 90s.

Reply Score: 8

RE[2]: netscape?
by WorknMan on Wed 4th Mar 2009 04:40 UTC in reply to "RE: netscape?"
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

Marc Andreessen was one of the original developers of Mosaic, and was funded by Jim Clark (SGI) to develop Mosaic into Netscape. In fact, Netscape Navigator 1.0 was little more than a rebranded NCSA Mosaic. Same code base.


And before Netscape Navigator hit 1.0, it was called 'Mosaic Netscape'. When I worked at an ISP way back when, we used to give customers a couple of floppies that included Trumpet Winsock for Win3.1 and the 0.9 version of Mosaic Netscape. You can even see a screenshot of it in the Wikipedia Netscape article:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Netscape_Navigator

Reply Score: 4

WorldWideWeb
by nonesuch on Wed 4th Mar 2009 01:41 UTC
nonesuch
Member since:
2007-11-13

It should probably be pointed out that the world's very first web browser, the browser that Tim Berners-Lee created the WWW on, was called WorldWideWeb, and was graphical. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WorldWideWeb) It was, however, available only on NeXT computers, and was virtually unknown to the public. Apparently even to this day, if articles like this are still getting published.

Edited 2009-03-04 01:43 UTC

Reply Score: 19

Depressing?
by AmiKit on Wed 4th Mar 2009 11:15 UTC
AmiKit
Member since:
2006-09-10

While I obviously hope she gets where she wants to go, it did make me wonder just how much talent and how many good ideas are wasted because there is no rich family, no investors, no good ol' luck.

Depressing.


Not at all. What about counter question: "How many good ideas were not even born because its potential medium (human being) was rich enough and had no need for any vision?"

A good example is Sablikova, a speedskater. There's no speedskater stadium or any other suitable facility in Czech Republic. She was forced to train her style on some kind of modified door, somehow. Really, classic wooden door! Maybe thanks to this insufficient conditions, support and whatever, her dream and need for achievement was even stronger.. at the end she won gold medal in Nagano and other high appraised events. On top of that, she introduced a new technique in speedskatering which is now imitating by others. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sablikova

Reply Score: 3

RE: Depressing?
by Ford Prefect on Wed 4th Mar 2009 12:32 UTC in reply to "Depressing?"
Ford Prefect Member since:
2006-01-16

How can you train speed skating on a door? Must be a very long door then...

As I heard if you don't have a stadium you have to wait for winter and go on the next lake.

I guess that's what she probably did.


Still you are right: Challenges are important for humans. Some of the greatest achievments were made by people facing tough challenges.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Depressing?
by AmiKit on Wed 4th Mar 2009 14:27 UTC in reply to "RE: Depressing?"
AmiKit Member since:
2006-09-10

How can you train speed skating on a door? Must be a very long door then...

As I heard if you don't have a stadium you have to wait for winter and go on the next lake.

I would say she used the door to train the technique during summertime. I was surprised too when I heard it for the first time :-)

Reply Score: 1

RE: Depressing?
by Laurence on Wed 4th Mar 2009 12:47 UTC in reply to "Depressing?"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

She was forced to train her style on some kind of modified door, somehow. Really, classic wooden door!


Speed skating on a wooden door?
You sure you got your information right?

Even the wikipedia article you linked threw up no results when I searched for the text 'door' or 'wood'.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Depressing?
by siride on Wed 4th Mar 2009 13:59 UTC in reply to "RE: Depressing?"
siride Member since:
2006-01-02

I'm guessing they may have meant "floor" instead of "door".

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Depressing?
by AmiKit on Wed 4th Mar 2009 14:29 UTC in reply to "RE: Depressing?"
AmiKit Member since:
2006-09-10

Yes, the door. Can't imagine it either but I would guess she trained her technique on it.

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: Depressing?
by Laurence on Wed 4th Mar 2009 16:02 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Depressing?"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

Yes, the door. Can't imagine it either but I would guess she trained her technique on it.


Sorry, but I still can't find any reference of this on the internet. All the sites Google throws up state she trained abroad.

Where did you read / hear about this?

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Depressing?
by Thom_Holwerda on Wed 4th Mar 2009 16:03 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Depressing?"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

Yes, the door. Can't imagine it either but I would guess she trained her technique on it.


I've done semi-professional speed-skating for 4-5 years. Busy right now, but will explain later ;) .

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Depressing?
by Morty on Wed 4th Mar 2009 18:44 UTC in reply to "RE: Depressing?"
Morty Member since:
2005-07-06

Speed skating on a wooden door?


Creative to use a door, but the dimensions are about right so why not :-)

Take a plain door with smooth paint or varnish surface, put it flat on the floor. Nail two two-by-fours on top of each other along the top and bottom edges of the door. Put on some socks giving you low friction to the door surface. Stand sideways on the door, and use your legs to push you from one two-by-four side to the other. You have now an easy way to simulate the skating motion.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Depressing?
by MamiyaOtaru on Thu 5th Mar 2009 01:28 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Depressing?"
MamiyaOtaru Member since:
2005-11-11

Finally someone with a clue instead of the endless "a door is too small to skate on" comments ;)

It would work like the thing on the right side of this page: http://www.rosiewear.com/training_tools.shtml

A door would be a cheaper way to do the same thing, and not a bad idea if it's what you are stuck with.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Depressing?
by Laurence on Thu 5th Mar 2009 08:33 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Depressing?"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

Ahhh. Now it all makes sense.
I know this thread has gone somewhat off topic, but I for one enjoyed reading about this.

Thank you

MamiyaOtaru:
I found your opening sentence a little trolling.
I think you'll find that myself and the others who commented "a door is too small to skate on" only did so enquiring how the door was used rather than boasting any kind of knowledge on the subject (as you seemed to suggest we were).
So it's not all that surprising our posts were clueless given the whole point of our posts were to establish the use of the door!

Reply Score: 2

Hmm
by judgen on Wed 4th Mar 2009 18:25 UTC
judgen
Member since:
2006-07-12

I thought Nexus (previously known as WorldWideWeb) was the first browser. As the first release of Erwise was 1992 actually and Nexus was released for NeXT machines in end of year 1991. But i might have learned it wrongly.

Update:
" The first successful build (of Nexus) was completed on Christmas Day, 1990" and Erwise was released on April 1992.

Edited 2009-03-04 18:27 UTC

Reply Score: 2

I think they are wrong
by jefro on Wed 4th Mar 2009 21:49 UTC
jefro
Member since:
2007-04-13

Pretty sure a Xerox machine really did have the first graphical browser, along with mouse and graphic's tablet. It did browse the corporate lan at that time, there was no internet.

Reply Score: 1

RE: I think they are wrong
by iain.dalton on Wed 4th Mar 2009 22:20 UTC in reply to "I think they are wrong"
iain.dalton Member since:
2006-02-28

Nexus/WorldWideWeb was the first Web Browser, but the first browser might have been Project Xanadu or NLS. I'm no historian, but NLS was shown in Engelbart's demo where he introduced the mouse, so it would probably be the first graphical browser.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: I think they are wrong
by Manuel FLURY on Thu 5th Mar 2009 09:46 UTC in reply to "RE: I think they are wrong"
Manuel FLURY Member since:
2005-07-05

This one : http://xanadu.com/tech/ ?

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: I think they are wrong
by iain.dalton on Thu 5th Mar 2009 09:49 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: I think they are wrong"
iain.dalton Member since:
2006-02-28

That looks like it.

Reply Score: 1

RE: I think they are wrong
by Verenkeitin on Sat 7th Mar 2009 14:16 UTC in reply to "I think they are wrong"
Verenkeitin Member since:
2007-07-01

Browser as in Internet browser, so browsing local filesystem etc. does not count.

Reply Score: 1

Da Vinci beat them allI thought
by Manuel FLURY on Thu 5th Mar 2009 09:13 UTC
Manuel FLURY
Member since:
2005-07-05

I thought that Da Vinci invented the very very very first Web Browser (called vvvFWB ) between 1517 and 1518 a few days after having drafted the World Wide web itself ...

^^

Edited 2009-03-05 09:15 UTC

Reply Score: 2

This myth is debunked!
by Shannara on Fri 6th Mar 2009 19:06 UTC
Shannara
Member since:
2005-07-06

The myth about this being the worlds first graphical browser was debunked on slashdot ...

Reply Score: 1