Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 7th Feb 2006 18:37 UTC, submitted by Fusion
X11, Window Managers "Novell is announcing its contribution of the Xgl graphics subsystem and the 'Compiz' compositing manager to the X.org project. These enhancements open up a whole world of hardware acceleration, fancy animation, separating hardware resolution from software resolution, and more. As a result, Linux desktops will become more usable, end-user productivity will increase, and Linux is firmly positioned at the forefront of client computing technology." Videos and screenshots are included in the press release. And on a related note, Dan Winship of Novell has explained on gnome-desktop-devel why Novell worked on all this behind closed doors-- and this also applies to the striking similarity between Novell's mockups from December and Nat Friedman's videos. The changes made to GNOME will all be released back.
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weird
by plainstyle on Tue 7th Feb 2006 19:05 UTC
plainstyle
Member since:
2005-10-27

Novel buys the kde oriented SuSE Linux, then unveils massive enhancements to GNOME...

Reply Score: 5

RE: weird
by saterdaies on Tue 7th Feb 2006 19:14 UTC in reply to "weird"
saterdaies Member since:
2005-07-07

While Novell bought the KDE-centric SUSE, they also bought the very Gnome centric Ximian and looking at who did this work, it was the Ximian side.

Reply Score: 5

RE: weird
by werfu on Tue 7th Feb 2006 19:43 UTC in reply to "weird"
werfu Member since:
2005-09-15

"Novel buys the kde oriented SuSE Linux, then unveils massive enhancements to GNOME..."
Who cares? KDE guys have done plenty of beautiful things and KDE is much more oriented on features than simplicity. This will surely be integrated partly in the 4.0 release and than massively used in the 4.1 and you can count on the Plasma team to use it, I'm sure. Vista Areo? Pff, it will look like crap next to my KDE desktop ;)

Reply Score: 5

RE: weird
by dark child on Tue 7th Feb 2006 20:49 UTC in reply to "weird"
dark child Member since:
2005-12-09

GNOME is now more or less the default DE in Novell and Suse related distros. It seems like Novell just wanted a solid OS on which to build their enterprise Linux offering, but they don't care much about KDE. They said that KDE would still be the default in Suse but if you look at the Suse 10.1 betas GNOME is right at the top of the selection (the place that used to be occupied by KDE) during installation.

Reply Score: 4

RE[2]: weird
by Hands on Wed 8th Feb 2006 17:53 UTC in reply to "RE: weird"
Hands Member since:
2005-06-30

GNOME is more of a standard desktop within U.S. corporations because that is what Red Hat has always used and they have been the dominant distribution among enterprise customers in the U.S. Novell is aiming more at enterprise customers than they are at home customers. That's where the money is. So, it shouldn't be too much of a surprise to see them doing some serious development on GNOME.

As others have stated as well, Novell bought SUSE and Ximian. SUSE isn't only valuable because it runs KDE. SUSE is valuable because it has a solid base. Adding work from the Ximian guys and running GNOME on that base is a good move by Novell IMO.

I don't think that Novell doesn't care about KDE. It's just a matter of resources. Novell has some great GNOME resources through their aquisition of Ximian. They have a lot to contribute to GNOME, and it fits with some of their strategies. KDE has generally been more focused on features than GNOME anyway. What KDE lacks seems to be on the roadmap without the help of Novell. KDE development seems to be faster than GNOME development IMO. KDE is also in the process of changing their basic toolset. I don't blame Novell for letting people more directly involved with KDE work through some of that process.

From my perspective the work that Novell has done has either been something that brought one of the two major desktop environments more on par with the other, or it has been something that could be adopted by both.

Reply Score: 2

nice
by MamiyaOtaru on Tue 7th Feb 2006 19:05 UTC
MamiyaOtaru
Member since:
2005-11-11

Nice to see compiz out in the open. I missed it when it happened, but the changes to X itself were released around the turn of the year. All we've been waiting on is the compositing manager and changes made to gnome to make use of the new stuff. As such, not as much was closed off for not nearly as long as I thought, so kudos.

Without the stuff released today, I was able to get some stuff going in kubuntu
http://img148.imageshack.us/my.php?image=xgl7uk.png
http://img95.imageshack.us/my.php?image=xgl22bc.png
It required some command line hoop jumping though. Hopefully the new stuff will make things a bit easier to use for more people/distros.

Reply Score: 5

RE: nice
by Morty on Tue 7th Feb 2006 19:39 UTC in reply to "nice"
Morty Member since:
2005-07-06

I was able to get some stuff going in kubuntu

I see from the shots you are using Noatun, what does happen when you enable the Madness visualization plugin?

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: nice
by MamiyaOtaru on Tue 7th Feb 2006 20:21 UTC in reply to "RE: nice"
MamiyaOtaru Member since:
2005-11-11

I see from the shots you are using Noatun, what does happen when you enable the Madness visualization plugin?

heehee I had never used that plugin. Just like its description says, it moves all the windows around, and with glxcompmgr running they all wobble a little ;)

Reply Score: 2

v Novell developper Bulshit
by Moulinneuf on Tue 7th Feb 2006 19:17 UTC
RE: Novell developper Bulshit
by HeLfReZ on Tue 7th Feb 2006 19:54 UTC in reply to "Novell developper Bulshit"
HeLfReZ Member since:
2005-08-12

LOL..I think you did a fine example of showing us all why the development was done indoors. Contrary to some zealots belief, the community doesnt know it all , and can sometimes do more to harm to itself than good. If Novell wants to develop for nothing but GNOME and not KDE , if they want to develop stuff inhouse...then contribute back later, more power to them. I doubt they sent GNOME or Xorg a bill for the work they did that will benefit everyone in the community. I for one wish more of this will be done in the future. Can you imagine how long it would have taken the "community" to develop a XGL to the level they have??? We would spend 6months bickering over protocols and languages...I say KUDOS to Novell for what looks to be a job well done...And I look forward to seeing some of the changes they have made to THEIR version of GNOME make it into mainstream...

Reply Score: 5

RE[2]: Novell developper Bulshit
by Moulinneuf on Tue 7th Feb 2006 20:54 UTC in reply to "RE: Novell developper Bulshit"
Moulinneuf Member since:
2005-07-06

"I think you did a fine example of showing us all why the development was done indoors."

No , what I did whas put an objection to is nonsense , I think its clear that you disagree with me , but hey I got GNU/Linux , GNOME , XFCE , KDE , etc ... projects to fall back on , most of the time when a software development under open source is going nowhere its because of :

- Funding
- Code contribution ( lack of or really bad )
- Lack of interest from the community in the project.
- Bad Managing developper or lack of one decision maker or leading group.

"Contrary to some zealots belief, the community doesnt know it all"

The GNU/Linux community is over 250 million , you will have to change your stupid name calling one day. We got the extremely inteligent in the community too , the zealot are just the Defending machine.

" and can sometimes do more to harm to itself than good."

No as the code is Open source and availaible to all you disagree you can proove your point by a fork , Just as they did , exept there trying to push it as the new and improve XGL and X.org.

"If Novell wants to develop for nothing but GNOME and not KDE , if they want to develop stuff inhouse...then contribute back later, more power to them."

I would rather they be definative on this , so that the great KDE developper Novell as can go seek work where they get the budget and support they need.

"I doubt they sent GNOME or Xorg a bill for the work they did that will benefit everyone in the community."

You have a strange problem with reality :

http://www.dwheeler.com/sloc/ Its Novell who's working on the code and shoulder of other giants. If they where to start charging for there clients that would also be acceptable , but then SUSE when bankrupt using that method. Novell own SUSE now ... They learned that the GPL protect from Apple and Microsot a long time ago.

"I for one wish more of this will be done in the future."

Yes , I know , but your clueless about IT history.

"Can you imagine how long it would have taken the "community" to develop a XGL to the level they have??? "

Sorry to burst your Bubble 95% of the work had already been done by the community , all they did whas integration and improvement and I think removal of code , I also suspect that the budget they had whas not so small. The only thing I need to say is comeback in a year when the community as built the plug-ins and cool effects and see where it could have been now. With community involvment.

"We would spend 6months bickering over protocols and languages..."

We dont see the GNU/Linux company bickering , the only group we actually see bickering over 6 month ( actually years ) is those that contribute nothing and those that oppose GNU/Linux , the developper are quite amicable between themself , all the rest pretty much do what they whant and what they can.

"I say KUDOS to Novell for what looks to be a job well done..."

I have to second that based on the result , just you will never make me accept the message sent with it "its better to develop everything in closed development with no one else input." GNU/Linux is where its at because its exactly the opposite of whats beeing sugested.

"And I look ... make it into mainstream..."

Its not their GNOME version , no one can own GNOME , as for mainstream its all going to depend on the GNOME board and GNOME developper and the license. Frankly they whant it to be implemented by others send out the the source code on CD to other distributions and offer to help them integrate it. Not everyone as Novell Budgets and developpers.

Sorry but your bulshit mesaage that zealot have anything to do with the poor Desktop showing is just that another type of bulshit , there is Two company with 3 billion in budget who can start there own Desktop line if they wish , tomorrow , ( I will keep repeating this to my death : DELL whas really started with 50 million ) , One is Red Hat who's not interested , the other is Novell who is not interested in retail customer that much.

BTW , instead of voting with your mouth , vote with your wallet , when the new SuSe come out go out and buy it. Give it as a gift and offer paid copy to those in the right position.

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: Novell developper Bulshit
by Mitarai on Tue 7th Feb 2006 21:07 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Novell developper Bulshit"
Mitarai Member since:
2005-07-28

BTW , instead of voting with your mouth , vote with your wallet , when the new SuSe come out go out and buy it. Give it as a gift and offer paid copy to those in the right position.

That's my intention, really.

Reply Score: 2

Moulinneuf Member since:
2005-07-06

Great ;-)

Reply Score: 1

thebluesgnr Member since:
2005-11-14

"I have to second that based on the result , just you will never make me accept the message sent with it "its better to develop everything in closed development with no one else input." GNU/Linux is where its at because its exactly the opposite of whats beeing sugested. "

May I remind you that one of the most important free software projects today was developed pretty much like Xgl, at least initially? I'm talking about GCC and how Stallman wrote it, and there are many other examples.

This model may not the best way to continue the development in the long term, which is probably why Xgl and Compiz are being merged to the freedesktop.org CVS. But thanks to the development model chosen by Novell we now have Xgl and Compiz as free software, and you'll be able to enjoy it on your system without having to obtain proprietary software.

If you want to vote with your wallet you could vote against proprietary software instead of against a development model.

Edited 2006-02-07 21:15

Reply Score: 2

Moulinneuf Member since:
2005-07-06

I aint arguing the result and how they did it , but the fact that they are advocating this method alone and are not fully disclosing the details.

"But thanks to the development model chosen by Novell we now have Xgl and Compiz as free software"

Thats where I disagree , 95% of the work add already been done by the community.

"and you'll be able to enjoy it on your system without having to obtain proprietary software."

"If you want to vote with your wallet"

If ? Ok ...

"you could vote against proprietary software"

I already do to a point. I am more a choice person than radical , I whant my proprietary and Free software on the same level on everything , then Free software clearly win.

"instead of against a development model."

I can do both , I aint arguing against the method , just that its a lie to suggest that the same thing would not have been achieved by the GNU/Linux community , and that this method is the best , the community actually did 95% of the work. I think I dispise more the Agenda beeing pushed here then the result and method used.

Reply Score: 3

RE[5]: Novell developper Bulshit
by Rehdon on Wed 8th Feb 2006 08:34 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Novell developper Bulshit"
Rehdon Member since:
2005-07-06

I aint arguing the result and how they did it , but the fact that they are advocating this method alone and are not fully disclosing the details.

It doesn't really seem to be the case, if you read Dan Winship's mail carefully you'll understand that they chose this method as they thought it was best for a specific purpose: to spearhead innovation in a critical area.

Considering that a) after the initial push the code is given to the community to further develop as open source software b) the remaining 99% of sw development at Novell follows the "traditional" method, I fail to understand what your concerns are.

rehdon

Reply Score: 1

Moulinneuf Member since:
2005-07-06

Since you did not read Dan winship mail , hence cant understood it let me quote directly from it :

"If we had proposed the changes on the mailing lists, it would have started a huge discussion about what people hated about the design ("you can't make the panel menu depend on beagle!!!") and how it should be different. And then we could have either (a) completely ignored everyone and done it ourselves anyway, or (b) had a long conversation about the merits of the design and then not actually finished the code in time for NLD10."

"An equivalent answer to the question is "because you can't do design by committee". Everything good in GNOME is good because one person or a small number of people working closely together made it good."

* Evolution's UI blocking on I/O SUCKS. Due to lack of design in the
early stages of development

* Evolution's integration with gaim and tomboy RULES. Both of these
happened because specific people (ChipX86, orph) made them happen.

* Multimedia integration SUCKS. No one has ever sat down and tried
to fix the big picture. (Although I think the gstreamer team is in
the process of doing this now?)

* Apps not remembering their window size and position SUCKS. Again,
needs someone to take this problem and make it their own. I
remember xkahn was trying to fix this a few years ago, but never
finished.

* Bug-buddy SUCKS. Jacob's original UI was simple and brilliant. But
as more and more people added more and more features without
looking at the big picture, it got unwieldy. (But now a small
team is putting the simplicity back in again.)

* Deskbar applet RULES (kikidonk), dashboard RULES (Nat), and beagle
RULES (trow and joe). None of these was done *exclusively* by
those people, but each of them reflects one person's (or a few
people's) vision, as opposed to the current state of bug buddy,
which just sort of happened.


"If you try to design something by committee, you either have to end up with the latter sort of messy does-everything UI, or you ignore and hence piss off a large chunk of the committee."

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: Novell developper Bulshit
by HeLfReZ on Tue 7th Feb 2006 21:15 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Novell developper Bulshit"
HeLfReZ Member since:
2005-08-12

I have, do, and always put my money into any project I use. It's funny how people will jump on the boards and scream blasphemy and talk nonsense, then when someone calls them on it, and they get moderated down (so obviously others agree hence the -5 moderations and the +5 moderation for my reply) they get political and proper. Face it you came on the boards with your chest poked out, then got moderated down, and now you are upset...The fact remains that, like one of the previous post, with the direction they look to be going, I WILL be buying NLD, and I also own stock in Novell, and have purchased previous versions, and have purchased and support other distros and small projects in the past... How many times have you clicked on those "Donations Here" buttons on the sites of all the opensource projects you hold up on your shoulders now...it also never fails to follow that you always get the line for line replies from the thread junkies who get their feelings hurt...Most of you replies were completely off basis, but hey its a public place, speak your mind, just be prepared to back up your claims...

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Novell developper Bulshit
by segedunum on Tue 7th Feb 2006 21:31 UTC in reply to "RE: Novell developper Bulshit"
segedunum Member since:
2005-07-06

Contrary to some zealots belief, the community doesnt know it all , and can sometimes do more to harm to itself than good.

I don't know why you got moderated to +5. It's amazing how seemingly politically correct comments can get modded up. You've just blown the case for open source software and the open source process out of the water. Want to develop software in-house? Great. Make it proprietary. At least Microsoft isn't fooling anyone over that.

I always thought some of those people were like Microsoft, except with open source software. I've been proved right. We can all sit back, relax and enjoy the perfect way to cause trouble and the perfectly wrong way to relate to the open source community in the coming weeks and months ;-).

Edited 2006-02-07 21:40

Reply Score: 5

cendrizzi Member since:
2005-07-08

I agree completely with the Novell statement. Designing something with everyone telling what to do and not to do is just silly. Look at just about any successful open source project, it started with a clear vision and implementation (and afterwards is maintained with someone who has the vision).

Imagine if Linus didn't spent all that time getting the first kernel out and instead discussed it with the "community", we wouldn't have linux.

Reply Score: 2

Get a Life Member since:
2006-01-01

Who made you King of "The Open Source Process?"

A lot of successful free software is largely developed by a small kernel of developers, who work on initial design and implementation concerns before accepting contributions from others. And a lot of free software that never goes anywhere was not-really-developed-at-all by a group of "contributors" that spent most of their time talking about software rather than writing it.

Maybe, just maybe there are a number of development processes people can use for an intended goal that also happen to involve open source licenses. Maybe those using different ones can do so without you yelling, "THERE GOES OPEN SOURCE DEVELOPMENT!" because you have some vendetta against them. That is unless you're going to start informing us how open source development is being discredited by the swarm of useless sourceforge projects that haven't been developed in six years.

Reply Score: 3

archiesteel Member since:
2005-07-02

When will you twits understand that there is no "the community"?

Resorting to insults again, eh, Lumbergh? Well I guess now that they've made moderation points harder to get you've crawled out from under your bridge.

There is a Linux community, but it's not the distinct, exclusive entity you're trying to set up as your straw man.

The truth is that there is a Linux community, just like there is a KDE community, a Gnome community, a X.org community, a few BSD communities, a Ubuntu community, a Debian community, a Mandrake community, an OpenSolaris community, a vim community, an Emacs community, and so on. Communities withing communities. I myself am a member of a few.

Each time someone expresses their interest for a piece of software enough to contribute to it (in whichever way they can - you don't need to be a programmer), then they are part of that specific community.

Both KDE and Gnome will profit from this new hardware-accelerated server, just like GNU/Linux, *BSD and other *nix systems will profit from it. I find it quite amusing that some people would manage to turn this into YAFW.

Reply Score: 3

Lumbergh Member since:
2005-06-29

Resorting to insults again, eh, Lumbergh? Well I guess now that they've made moderation points harder to get you've crawled out from under your bridge.

Hehe, why am I not surprised that you would care about such things.

There is a Linux community, but it's not the distinct, exclusive entity you're trying to set up as your straw man.

Oh, but that's exactly what Sedge was trying to say (even though he doesn't believe it). Only people like you believe it. Sedge is just A#1 KDE fangirl, and thus his pissing and moaning about everything Novell does.

The truth is that there is a Linux community, just like there is a KDE community, a Gnome community, a X.org community, a few BSD communities, a Ubuntu community, a Debian community, a Mandrake community, an OpenSolaris community, a vim community, an Emacs community, and so on. Communities withing communities. I myself am a member of a few.

Each time someone expresses their interest for a piece of software enough to contribute to it (in whichever way they can - you don't need to be a programmer), then they are part of that specific community.

Whatever makes you feel better about yourself. Does it make you feel warm and fuzzy because in your fantasy world you are part of "the community"?

Both KDE and Gnome will profit from this new hardware-accelerated server, just like GNU/Linux, *BSD and other *nix systems will profit from it. I find it quite amusing that some people would manage to turn this into YAFW.

Exactly, so why don't you talk to your Novell-hating pal Sedge there about why he added to YAFW.

Reply Score: 0

segedunum Member since:
2005-07-06

Oh, but that's exactly what Sedge was trying to say (even though he doesn't believe it). Only people like you believe it.

You simply don't grok what I was talking about. If you share code with others then you need to let them know what you're doing and how they can get involved. If not, then you have trouble and people feeling as if they are being undermined. If you have that situation then you have what is known as a fork, and you can see how upset Dan Winship got when that word was mentioned.

The open source community is not one whole group or entity, and it definitely isn't people going off and doing their own thing, and complete parallel development, in a closed environment. The community is a lot more fluid than either of those extremes - you're both wrong about what I was saying.

Working in a community where you use the code and work others have produced is all about working with people - something you seem to know very little about. I can imagine that that is why many programmers like to go off to a closed room somewhere and just code, which is what some people at Novell seem to be doing. My point is that if you are developing with open source software, more than any other software development method, if you choose that route then it leads straight to hell.

Sedge is just A#1 KDE fangirl, and thus his pissing and moaning about everything Novell does.

You speak for yourself, as always :-). It doesn't alter anything. If you have something to say related to what was actually said, by all means do so. However, there's only so many times you can repeat that.

The reasons why I moan about Novell, or more specifically, some of the things they do, I have consistently laid out. You people then moan back because you simply don't want to accept that some peoples' marketing at Novell, and what they're doing, is complete BS - and no, they're not the centre of the universe. We have had the same marketing BS for YEARS, and it hasn't done them, open source software and the cause of desktop Linux one iota of good. And then they do YAP (yet another presentation - good acronym!) and expect people to clap and cheer over things that are totally unrelated to the function of their enterprise product, or which I and others have been doing for months with little fanfare.

Exactly, so why don't you talk to your Novell-hating pal Sedge there about why he added to YAFW.

Poor you.

Reply Score: 1

Lumbergh Member since:
2005-06-29

You simply don't grok what I was talking about. If you share code with others then you need to let them know what you're doing and how they can get involved. If not, then you have trouble and people feeling as if they are being undermined. If you have that situation then you have what is known as a fork, and you can see how upset Dan Winship got when that word was mentioned.

I know exactly what you *mean*. What you meant was that where would be some big backlash against Novell because "the community" didn't like this "in-house" work. Nice try, but your jihad against Novell/Ximian/Gnome is impotent.

Working in a community where you use the code and work others have produced is all about working with people

There's that "community" thing again. If we just say "community" and "freedom" enough times it'll lead to....uhmm, nowhere

can imagine that that is why many programmers like to go off to a closed room somewhere and just code, which is what some people at Novell seem to be doing. My point is that if you are developing with open source software, more than any other software development method, if you choose that route then it leads straight to hell.

Did you even read the rational on the mailing list for the in-house work? - apparently not. In any case, you and the other anti-Novell, sniveling weenies are in no position to tell Novell employees, or anybody else for that matter, what they should or shouldn't do. But in your demented, little fantasy world Novell's actions "lead straight to hell"

Sedge is just A#1 KDE fangirl, and thus his pissing and moaning about everything Novell does.

You speak for yourself, as always :-). It doesn't alter anything. If you have something to say related to what was actually said, by all means do so. However, there's only so many times you can repeat that.


Haha, nice try at ducking and running around the known fact that you're a one trick pony with nothing except antipathy for anybody that doesn't embrace KDE.

The reasons why I moan about Novell, or more specifically, some of the things they do, I have consistently laid out.

And why do you care? What is your stake in Novell's enterprise desktop? Oh, wait, you don't have one.

You people then moan back because you simply don't want to accept that some peoples' marketing at Novell, and what they're doing, is complete BS - and no, they're not the centre of the universe.

Haha, I could care less about Novell's marketing. I ran Suse once, for about 2 days on a partition, and then went back to Kanotix - running KDE no less.



We have had the same marketing BS for YEARS, and it hasn't done them, open source software and the cause of desktop Linux one iota of good. And then they do YAP (yet another presentation - good acronym!) and expect people to clap and cheer over things that are totally unrelated to the function of their enterprise product, or which I and others have been doing for months with little fanfare.


Why do you even give a damn? Why don't you just apply for a position at Novell if you're so worried about their marketing. We had the discusssion about autopackage and ISVs not too long ago and really Novell isn't even in a position to do a whole helluva lot about Linux's indemic desktop problems.

Exactly, so why don't you talk to your Novell-hating pal Sedge there about why he added to YAFW.

Poor you

Sedge, I know the truth hurts. Maybe the folks over at dot.kde.org will console you.

Reply Score: 0

archiesteel Member since:
2005-07-02

Whatever makes you feel better about yourself. Does it make you feel warm and fuzzy because in your fantasy world you are part of "the community"?

Communities exist, whether you can see it or not. There is a Linux community as long as people claim to be part of it, whether you like it or not. The fact that you did not offer counter arguments, but rather resorted to insults - as usual - only servers to reinforce my points.

What a sad, sad man you are.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Novell developper Bulshit
by kaiwai on Wed 8th Feb 2006 05:25 UTC in reply to "RE: Novell developper Bulshit"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

LOL..I think you did a fine example of showing us all why the development was done indoors. Contrary to some zealots belief, the community doesnt know it all , and can sometimes do more to harm to itself than good. If Novell wants to develop for nothing but GNOME and not KDE , if they want to develop stuff inhouse...then contribute back later, more power to them. I doubt they sent GNOME or Xorg a bill for the work they did that will benefit everyone in the community. I for one wish more of this will be done in the future. Can you imagine how long it would have taken the "community" to develop a XGL to the level they have??? We would spend 6months bickering over protocols and languages...I say KUDOS to Novell for what looks to be a job well done...And I look forward to seeing some of the changes they have made to THEIR version of GNOME make it into mainstream...

I completely agree.

About bickering, thats assuming they get over the philosophical arguments relating to the opensource licence to use, and which one is has been blessed by stallman himself.

Contra to the myth of OSS advocates, who see OSS as the be-all and end-all; people are attracted to projeccts because of a sexy factor - and I'm sorry, the VAST majority of what needs to be done on the desktop is not very sexy, very mundane and very boring, hence the reason why we need the likes of Novell to work on the shit boring stuff - programmers may not like it, but at the same time, they know if they're being paid for the work, they'll begrudgingly do it because its paid employment.

SUN did the same thing, Novell is doing the same thing as well - the realise that it isn't all sunshine and lolly pops for OSS desktop, and sometimes a complete working version (or atleast the ground work) needs to be done, before throwing it out into the internet, atleast then, coupled with a roadmap and something to focus on, the project hijackers of the OSS world don't stand a chance.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Novell developper Bulshit
by Ookaze on Wed 8th Feb 2006 12:49 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Novell developper Bulshit"
Ookaze Member since:
2005-11-14

About bickering, thats assuming they get over the philosophical arguments relating to the opensource licence to use, and which one is has been blessed by stallman himself

I don't understand what you mean. The recommended (what you call blessed) by RMS licences are known already. Choice of licence has nothing to do with philosophy either for most developers.

Contra to the myth of OSS advocates, who see OSS as the be-all and end-all

I didn't know that. Where did you find the demonstration of what you say ?
I thought OSS was there to remove the beliefs of Free Software.

people are attracted to projeccts because of a sexy factor - and I'm sorry, the VAST majority of what needs to be done on the desktop is not very sexy, very mundane and very boring

That's just not true. I sure does not see it like that. I see that it is very interesting, but means lots of involvement, with no rewards except self satisfaction of making everything work better.
I mean, look at pango. Most people, even here, can't even understand how it amazingly improved i18n and others things on Gnome (everybody takes it for granted perhaps), but the only comments I see about it, is that it is sh*t and should be replaced. Great reward ...
Or look at people bashing (KDE or Gnome) devs because their feature is still not implemented or their bug is still not fixed.
I regularly look at Federico's blog about Gnome and performance, and I find it extremely interesting and sexy, but I can't contribute because I would need several hours straight to get some meaningful results. Federico can do that because he's paid for it, that's much more time to do these things.

hence the reason why we need the likes of Novell to work on the shit boring stuff - programmers may not like it, but at the same time, they know if they're being paid for the work, they'll begrudgingly do it because its paid employment

BS again. To develop things like that, you need LOTS of time, several PCs, processing power, graphic cards, ...
So it's easier to Novell to provide that than individuals in their basement.
You say developers do this begrudgingly, but I have a hard time believeing that. I think time is the main resource lacking lots of developers to do all this work, that's why some have to abandon such projects.

the realise that it isn't all sunshine and lolly pops for OSS desktop, and sometimes a complete working version needs to be done, before throwing it out into the internet, atleast then, coupled with a roadmap and something to focus on, the project hijackers of the OSS world don't stand a chance

Xgl is still development code. The benefits are there for me now though, even if I won't install Xgl before a while. Because it's now easier to shut off trolls that repeat endlessly that Vista is better than everything else and Linux desktops are doomed (!!).
I did not understand why there was such hatred for Novell, but I do not understand the hatred for OSS world either. I don't even understand what or who are the 'project hijackers of the OSS world'.
I though 'project hijackers' existed only in the proprietary (closed) world.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Novell developper Bulshit
by Kroc on Wed 8th Feb 2006 15:15 UTC in reply to "RE: Novell developper Bulshit"
Kroc Member since:
2005-11-10

Lol, my sentiment exactly http://osnews.com/permalink.php?news_id=13551&comment_id=92467

Novell are being brutally honest about the downsides of the community, and the community would do well to actually listen instead of bicker more.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Weird
by Solkaris on Tue 7th Feb 2006 19:19 UTC
Solkaris
Member since:
2006-01-16

SuSE purchase was to get the underlying Linux System, not the desktop that could be replaced easily. Novell needed a solid Linux Distro to base their NDL on. SuSE was one of the top distro at the time so they bought it. Not really that weird.

Reply Score: 5

Start menu?
by miscz on Tue 7th Feb 2006 19:19 UTC
miscz
Member since:
2005-07-17

Who got the idea to drop traditional Applications/Places/System menu over dumbed down XP/Vista start menu clone? : It may look nice but the old one is far more elegant and efficient.

The presentation videos are pretty cool, I wonder about stability tough. Available composite extension and composite managers can't be used in real world because of crashing, even if it happens once a month. I hope compiz will resolve this issue.

Reply Score: 5

RE: Start menu?
by JCooper on Tue 7th Feb 2006 19:28 UTC in reply to "Start menu?"
JCooper Member since:
2005-07-06

While I agree Applications/Places/System had its merits, you have to admit the System > Administration, System > Preferences and Applications > System is a bit confusing and a bit of a mess. The Places menu is incredibly useful, but hopefully this "new" menu incorporates that.

I've been using beagle and the deskbar applet as a recplacement for the menu for a few weeks now, and this menu appears to take the best of both worlds - offer regularly/recently used applications as large icons (replacing those attached to a panel), provide a search interface within easy reach to get to "what you're looking for", and reduce the panel clutter from a "standard" Gnome desktop setup.

Reply Score: 4

RE[2]: Start menu?
by miscz on Tue 7th Feb 2006 22:35 UTC in reply to "RE: Start menu?"
miscz Member since:
2005-07-17

I've wrote my previous post mainly because of lack of equivalent of Places in the new "Start" menu. I would reconsider my opinion if it could be nicely merged ;)

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: Start menu?
by aent on Wed 8th Feb 2006 04:38 UTC in reply to "RE: Start menu?"
aent Member since:
2006-01-25

Well, in gnome 2.14, Applications -> System tools was removed and merged into the appropiate other menus.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Start menu?
by GhePeU on Tue 7th Feb 2006 19:48 UTC in reply to "Start menu?"
GhePeU Member since:
2005-07-06

The presentation videos are pretty cool, I wonder about stability tough. Available composite extension and composite managers can't be used in real world because of crashing, even if it happens once a month. I hope compiz will resolve this issue.

This was true, but Xorg 6.9/7.0 reallt improved everything. I've been using EXA + xcompmgr + Gnome 2.12 since xorg 7.0 release with just a minor glitch (the log out windows is invisible unless I kill xcompmgr before).

Reply Score: 2

NDL videos
by NDunkel on Tue 7th Feb 2006 19:25 UTC
NDunkel
Member since:
2005-07-06

well, they copied exposť and the cube effect...
not that I care...I'm glad to see this coming to linux!

Reply Score: 3

RE: NDL videos
by hohlraum on Tue 7th Feb 2006 21:32 UTC in reply to "NDL videos"
hohlraum Member since:
2005-12-13

come off it.. 3ddesktop had the 'cube' affect LONG before apple had it. anything anyone has stolen from apple was stolen by apple.

Reply Score: 4

Xglx or Xegl?
by Wes Felter on Tue 7th Feb 2006 19:38 UTC
Wes Felter
Member since:
2005-11-15

What is in these improvements? Does Xegl work yet or are they planning to ship the Xglx kludge?

Reply Score: 1

RE: Xglx or Xegl?
by zlynx on Tue 7th Feb 2006 19:47 UTC in reply to "Xglx or Xegl?"
zlynx Member since:
2005-07-20

Kludge? Personally, I always thought Xegl was a dead end. Just drop the 2D already. Nobody cares.

3D is the future, and anything that needs extra 2D love and care can define an OpenGL extension to handle it.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Xglx or Xegl?
by siki_miki on Tue 7th Feb 2006 20:31 UTC in reply to "Xglx or Xegl?"
siki_miki Member since:
2006-01-17

And XglX uses air? It still requires some of "2D" (modesetting), which can be either the awful Xorg XAA way of dealing with things, or a clean new GL API based display device interface which can handle multiple graphic cards, exotic / multi- display modes, as well as hotplugging.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Xglx or Xegl?
by poofyhairguy on Wed 8th Feb 2006 03:25 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Xglx or Xegl?"
poofyhairguy Member since:
2005-07-14

And XglX uses air? It still requires some of "2D" (modesetting), which can be either the awful Xorg XAA way of dealing with things, or a clean new GL API based display device interface which can handle multiple graphic cards, exotic / multi- display modes, as well as hotplugging.

Or choice three: EXA. It was made for a reason. Now its obvious why. The free Unix Desktop will scale from old machines (who would use EXA/XAA and no XGL) to medium machines (that will use XGL for 3D stuff and EXA for 2D stuff) and high end future machines (all 3D).

It might not be the most elegant way to do things, but since when is that the Xserver's style?

Reply Score: 1

Next Step
by thabrain on Tue 7th Feb 2006 19:41 UTC
thabrain
Member since:
2005-06-29

I think it's great that Novell has released this; Linux has needed this to put it's visuals on par with OS X.

Now the question is, how does this get packaged, and which distro other than a "Novell" based one will have it show up first?

Compiling this from CVS is a bit much for me to want to do. Has any other distro made mention of this?

Reply Score: 1

RE: Next Step
by Hands on Wed 8th Feb 2006 17:32 UTC in reply to "Next Step"
Hands Member since:
2005-06-30

It's been interesting to me to notice how many things that Novell has done that other distro's didn't want to do that have later been integrated into those other distro's. It has been stated that no one has to use any of this even though it's free code. Novell doesn't have a problem with a little brand differentiation. I wouldn't be surprised though to see this added to the big distro's at least within the next year.

Reply Score: 1

KDE 4
by Guppetto on Tue 7th Feb 2006 19:43 UTC
Guppetto
Member since:
2005-07-06

I wonder if the KDE guys will use XGL and Compiz. They're going to have an accelerated desktop as well, and XGL could speed up that process. I

I wonder why they didn't just go to the real solution and work on XEGL. XGL is kind of like the mid point to where the graphic subsystem eventually must go.

Reply Score: 1

RE: KDE 4
by anda_skoa on Tue 7th Feb 2006 20:37 UTC in reply to "KDE 4"
anda_skoa Member since:
2005-07-07

I wonder if the KDE guys will use XGL and Compiz.

Do you have any information why a KDE user would be prevented from using XGL?

My understanding is that this is a Xserver, meaning any X11 application will use it when being run on it.

Reply Score: 4

RE: KDE 4
by Rehdon on Wed 8th Feb 2006 08:38 UTC in reply to "KDE 4"
Rehdon Member since:
2005-07-06

Aaeron Seigo said he was happy with the outcome and that he thought there is enough time to integrate Xgl into KDE 4.

rehdon

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: weird
by suslik on Tue 7th Feb 2006 19:46 UTC
suslik
Member since:
2005-07-27

While Novell bought the KDE-centric SUSE, they also bought the very Gnome centric Ximian and looking at who did this work, it was the Ximian side.

Don't gloat too much. KDE ppl did it (practical transparency / compositing manager integration) more than a year ago. All the settings are in the Control Panel.

Reply Score: 3

Will this code be accepted
by John Blink on Tue 7th Feb 2006 19:58 UTC
John Blink
Member since:
2005-10-11

Or will distro's or projects just have a not built here mentality about it. Then try to rewrite the code.

Reply Score: 1

link is dead
by postmodern on Tue 7th Feb 2006 20:00 UTC
postmodern
Member since:
2006-01-27

Apparently mail.gnome.org:80 is down, I really want to read why it was kept behind closed doors.

Edited 2006-02-07 20:01

Reply Score: 1

RE: link is dead
by GhePeU on Tue 7th Feb 2006 20:07 UTC in reply to "link is dead"
GhePeU Member since:
2005-07-06
The world outside of Novel
by Hamman on Tue 7th Feb 2006 20:17 UTC
Hamman
Member since:
2006-01-02

I don't really see a problem with Novell developing this software indoors, as they have chosen to make it modular. Thus KDE, E17, XFCE etc can develop and add their own plugins, and these effects or features can then be used by all WMs, which is very cool. This development didn't hurt anyone, as Novel knew that should they make XGL incompatible with other DE's or distros, the community wouldn't adopt it. What it did is benefited the entire community. I mean, this project was practically dead six months ago, and now it's actually working! Might not be complete yet, but it's not too far.
It seems that Linux will be able to keep up with Vista and OSX in the graphics department, something that seemed unlikely not long ago.
I say more power to Novel for putting this technology at our disposal!

Reply Score: 4

Thoughtful comments
by cendrizzi on Tue 7th Feb 2006 20:20 UTC
cendrizzi
Member since:
2005-07-08

I think the developer comments were spot on when it comes to design. Great decision on their part.

Plus I think it will also be enough to get me to put money on the next version of NLD.

Reply Score: 1

Wonder wonder
by CuriosityKills on Tue 7th Feb 2006 20:32 UTC
CuriosityKills
Member since:
2005-07-10

Where are the anti-MS crowd who were cursing Microsoft by saying who need hardware acceleration for graphics etc. Come on guys, be honest, come out here and say its crap. Instead OSS guys should try to improve the basic desktop right?

Really a 3D cube, i don't think my idea of using computer is playing games. They better work on increasing productivity rather than some crap stuff like 3D cube which looks cool but is almost useless to find a running app. eXpose like design is way better.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Wonder wonder
by thebluesgnr on Tue 7th Feb 2006 20:50 UTC in reply to "Wonder wonder"
thebluesgnr Member since:
2005-11-14

Compiz will allow for all kind of effects to be developed thanks to its plugin system. Some of these improve the usability of the environment, some are nothing more than bling for the people who like it. Compiz will have an expose plugin (which was actually shown in the demo, please watch it again), as well as the cube plugin. Expose or cube are not different designs, they're two features that will be available by default in Compiz.

The cube plugin has nothing to do with gaming. It's about improving the experience of using multiple workspaces. Please read http://news.com.com/Novell+seeks+to+boost+Linux+graphics/2100-7344_...

Edited 2006-02-07 20:51

Reply Score: 1

RE: Wonder wonder
by archiesteel on Tue 7th Feb 2006 22:51 UTC in reply to "Wonder wonder"
archiesteel Member since:
2005-07-02

They better work on increasing productivity rather than some crap stuff like 3D cube which looks cool but is almost useless to find a running app. eXpose like design is way better.

Did you actually follow the link? Because video #3 shows off an eXpose clone, with a transparent window that plays the Harry Potter trailer...

Reply Score: 2

RE: Wonder wonder
by Tweek on Wed 8th Feb 2006 01:39 UTC in reply to "Wonder wonder"
Tweek Member since:
2006-01-12

You really suffer from a lack of vision...

the cube is simply a demo of capabilities not an end user tool...

and you are trolling/delusional or more likely making up that first paragraph so I wont bother to refute that.

Maybe you should work on the creative aspect of your seriousely lacking personality before critisizing others for creating something new (which you obviousely havent even come close to)

your nick is very fitting in this case. aka you might as well be called "TunnelVision"

Reply Score: 0

RE: Wonder wonder
by Hands on Wed 8th Feb 2006 18:27 UTC in reply to "Wonder wonder"
Hands Member since:
2005-06-30

You seem like a troll, and your post is simply an attack on other trolls. I will, however, try to give a response to your question for those who might really be interested.

A 3D cube by itself isn't something that would improve productivity, but virtual desktops are. A 3D cube is something that can make virtual desktops more tactile to those that like that sort of thing. So, in some ways more graphics power can be an improvement on an already powerful desktop.

Just because MS hasn't released any form of virtual desktops doesn't mean that there aren't real uses for them or possible improvements in the ways that they are used that an MS junkie might not recognize or appreciate. There are actually people who feel hampered when using Windows for the lack of virtual desktops. Those people would much rather see virtual desktops in Windows before they would care much about transparent windows or sidebars.

More concepts and ideas will become possible as a result of better graphical capabilites regardless of whether it's Windows or Linux. A 3D cube may not be the best addition to virutal desktops in the end or even to the desktop as a whole, but sometimes concepts need to be tested before they can be proven.

Unfortunately, I think that the complaints made by many people about Vista is that the changes seem mainly cosmetic (a major gripe if true after years in development). I know that there is more to Vista than graphical capabilities, but with so many promised features removed, people do have some valid complaints.

Reply Score: 1

Pretty Fun Looking
by dswain on Tue 7th Feb 2006 20:52 UTC
dswain
Member since:
2005-07-03

Anyone know of any good guidance on compiling/installing this from CVS? Managed to get the source, but doesn't seem to have a makefile included or anything. I don't think compiling each file by hand is a fun idea.

Reply Score: 1

Enterprise desktop?
by michi on Tue 7th Feb 2006 21:31 UTC
michi
Member since:
2006-02-04

As far as I understand, NLD 10 is an enterprise desktop. Why does an enterprise desktop actually need fancy 3D effects? As a long time linux desktop user I am glad that Novell is contributing to XGL, but I don't really see how this is useful for an enterprise desktop.

I am also a KDE user myself and I am not very happy that Novell bought one of the major KDE based distros and is no degrading KDE to a second class citizen. I think this is a mistake. KDE was really what made SUSE special and now Novell turns it into just another GNOME distro. There is no real reason anymore to chose NLD/SUSE over Redhat/Fedora or Ubuntu.

And I also think it is quite unfortunate that Nat Friedmann (and to a lesser extend Miguel de Icaza) are anti-KDE (at least that is my impression). I have seen lots of former SUSE (KDE) users in forums complaining about them. This splits the community. But for the success of Linux on the desktop, GNOME and KDE have to cooperate. People will not use Linux on the desktop because of some fancy graphical effects. In the end applications matter and it is a matter of fact that some of the best Linux applications are KDE/Qt applications like k3b, scribus, amorok. Of course one can try to recreate them using Gnome/gtk, but this is a total waste of resources which could be used much better in other areas. In my opinion it is absolutely necessary to integrate KDE/Qt apps in GNOME as good as possible (and of course Gnome/gtk apps into KDE), because a desktop with a mixed set of applications (say firefox, oo, k3b, amorok, inkscape, gimp, krita) will be superior to a pure KDE/Gnome desktop. KDE applications in Gnome should use the Gnome theme and the Gnome file selector (for example) and the other way round. And in this respect it is really bad that many KDE users/developers actually have the impression that Nat Friedmann and Miguel de Icaza want to harm KDE. I think both should really try to give KDE people the impression that this is not the case. Because in the long run it will hurt linux on the desktop if there is not more corporation between Gnome and KDE.

Reply Score: 4

RE: Enterprise desktop?
by segedunum on Tue 7th Feb 2006 22:01 UTC in reply to "Enterprise desktop?"
segedunum Member since:
2005-07-06

As far as I understand, NLD 10 is an enterprise desktop. Why does an enterprise desktop actually need fancy 3D effects?

Well, it's nice that it's happening. However, why they want to put that kind of effort into this for an enterprise (I laugh every time I hear that word) desktop is anyone's guess. Maybe they're trying to convince Novell's own employees to use Gnome, or even just desktop Linux period? Who knows? That's the only reason I can think of. Get people useing desktop Linux by allowing them to plug their iPod in at work and manage their photo collection. Not that you should be doing that at work of course, but I've been doing that (along with Suse Linux and other KDE users - maybe even Novell employees) with Digikam, Amarok and an iPod slave for months. Feel free to come and knock me out any time Nat ;-).

I am also a KDE user myself and I am not very happy that Novell bought one of the major KDE based distros and is no degrading KDE to a second class citizen. I think this is a mistake.

Hmmm. You're believing far too much of the bullshit. The most widely used Novell distribution is still Suse Linux and openSUSE, and the desktop everyone uses there is still KDE. The NLD has a userbase that pales in comparison to Suse Linux, Ubuntu and probably distributions like Linspire as well.

People will not use Linux on the desktop because of some fancy graphical effects. In the end applications matter...

Well spotted. From the looks of things that's about all they have though, unfortunately :-).

Reply Score: 2

RE: Enterprise desktop?
by mOrPhie on Tue 7th Feb 2006 22:16 UTC in reply to "Enterprise desktop?"
mOrPhie Member since:
2006-01-02

As far as I understand, NLD 10 is an enterprise desktop. Why does an enterprise desktop actually need fancy 3D effects? As a long time linux desktop user I am glad that Novell is contributing to XGL, but I don't really see how this is useful for an enterprise desktop.

The most important thing about this is responsiveness. I aggree with you that an enterprise desktop doesn't need wobbly windows, but the responsiveness is amazing. A major glitch in X-Desktops where the slowness of it, which sometimes frustrated people. With Xgl, this is history and the X-desktop is faster than ever before. Using hardware for rendering the desktop should have been done looong before now.

Edited 2006-02-07 22:16

Reply Score: 5

RE[2]: Enterprise desktop?
by Howie S on Wed 8th Feb 2006 01:57 UTC in reply to "RE: Enterprise desktop?"
Howie S Member since:
2005-07-14

Using hardware for rendering the desktop should have been done looong before now.

I agree.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Enterprise desktop?
by siki_miki on Thu 9th Feb 2006 15:39 UTC in reply to "RE: Enterprise desktop?"
siki_miki Member since:
2006-01-17

It wasn't possible because software just wasn't there (hardware WAS, almost 5 years ago). Linux 3D drivers (very bad except Nvidia in recent years), lack of needed OpenGL extensions for speedup, Xfree86 stagnation...it is good to have all that finally behind.

Xgl is just about to go mainstream, with great push from Novell which endorsed it (a very wise choice IMO). They do it primarily because of Vista and to kill off Sun's and RedHat's initiatives.

Luminocity is now certainly dead, while Looking Glass will remain a niche experimental GUI. Eventually Gnome and KDE will pick up some good stuff from LG and slowly advance to hybrid 2D-3D desktop with ability to behave (configurably) in both ways.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Enterprise desktop?
by thebluesgnr on Tue 7th Feb 2006 22:36 UTC in reply to "Enterprise desktop?"
thebluesgnr Member since:
2005-11-14

I just realized I don't agree with most of the points you made in your post. ;)

1) Enterprise also includes desktops, so improving the desktop environment is part of it. The fancy effects are not there so desktop consumers will be impressed by the software; these effects actually help making the software easier to use. XGL is also faster than a normal X server, with or without the pretty plugins, so it makes the Novell products more interesting to their customers.

2) The products from Novell that will be focusing on GNOME are not the ones you care about (by "you" I mean anyone who actually knows what KDE and GNOME are). What you care about is SUSE Linux which is probably even better for KDE users now than it was before. For one OpenSUSE was created; SuSE wasn't free before (YaST was proprietary software, relicensed under the GPL after Novell bought it).

3) You can't say that Miguel and Nat are anti-KDE based on comments you read from people that claim to be KDE users (I'm not saying KDE developers on purpose). Maybe this feeling is because people have the (wrong) idea that SUSE and OpenSUSE will become GNOME-centric products, when in fact that's not true. They equally support both environments.

Regarding the applications you mentioned, GNOME (and Novell) are just picking a different approach, not recreating KDE apps with GNOME libraries. For example, if you want to create a CD with files under GNOME (a "data" CD) you do it from the file manager. If you want to create a music CD ("audio" CD) you do it from your music library (Banshee in the NLD). This is a different approach and some people will prefer it.

Reply Score: 4

Get it straight
by HeLfReZ on Tue 7th Feb 2006 21:53 UTC
HeLfReZ
Member since:
2005-08-12

Dear Seggy...Get the story str8 first, That's in no way blows the case for opensource...what it does is discredit the case that every piece of linux software needs to be developed open source or it will suk. Take comments in their entirely not out of context. I am not attacking open source, but rather defending a companies right to choose. Last I checked nothing Novell did broke any of the strict rules on source that the community set forth, but there are alot of opeople who want to discredit their effort because they couldnt watch over them. Like the poster who mentioned GCC sated, its all for the good of the whole, and don't even bring MS into the discussion because thats entirely irrelevant to the fact that people feel "betrayed" that Novell developed somethign in house and they couldnt put in their 2cent s worth during the process...I am for one ELATED that they did inhouse and have now contributed the code back to the community, becuase let us not forget Xgl was basically DEAD until they took over inhouse, and now we have a amazing new toy to play with that is really going to do alot for the community...so again i'm calling bullshit...Unlike some I think that be it open or closed development...it the code is given back openly...GREAT..being in a corporate environment, I know that sometimes 3 guys working fulltime with no one poking around, can sometimes get alot more done alot faster than a having to take every decision to a 25panel committee...either way its all about CHOICE...thats the true essence of opensource...having the choice to run what you want to run, and how you want to run it...if you don't like the code they released, fixed it, change it, make it work for you...but don't get pissed because they didnt include you in the process even though they gave you the results...It's like me being pissed that Playskool didnt consult me on what shape the playdough can should be, even though i can make it whatever shape I want once I have it lol...

*NOTE: last comment for thread...again grats to Novell for a job well done, look forward to seeing what comes out of the labor...

Edited 2006-02-07 21:56

Reply Score: 2

It's your choice...
by GoLinux on Tue 7th Feb 2006 22:22 UTC
GoLinux
Member since:
2005-08-08

I have to make a few observations. Disclaimer: I am a Novell employee. But I speak for myself.

1. Both open and closed development models have their own advantages. That's one reason why both exist.

2. Using any open source software is OPTIONAL. If you don't like it, how it was developed, or its hardware requirements, you don't have to use it.

The important thing here is CHOICE. The community will benefit from source that is developed behind closed doors and then released. It's important that organizations are not forced into contributing to OSS wholly by open development. As has been previously stated, the worst-case scenario for the contribution is that it is rejected. But from there, it is still potentially something to learn from.

Reply Score: 4

KDE
by SlackerJack on Tue 7th Feb 2006 22:52 UTC
SlackerJack
Member since:
2005-11-12

Why is it that KDE users get upset when they see Novell using GNOME? So they have redesigned GNOME and showed XGL running on it, good for us. If you dont like GNOME whats the big deal?. When this gets released KDE4 cannot come soon enough.

Reply Score: 1

RE: KDE
by thebluesgnr on Tue 7th Feb 2006 23:07 UTC in reply to "KDE"
thebluesgnr Member since:
2005-11-14

Just to make it clear, Novell hasn't redesigned GNOME. They simply wrote a new menu applet (GNOME already has two in a default installation, with the Applications/Places/Desktop being the default).

Reply Score: 4

RE[2]: KDE
by SlackerJack on Tue 7th Feb 2006 23:39 UTC in reply to "RE: KDE"
SlackerJack Member since:
2005-11-12

Yes but shots are clearly the same as the mockups and GNOME dont have the bar on the bottom like that. Funny how I get modded down when talking about KDE, but KDE lot get modded up for there KDE novell madness.

Reply Score: 1

all work by the community
by dizzey on Tue 7th Feb 2006 22:57 UTC
dizzey
Member since:
2005-10-15

wasnt most of the stuff on xgl written by david.
thats kind of the impression i got.

and david was the main coder at novell for the project.

Reply Score: 1

From the horses mouth
by SEJeff on Tue 7th Feb 2006 23:24 UTC
SEJeff
Member since:
2005-11-05

The official press release from Novell is here:
http://www.novell.com/linux/xglrelease/

Reply Score: 2

make resizing smooth.. please?!
by insultcomicgeek on Wed 8th Feb 2006 00:01 UTC
insultcomicgeek
Member since:
2006-01-07

All this stuff looks really smooth and whatnot.. but even in one of those videos on the novell site you can see that resizing a window is still dog slow. It's kind of embarrassing if you showcase all those neat effects and such a "simple" task as resizing a window looks as shitty as that.
So are they (whoever that is) working on this or is it on some sort of to-do list or something? Any info on it would be appreciated..

Reply Score: 1

archiesteel Member since:
2005-07-02

All this stuff looks really smooth and whatnot.. but even in one of those videos on the novell site you can see that resizing a window is still dog slow.

It did seem slow, but this is in fact a lot more complicated than you claim. Moving objects in 3D, compositing them is a lot simpler than changing their geometry and remapping their surface.

I imagine someone is working on it, but whatever happens resizing is always going to take more juice than moving them and/or applying an alpha channel.

Reply Score: 1

insultcomicgeek Member since:
2006-01-07

I know it's technically probably a very difficult thing to do/fix. I didn't mean to call it "simple" in that way, but for me, as a stupid end-user, it's one thing that stands out as an issue.
Well, I hope that there's someone working on it somehow. I just never see anyone actually mention anyting about resizing windows and I'm afraid that's why it's not a high priority issue..

Reply Score: 1

Daniel Borgmann Member since:
2005-07-08

There is no magical solution to make resizing fast, since the whole window content has to be recalculated (not just scaled) constantly. Depending on the complexity of the content this can be either fast or slow. Compositing doesn't help at all with this and it will likely never be lightning fast. It can only remove the flickering, so it appears more "solid".

I personally don't see why this should be a big deal. I'm not constantly resizing windows, so I don't mind if it looks slow as long as it's reasonably responsive.

Reply Score: 5

insultcomicgeek Member since:
2006-01-07

Actually compositing made it worse. It doesn't need to be lighting fast, but just as fast that the window follows the cursor in a somewhat fluid way.
I, for one, resize my windows all the time and for me it's just not reasonably responsive. I know this is a very subjective topic but I think right now (with compositing) it's just unbearably slow (close to being broken).

Reply Score: 1

rayiner Member since:
2005-07-06

Resizing on X is a bit more complicated than it seems. Reflow (the computation of the new window contents) is actually fairly low on the list of problems. Notice how applications that have slow resize on Linux (eg: Firefox), have very smooth resize on OS X or Windows, even though the reflow code is the same on both platforms.

The real problem is synchronization. The window manager and client aren't synchronized during resize, which hurts things enormously. In theory, there is a NETWM spec to achieve this synchronization, and I had a Qt/kwin patch that implemented the spec to good effect (at least on my 2GHz P4 laptop) to make resizing smoothness fairly comparable to Windows. My motivation to finish the patch is unfortunately very limited, given I don't use KDE anymore.

GTK/metacity have an implementation of the spec as well (included since GNOME 2.8 or 2.10, I think), but its results are much less impressive than on KDE. I don't know the GTK source code all that well, but my guess is that GTK's rather aggressive buffering and combining of EXPOSE events actually hurts redraw latency in order to minimize overdraw. Qt's redraw model, in contrast, is very simple and low latency, at the expense of having more overdraw. I'm inclined to argue that Qt's model is better, given that the "feel" of responsiveness is entirely dominated by latency.

All that aside, its become apparent to me that synchronization isn't super-useful without full use of compositing. No matter how fast the app handles content reflow, and no matter how well the application and window manager are synchronized, the user will still see an ugly (if fast) resize unless the process is double-buffered. The last time I looked into the issue, COMPOSITE wasn't fully able to support the window resize semantics necessary for double-buffering resize (you need to be able to seperate the allocation of the new window buffer and the deallocation of the old one, and during the resize itself have a handle to both copies), though this feature might have been added recently. Of course, implementing it efficiently is another can of worms --- allocating/deallocating all those buffers during a resize demands a lot from the memory manager, and video memory management is a current trouble area for X.

Ultimately, getting smooth resizing is going to involve a combination of proper synchronization, double buffer, and good resize handling in the toolkit. With those factors in place, resize will become reflow limited, which shouldn't be a problem for the vast majority of applications. Unfortunately, all these pieces could take awhile to fall into place. I believe Reverman's work implements the synchronization spec, but I don't know if double-buffering is handled very efficiently, and I'm pretty sure GTK+'s handling of resize events hasn't improved any lately. A major hurdle has been graphics drivers, since the lack of good open-source drivers for modern cards has meant that its been very hard for X developers to experiment with ways to get the graphics driver to cooperate with the double-buffered windowing system.

Reply Score: 5

superstoned Member since:
2005-07-07

maybe you could send the Kwin patch to a mailinglist or attach it to a bugreport? someone might be willing to pick it up...

Reply Score: 1

design in open source projects
by rcb1 on Wed 8th Feb 2006 01:00 UTC
rcb1
Member since:
2006-02-08

Dan Winship's comments depict what is wrong with open source software development. Good software is almost invariably conceived and developed by a small number of people. Too many cooks spoil the broth.

Reply Score: 0

archiesteel Member since:
2005-07-02

Dan Winship's comments depict what is wrong with open source software development. Good software is almost invariably conceived and developed by a small number of people. Too many cooks spoil the broth.

First, open source does not necessarily mean open development, though this is usually the case.

Next, what you say isn't true for many projects. The Linux kernel is a good example, KDE is another good one. It can work either way.

Most open source projects are small, not because it makes for better code, but because the scope is more limited (which can still provide some great apps - K3b comes to mind).

Reply Score: 2

rcb1 Member since:
2006-02-08

< ..open source does not necessarily mean open development..>

Open source does refer to the development method. Many of the open source advocates in fact point to community involvement as the reason for the alleged superiority of open source software (e.g. cathedral and bazaar). Novell just said 'screw the community' and they came out with a good product in a short time. That ought to shut some people up.

As for the software you mentioned, I don't necessarily think linux kernel or kde are any good, though I don't know how many are involved in either. k3b is OK.

Reply Score: 0

nzjrs Member since:
2006-01-02

I dont really think Novell said "screw the community" they will after all contribute this back to gnome.

I think they said "lets temporally screw the community devel process so we can make our ship date"

Time will tell in the end if the two statements are in fact equivilent

Reply Score: 1

rcb1 Member since:
2006-02-08

I meant they said "screw the community input". It should give pause to anyone that thinks putting a hundred people together is all there is to quality software development. That covers most open source supporters!

Reply Score: 1

archiesteel Member since:
2005-07-02

Open source does refer to the development method.

It can, but not necessarily. The "rules" are a lot more flexible than you seem to believe.

As soon as the code is available to look at an modify, it doesn't really matter if previous development was done behind closed doors. The code has been "open sourced".

This is what happened with Xgl. Novell did some work behind closed doors, which may have annoyed some, but the code is now available for all, and we can expect that people outside of the project will contribute to it.

Novell just said 'screw the community'

Novell did not do that at all. I think you're misunderstanding (or misrepresenting) their intentions in order to support your own anti-open source views.

As for the software you mentioned, I don't necessarily think linux kernel or kde are any good

That's a matter of opinion, not fact. I happen to think that these are excellent pieces of software.

Reply Score: 2

rcb1 Member since:
2006-02-08

< It can, but not necessarily. The "rules" are a lot more flexible than you seem to believe. >

You have it wrong. Read Cathedral and Bazaar. Community participation is what distinguishes open source projects from other kinds, and is supposedly what gives it its alleged advantages. This is what the Open Source supporters have been telling the world for a long time!

Novell said 'screw community participation', came out with a good product in a short time, and are now saying community participation would have slowed them down!!

<I happen to think that these are excellent pieces of software.>

I'm just pointing out that I'm not buying your proof that large groups can produce good programs from the examples you gave.

Reply Score: 1

smitty Member since:
2005-10-13

I think the point is that while initial development of Xgl was not open source, Bazaar type development, it has now been opened up. Novell clearly isn't completely against community participation because they are now welcoming it. They just thought that the initial start would be better off just being done by someone rather than having lots of discussion about how to do it the "right" way first. Something I happen to agree with. But in the long term Novell seems to be saying that the Bazaar is the right way to go in order to maintain and improve what was initially created.

Regarding large groups ability to produce good programs - I think there is no question that they CAN produce good programs. The only questions are whether they are more likely to do so than small groups and whether they are able to create the really (rare) outstanding pieces of software.

Reply Score: 1

archiesteel Member since:
2005-07-02

Exactly. The Xgl development Novell did is NOW open-sourced. So Novell didn't say "screw you" to the community, but rather gave a gift to the community - despite what some anti-open source posters are saying...

Reply Score: 1

rcb1 Member since:
2006-02-08

< I think the point is that while initial development of Xgl was not open source, Bazaar type development, it has now been opened up. >

But this invalidates the oft-repeated claim that collaborative development is what gives rise to the superior quality of open source programs. Novell says it wastes time!

Reply Score: 1

smitty Member since:
2005-10-13

I'm having trouble seeing if you are being serious or just trying to troll.

In case you really haven't heard what I've been saying: But this invalidates the oft-repeated claim that collaborative development is what gives rise to the superior quality of open source programs. Novell says it wastes time!

NO!!! Novell only said it wastes time at the beginning, when you are creating something from scratch. Novell DID NOT say that in the long run it would be better to stay closed source. In fact, they've done the opposite and are letting the community modify code and take over the job of maintaining it.

People generally say that collaborative development is good for 2 reasons - 1: Lots of ideas, people can figure out the best way to do something before someone makes a stupid design mistake. Novell says this just wastes time. 2: Lots of eyes looking at the code thats already been produced, finding errors, improving performance, adding features. Novell seems to agree with this, no doubt especially because they won't have to pay anything for it.

Novell says that there are downsides to collaborative development, but it is a gross distortion to twist that around and say that there is NO upside either.


Personally, I think different projects call for different types of development. In this case it seems that Novell was correct, they've managed to get the ball rolling when no one else could. Or at least faster. But that doesn't mean that it is the only way to do something. I think the community can sometimes get projects going as well that any one individual might not be able to, and that corporations might not be interested in.

Reply Score: 1

Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

Next, what you say isn't true for many projects. The Linux kernel is a good example

No it's not. The actual Vanilla kernel gets developped by only a small group of Torvalds-approved developers.

Now, if you combine all kernels (also distribution-specific ones) you'd have a point.

Reply Score: 5

archiesteel Member since:
2005-07-02

No it's not. The actual Vanilla kernel gets developped by only a small group of Torvalds-approved developers.

Well, I guess it depends what you consider "small". To me, small is under 10 programmers. Clearly, from looking at the changelogs published on the LKML, the Linux kernel employs much more than 10 developers...

Perhaps it'd be a good idea to frame this debate better, because otherwise it'll go nhowhere.

Reply Score: 1

Howie S
Member since:
2005-07-14

...from here.

I'm so happy to hear of xgl's public release. Very excited!

I look forward to eventually testing out a live-CD to see the difference in responsiveness as compared to standard, non-accelerated X. I'm not too interested in the cube eye-candy, as much as having a responsive desktop without "downgrading" (no offence) from KDE or GNOME to a more lightweight window manager like WindowMaker of XFCE (both of which are fine projects.)

So, is mesa-solo part of the future for the desktop anytime soon?

Reply Score: 1

Novell competes against Red Hat
by tyrione on Wed 8th Feb 2006 05:32 UTC
tyrione
Member since:
2005-11-21

It stands to reason that they would leverage GNOME since GNOME is the DE for RedHat Enterprise as well.

With that being stated, the end user can always use both KDE and GNOME.

Reply Score: 1

Hooray for Novell
by REMF on Wed 8th Feb 2006 12:43 UTC
REMF
Member since:
2006-02-05

for taking a stalled project and turning it around so quickly.

............... but i'll be interested when I can use it in a KDE SUSE release!

Reply Score: 1

Right result wrong path, great for all!
by Guppetto on Wed 8th Feb 2006 15:21 UTC
Guppetto
Member since:
2005-07-06

Horray, XGL is here and it's great that we now have it, and he's right in saying taking it behind closed doors was the fastest way to make it happen, however that step was fundamentaly wrong.

When i say wrong, I mean they didn't have to go behind closed doors to make it happen or meet their schedule. In truth, all they had to say is was hey, were going to go work on XGL for NDL 10. Were going to set up a repository, and every so often were going to do a code commit, but we aren't going to commit the source until we have somthing meaningful. A couple of commits latter, and some good press and they'd have been called heros.

However, the truth is that they wanted to reconstruct XGL in the manor that they felt was best, without consideration for dissenting oppinions. What people seem to miss is that when your writing code there is nothing that forces you to include other people's ideas. It's not what you do, it's how you do it. They could have still done it there way, but at least they would have heard some other ideas that they may have found usefull. Open development (communication of varied ideas) is like good advise, you can consider it and include it in your decision making, or you can exclude it all together; but when you limit your view of the world just to achieve a desired goal two things usually happen.

1) you'll quickly achieve your desired goal
2) The goal you've so diligently persued might not be a fit for the ever changing world (group of people who's goals really are to solve the fundamental problems of xorg in this case, as opposed to arguing just to argue)

Novel wasn't wrong for doing what they did, and the results are fantastic, but it doesn't change the fact that they didn't have to take their ball and run home until things could be done their way.

Reply Score: 1

RE: KDE4
by REMF on Wed 8th Feb 2006 16:37 UTC
REMF
Member since:
2006-02-05

"Aaeron Seigo said he was happy with the outcome and that he thought there is enough time to integrate Xgl into KDE 4."

the question is; when will KDE4 arrive.

I would like it to arrive in time for the big-three's Oct 2006 release, but i doubt we'll be that lucky. ;)

Reply Score: 1