Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 26th Jul 2005 17:45 UTC, submitted by improvedsource
Fedora Core Everyone wants a quick boot time, from the beginner user to the advanced user, this is a issue that bothers us all. As Linux has advanced it has increasingly become slower to boot. So I decided to look into reducing the time it takes to boot my current setup, which is Fedora 4. In doing so I was able to reduce the boot time of my Fedora 4 installation to less than 25 seconds.
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link
by Anonymous on Tue 26th Jul 2005 17:57 UTC
Anonymous
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so uhhh where's the link?

Reply Score: 2

ummmm
by Anonymous on Tue 26th Jul 2005 17:59 UTC
Anonymous
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It boots so fast, he can't even post a link!

Reply Score: 2

Link?
by Anonymous on Tue 26th Jul 2005 18:08 UTC
Anonymous
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Good for you... now is there an article to read or is this just posted for bragging rights?

BTW: if you're really looking to speed up boot time, the problem is with the lazy outdated init system. Fortunately a much more advanced and much quicker replacement is being developed: http://freshmeat.net/projects/nextgenerationinit/?branch_id=57943&r...

Reply Score: 0

RE: Link?
by Thom_Holwerda on Tue 26th Jul 2005 18:17 UTC in reply to "Link?"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

Good for you... now is there an article to read or is this just posted for bragging rights?

Don't get your panties in a twist, I just forgot to add the link.

Reply Score: 5

RE: Link?
by renox on Tue 26th Jul 2005 18:44 UTC in reply to "Link?"
renox Member since:
2005-07-06

Somehow as KDE or Gnome takes more time to start by themselves than BeOS did to boot the OS + start the desktop (on slower hardware), I doubt that a better init system is enough to have a really fast boot (desktop included) on Linux..

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Link?
by Anonymous on Tue 26th Jul 2005 21:21 UTC in reply to "RE: Link?"
Anonymous Member since:
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Somehow as KDE or Gnome takes more time to start by themselves than BeOS did to boot the OS + start the desktop (on slower hardware), I doubt that a better init system is enough to have a really fast boot (desktop included) on Linux..

It's a good thing that BeOS is still a portable, and viable operating system. I, for one, can't wait for the next release!

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: Link?
by renox on Wed 27th Jul 2005 20:43 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Link?"
renox Member since:
2005-07-06

Of course your right,that BeOS is mostly dead.

But I 'm just not very impressed that he managed to configure Linux to boot in 25s to get only to the login screen whereas BeOS did boot in 14s up to the full desktop with the default BeOS setup (no tweaking, I'm sure some BeOS guru could have reduced boot time).

And 25s with a much more powerful computer! And KDE or Gnome take quite some time to start, 'quick boot' indeed!

Reply Score: 1

skills
by Anonymous on Tue 26th Jul 2005 18:10 UTC
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indeed

Reply Score: 0

link
by Anonymous on Tue 26th Jul 2005 18:12 UTC
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lxer.com
by Anonymous on Tue 26th Jul 2005 18:14 UTC
Anonymous
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the story is on lxer.com

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Apparently,
by Anonymous on Tue 26th Jul 2005 18:17 UTC
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Thom didnt mean at all to tell us HOW he achieved that, just wanted us to know about the fact :-)

Well, I guess he just disabled some unneeded services and set (g|k)dm to start as early as possible without compromising desktop functionality. Still it's a bit hackish: in a desktop configuration, the system must be setup like this out of the box. The user shouldn't have to fiddle with services.

Reply Score: 0

raid0
by Anonymous on Tue 26th Jul 2005 18:43 UTC
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RAID0 does improve more than all the hacks:-)

Reply Score: 0

initng
by subterrific on Tue 26th Jul 2005 19:02 UTC
subterrific
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2005-07-10

initng gets ubuntu hoary boot to gdm login screen around 20 seconds (the images show the slowest boot i recorded). the differences in the bootchart's are dramatic.

http://illadvised.com/~jason/bootchart-hoary-default.png
http://illadvised.com/~jason/bootchart-hoary-initng.png

that was with a really quick and dirty port of the sysvinit scripts. it could probably get down to 10 seconds with more work. initng has also gotten faster since i ran these tests by embedding shell parsers (instead of spawning /bin/bash processes) and using faster shells such as dash and ash.

Reply Score: 5

Link down?
by Anonymous on Tue 26th Jul 2005 19:24 UTC
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Has the site been osnewsed?

Reply Score: 0

I see his problem....
by Anonymous on Tue 26th Jul 2005 21:52 UTC
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My initial setup was pretty much standard Fedora 4 with nvidia driver loaded. My PCs hardware is an Athlon63 3000+, 1GB RAM, 80GB SATA 7200 rpm hard drive, and Nvidia Video Card.

He needs to upgrade to an Athlon 64!

Reply Score: 0

Anonymous
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Fedora contains the experimental Early-login support.

On my Pentium 3 667mhz, 192 RAM It takes 30 seconds to boot (after the bios and grub OS select screen) including login.

And that's without the init.d work that is being planned for the future!

All you need to do is:

change the chkconfig: line in /etc/init.d/xfs to
# chkconfig: 2345 08 97

and also change the chkconfig: line in etc/init.d/syslog to
# chkconfig: 2345 07 98

and then in the terminal run
/sbin/chkconfig xfs on
/sbin/chkconfig syslog on
/sbin/chkconfig --add gdm-early-login
/sbin/chkconfig --add gdm-allow-login
/sbin/chkconfig gdm-early-login on
/sbin/chkconfig gdm-allow-login on
to regenerate the symlinks in /etc/rc5.d

Lastly in grub entry replace rhgb with early login.

Et Viola, super fast startup. And that is without messing with any service settings!

Reply Score: 0

Yada
by Anonymous on Tue 26th Jul 2005 23:27 UTC
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My Arch Linux box boots in about 20 seconds. Always has. I'm not trying to sell you on Arch, but I'm just saying that Linux can boot fast for sure.

Reply Score: 0

what's the big deal about boot time
by re_re on Tue 26th Jul 2005 23:39 UTC
re_re
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2005-07-06

why does it really make a difference how long it takes to boot a linux system... it's not like windows where you have to reboot every time you install software or change major settings.

besides... i think most linux users leave there computers on for long periods of time anyway

Reply Score: 1

Anonymous Member since:
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Um... laptops?

Reply Score: 0

oh yeah.... just timed it on this one
by re_re on Tue 26th Jul 2005 23:47 UTC
re_re
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2005-07-06

19 seconds to shell login, an grand total of 35 seconds to gdm login .... and that's loging in and starting gdm manually

Reply Score: 1

heh..... yeah
by re_re on Wed 27th Jul 2005 00:14 UTC
re_re
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2005-07-06

forgot about laptops lol

Reply Score: 1

Anonymous
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Let's see. I don't use my computer while out of the house or while sleeping. If I had a proper job, that would amount to at least 16 hours per day. Why boost my energy bill?

Computers generate a lot of heat. If you have a small office, then the heat can become unbearable during the summer months. The only way to overcome that problem is to pay more for electricity for air conditioning, or turn off the computer when it is unused.

If the computers are in a common use area, the fans get annoying. This is particularly true for those who haven't reached geek enlightenment.

Reply Score: 0

damunzy Member since:
2005-07-26

"If the computers are in a common use area, the fans get annoying. This is particularly true for those who haven't reached geek enlightenment."

I think the fact that people haven't reached 'geek enlightenment' is the true problem...
;)

Reply Score: 1

Anonymous Member since:
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Hrm... too bad you haven't figured out how to use your computer while away. Logging in from work to download various papers (I scan everything), to grab a song I want to hear, to push somthing home that I want to look at further when I get home, etc, etc, etc sure is nice! Don't know what I'd do without SFTP! I don't keep personal files at work anymore!

Reply Score: 0

Anonymous Member since:
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Of course I can use my computer while I'm away from home, but the question is usually why? I'm supposed to be in front of people expounding the wonders of science while at work, not twiddling with a mouse.

Even whilr on vacation, I don't need to have the computer on 24/7. The BIOS is set to power it up in the morning, and I shut it down at night.

Finally, the critical stuff is stored on a server which is shared by hundreds of people. I don't even have to feel guilty about leaving an unused system running, because that server is always in use.

Reply Score: 0

Hmm...
by Anonymous on Wed 27th Jul 2005 08:03 UTC
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I heard a new init is on development and is going to be very fast, Well... cool, It will be cool if those guys do a *fast* and *simple* rc's scripts too, for the new init, and will be cool if distros start using that, I heard the problem with speed is the old sysvinit and the distros that put too much process on the boot, So... I think that would be a good idea

Reply Score: 0

GUI
by Anonymous on Wed 27th Jul 2005 08:50 UTC
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nevermine the booting time how can i get the applications to start faster from the GUI.

Reply Score: 0

Hmmm
by Anonymous on Wed 27th Jul 2005 12:47 UTC
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EH?
My old super charged windows xp boot in less than 12 seconds.

Reply Score: 0

RE: Hmmm
by Anonymous on Wed 27th Jul 2005 14:23 UTC in reply to "Hmmm"
Anonymous Member since:
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EH?
My old super charged windows xp boot in less than 12 seconds.


Yeah, I did a bit of tweaking the last time I logged in. Glad you like it.

Reply Score: 0

Software suspend
by Anonymous on Wed 27th Jul 2005 14:56 UTC
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One more way to improve boot time is "Software suspend 2". I am getting about 30 sec boot time with it, which may seem slow, but after boot I have fully loaded system with all applications up and running exectly where I left them.

Reply Score: 0

Under 25 seconds is still not enough
by Jace on Wed 27th Jul 2005 16:47 UTC
Jace
Member since:
2005-07-25

Does it take more than 3 seconds to start using your CD player, DVD player, microwave, telephone (not cell!), radio, car, etc?

It takes 3 seconds(?) to do a reset on my Zodiac2. That's what we should be aiming for.

Problem is, the BIOS is still slowing things down. My own BIOS (ASUS P4C800-E) takes about 6 to 10 seconds (or infinity if my Adaptec USB hub is plugged in and powered on!), then the SCSI BIOS (2940U2W with 4 devices) takes another 6 to 10 seconds (10 seconds or more if there are CDs in the two CD drives). That's, at worst, already 12 to 20 seconds lost before the OS loader even gets a chance.

Hardware and software are too separated!! The OS should be part of the computer and should be on non-volitile memory. How old will I have to be before computers become complete appliances and not piles of workarounds and geekisms?

Reply Score: 1

Ah, the days of the Atari ST...
by Luposian on Wed 27th Jul 2005 17:29 UTC
Luposian
Member since:
2005-07-27

When you turned on your computer and the OS booted in a couple seconds out of ROM. BeOS comes in at a close second with about 15 seconds to boot to the desktop (BIOS time not included) on my 400MHz Celeron box with 64Mb of RAM.

Take out a few (unnecessary) drivers and the systems boots even faster!

My MacOS X 10.3.9 install on my 1.8GHz G4 (upgraded Digital Audio) with 1.5Gb of RAM and 80Gb 7200rmp DMA/100 Western Digital HD takes about a good 1.5 minutes to get to the desktop. That little gear thingy just spins and spins and spins... *sigh*

Reply Score: 1

RE: Ah, the days of the Atari ST...
by JLF65 on Wed 27th Jul 2005 23:45 UTC in reply to "Ah, the days of the Atari ST..."
JLF65 Member since:
2005-07-06

My MacOS X 10.3.9 install on my 1.8GHz G4 (upgraded Digital Audio) with 1.5Gb of RAM and 80Gb 7200rmp DMA/100 Western Digital HD takes about a good 1.5 minutes to get to the desktop. That little gear thingy just spins and spins and spins... *sigh*

You folks is spoiled! Why, in my day, an 020 based Mac running 7.5.5 with two full lines of extensions could take several minutes to boot. You'd turn the machine on, then go grab a cup of coffee and a danish. By the time you finished them, it would be just about ready. ;)

Reply Score: 1

Wake up
by Sphinx on Thu 28th Jul 2005 17:16 UTC
Sphinx
Member since:
2005-07-09

You already have a parallel boot system by Richard Gooch in sysutil and it boots like a rocket, from initramfs run-init to login in about 8 seconds. It's just not compiled by default. Dump sysvinit and

cd util-linux-2.12a
configure
make HAVE_KILL=yes HAVE_SLN=yes
cd login-utils
make HAVE_KILL=yes HAVE_SLN=yes all-getty all-init all-misc
make HAVE_KILL=yes HAVE_SLN=yes install-init install-getty install-misc
cd ..
make HAVE_KILL=yes HAVE_SLN=yes install

link init to simple-init and get his scripts or take mine.

Reply Score: 1