Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 28th Nov 2005 10:22 UTC
SkyOS "The SkyOS service collection has been extended with a web server service. Thanks to Gareth Owen (developer of ghttpd) and Cody Mays (ported ghttpd to SkyOS) you can use SkyOS as a web server now. The web server configuration is done with the common graphical service configuration plugin for the System Manager. Using Nvu and Firefox you have great tools available to develop and maintain websites from within SkyOS." A screenshot's here. This web server and the service plugin will be made available in an update package, available via the SkyOS Software store.
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RE
by Kroc on Mon 28th Nov 2005 10:47 UTC
Kroc
Member since:
2005-11-10

Appolgies for me not knowing better here, but is such a system security as a feature, or security through obscurity? For example, SkyOS is a very little known, little used OS being written mainly by one person (!). I'm willing to believe that the OS has security flaws and that the use of SkyOS a server would be secure through the fact that it is only generally used by the people who develop it anyway.

Reply Score: 2

RE
by Anonymous on Mon 28th Nov 2005 11:00 UTC in reply to "RE"
Anonymous Member since:
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A webserver can also be handy in environments where security-matters aren't that important. Think of local servers in small intranets or offline testing environments for future web-projects.

Reply Score: 0

RE
by jayson.knight on Mon 28th Nov 2005 11:04 UTC in reply to "RE"
jayson.knight Member since:
2005-07-06

So why would you want to use SkyOS in this type of scenario over something tried and true...like Apache, or IIS?

Reply Score: 1

RE
by Anonymous on Mon 28th Nov 2005 11:10 UTC in reply to "RE"
Anonymous Member since:
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Maybe because, if You already use SkyOS, such webserver is smaller and easier to install?
Or maybe SkyOS is better then other solutions for some cases?
Try it and let us know ;)

Reply Score: 0

RE
by vasper on Mon 28th Nov 2005 11:24 UTC in reply to "RE"
vasper Member since:
2005-07-22

Because trying something new brought us from the stone age to the computer age?

Reply Score: 3

RE
by Anonymous on Mon 28th Nov 2005 12:23 UTC in reply to "RE"
Anonymous Member since:
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Because trying something new brought us from the stone age to the computer age?

Well said!

I can't believe the people here that have such a limited view...

Reply Score: 0

RE
by Anonymous on Mon 28th Nov 2005 21:57 UTC in reply to "RE"
Anonymous Member since:
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But what is new about running a web server, NVU and Firefox?

Reply Score: 0

RE
by Ronald Vos on Mon 28th Nov 2005 22:07 UTC in reply to "RE"
Ronald Vos Member since:
2005-07-06

That you can do it in an efficient, clean and malware free environment that's easy to configure, that is what's new. (At least according to most people I've heard SkyOS is this).

Reply Score: 1

RE
by Anonymous on Tue 29th Nov 2005 00:59 UTC in reply to "RE"
Anonymous Member since:
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The most obvious advantage is that since applications for SkyOS can depend on a webserver being present, they can offer rich functionality like web-based interfaces by default, without having to roll their own webserver or include a bulky package with their installer.

Reply Score: 0

RE
by Anonymous on Mon 28th Nov 2005 11:18 UTC in reply to "RE"
Anonymous Member since:
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Because you fix vulnerabilities after you get them?

Reply Score: 1

hm
by Anonymous on Mon 28th Nov 2005 11:10 UTC
Anonymous
Member since:
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its cheaper than IIS
its easier than apache/linux/bsd/whatever

Reply Score: 0

RE: hm
by Kroc on Mon 28th Nov 2005 11:24 UTC in reply to "hm"
Kroc Member since:
2005-11-10

OSX is kind of pretty easy on the webserver thing.

1. Switch on machine
2. Tick "Personal Web Sharing" in Preferences > Sharing (3 Clicks)
3. You have a working web server open to the internet.

Congratulations. Copy your HTML files to /system/webserver/documents

Reply Score: 1

RE: hm
by Anonymous on Mon 28th Nov 2005 16:55 UTC in reply to "hm"
Anonymous Member since:
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apache is easy to use once you learn how to use it.
It's also has some really awsome features, it's enterprise-grade.

Reply Score: 0

Benchmarking
by Ronald Vos on Mon 28th Nov 2005 12:47 UTC
Ronald Vos
Member since:
2005-07-06

I'd like to see some ;)

Reply Score: 1

eh...
by Anonymous on Mon 28th Nov 2005 13:06 UTC
Anonymous
Member since:
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MacOSX doesn't seem to intuitive to me, I don't want to share anything, I just want to have a webserver runing. probably a matter of taste what to call it...
what I orginally wanted to say, bluefish should be chosen over nvu, it is -way- easier. again a matter of taste but oh well..

Reply Score: 0

hmm
by Tomasz Dominikowski on Mon 28th Nov 2005 15:15 UTC
Tomasz Dominikowski
Member since:
2005-08-08

Wow, you leave for university work, come back and bang, another great feature in SkyOS. I'm afraid what might happen tomorrow ;)

Reply Score: 2

demo
by Anonymous on Mon 28th Nov 2005 16:03 UTC
Anonymous
Member since:
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is there any demo or Live CD to play a bit with this OS ?

Reply Score: 0

helf Member since:
2005-07-06

riiiight... This has been gone over a million times. Besides, it really hasn't been that 'short' of a period. v5 has been in the works for several years now.

Just for once admit that some people can be fast, decent coders without your precious F/OSS...

Reply Score: 1

TownDrunk Member since:
2005-11-28

Once you get Apple to post their changes come talk to us about SkyOS.

Reply Score: 2

PHP
by Smartpatrol on Mon 28th Nov 2005 17:00 UTC
Smartpatrol
Member since:
2005-07-06

Does it support PHP?

Reply Score: 1

RE: PHP
by Ronald Vos on Mon 28th Nov 2005 17:20 UTC in reply to "PHP"
Ronald Vos Member since:
2005-07-06

Does it support PHP?

Considering they didn't have a webserver publicly available untill yesterday, I think you can figure out the answer.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: PHP
by Sparrowhawk on Mon 28th Nov 2005 18:06 UTC in reply to "RE: PHP"
Sparrowhawk Member since:
2005-07-11

I think that the question is more along the lines "does it have the potential to support PHP?". It's a similar question to the one I erroneously posted on the SkyOS beta 9 thread.

From further reading of this webserver's homepage, it does support CGI, so in theory a PHP port could be made to allow server-side scripting. That would be nice.

Reply Score: 1

Porting guide?
by Anonymous on Mon 28th Nov 2005 17:07 UTC
Anonymous
Member since:
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Speaking of Firefox on SkyOS, What ever happened to that 30+ page porting guide that was in the works about a year ago? The SkyOS web page doesn't seem to have a link for it, nor does Google have much to say about it...

Reply Score: 0

v For godsake
by Anonymous on Mon 28th Nov 2005 19:12 UTC
slightly offtopic: Pixel
by Anonymous on Mon 28th Nov 2005 21:09 UTC
Anonymous
Member since:
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It looks like SkyOS's new graphics editor, Pixel, has a built-in "desktop" pager, of all things.. ;)

Does photoshop have one, yet?

Reply Score: 0

Hope you guys like.
by Cody Mays on Mon 28th Nov 2005 22:08 UTC
Cody Mays
Member since:
2005-11-27

I hope you people like it, it was a hassle to port, as I had to write some libc functions which were now passed upstream to Robert.

@Smartpatrol: It can once skyos has a php port, as it is cgi cabable, just like the regular ghttpd.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Hope you guys like.
by Smartpatrol on Tue 29th Nov 2005 16:19 UTC in reply to "Hope you guys like."
Smartpatrol Member since:
2005-07-06

@Smartpatrol: It can once skyos has a php port, as it is cgi cabable, just like the regular ghttpd.

Thanks! and thank you for your work. I didn't think it through i forgot that PHP would need to be ported Doh! I have been waiting for something like a webserver so that i would have a use for SkyOS I need to get in on the beta and start playing with it.

Reply Score: 1