Linked by David Adams on Wed 24th Aug 2005 07:17 UTC, submitted by wakeupneo
Linux Japan's Miracle Linux Corp., China's Red Flag Software Co. and Haansoft Inc. of South Korea are teaming up to release Asianux 2.0, a Linux distribution meant to compete with Microsoft Windows in their home regions.
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Link
by Anonymous on Wed 24th Aug 2005 07:31 UTC
Anonymous
Member since:
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The link is:

http://edition.cnn.com/2005/BUSINESS/08/23/japan.linux.ap/index.htm...

I'm afraid a < is missing in the page source.

Reply Score: 1

v Yeah right!!!!!!!!
by Anonymous on Wed 24th Aug 2005 07:40 UTC
Oops
by Anonymous on Wed 24th Aug 2005 07:43 UTC
Anonymous
Member since:
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That's not <a/> ;-)

Reply Score: 0

v Re:ms rulez!!!
by Anonymous on Wed 24th Aug 2005 07:49 UTC
v Linux Zealot
by Anonymous on Wed 24th Aug 2005 11:28 UTC
Sweet!
by zombie process on Wed 24th Aug 2005 13:45 UTC
zombie process
Member since:
2005-07-08

More teamwork, more beer, less hate.

Reply Score: 1

All right
by crashback on Wed 24th Aug 2005 15:07 UTC
crashback
Member since:
2005-07-12

Good for them.

Reply Score: 1

Way to go
by Terracotta on Wed 24th Aug 2005 21:22 UTC
Terracotta
Member since:
2005-08-15

I think the only threat to m$ is not linux itself, but the asian countries. If linux can get a grip there, it might make it easier for us: since ms might have to make itself compatible with the competition if it wants market share in asia. And of course, the people there aren't that much brainwashed with the ridiculous m$ way of thinking what a gui should look like.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Way to go
by Anonymous on Thu 25th Aug 2005 01:49 UTC in reply to "Way to go"
Anonymous Member since:
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Sorry for my English, I hope my Egnlish teacher won't see my words here. :-)
>I think the only threat to m$ is not linux itself, but the asian countries.
Asian countries don't have a OS developed by themselves. That's why they choose something other than M$.
>If linux can get a grip there, it might make it easier for us: since ms might have to make itself compatible with the competition if it wants market share in asia.
Asianux 2.0 is compatible. But Its compatibility with RHEL4 makes it no different with other RH base distro. I'm just wondering why RH don't do the localization work for Asian people. the Chinese input methord and the documentation is refreshed very slowly.
>And of course, the people there aren't that much brainwashed with the ridiculous m$ way of thinking what a gui should look like.
I agree with you. But after the government (and/or any other employers) has spent tuns of money and time to train her employees to use M$ Office, they may not really want to switch to Linux right now. I think they just use Linux to bargain with M$.

Reply Score: 0

RE[2]: Way to go
by Terracotta on Thu 25th Aug 2005 09:29 UTC in reply to "RE: Way to go"
Terracotta Member since:
2005-08-15

Well, I ment for example, microsoft is going to have to be compatible with linux, instead of the other way around, because of its openess (linux openess) it's no big deal for microsoft to become compatible. But that's only going to happen once linux has a decent marketshare (for around 25% I think), and then I mean office suits and stuff like that. And I think the only place where linux can show it's mature enough is asia, because the market is still groing, people aren't that dependant on m$ there, yet. In the western countries it's a problem to change because you're making yourself incompatible with the rest, since almost everyone has a computer and hence windows or m$ office.

Reply Score: 1

v Who's Big Brother now?
by Anonymous on Thu 25th Aug 2005 00:43 UTC