Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 17th Jul 2006 11:06 UTC, submitted by AdamR01
SuSE, openSUSE Since yesterday, .iso downloads for SUSE Enterprise Linux Desktop/Server 10 have been available from Novell's download page. After seeking confirmation from Novell's Nat Friedman, we can confirm these are indeed the final releases. SLED 10 is available for x86 and x86-64, while SLES 10 can be obtained for x86, AMD64/EM64T, PPC, IBM Power, Itanium, and IBM's zSeries. According to Friedman, a "big marketing blitz" will happen today. OSNews reviewed the RC3 release of SLED 10 in two stages not too long ago.
Order by: Score:
FINALLY
by rx182 on Mon 17th Jul 2006 11:22 UTC
rx182
Member since:
2005-07-08

This is such a great news. I hope they fixed all the issues with the package manager. This is gonna be a killer release.

Installing it in a few hours ;-)

Reply Score: 2

RE: FINALLY
by Thom_Holwerda on Mon 17th Jul 2006 11:24 UTC in reply to "FINALLY"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

I already updated my RC3 release yesterday eve (there's benefits to getting all the news first, not in th eleast place being the first to be able to download something at full speed ;) ), and besides the usual glitches all rpm-based dist-upgrades seem to suffer from, it went pretty fine.

I do recommend to do fresh installs though!

Reply Score: 1

Registration
by mariux on Mon 17th Jul 2006 11:33 UTC
mariux
Member since:
2005-11-13

Whats up with the mandatory comprehensive registration?

Reply Score: 1

RE: Registration
by Thom_Holwerda on Mon 17th Jul 2006 11:35 UTC in reply to "Registration"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

It is needed for recieving updates. And since they do not include the nVIDIA/ATI drivers on the installation media but in a seperate download repository (probably due to legal restrictions), you NEED access to their updates in order to get Xgl going.

Edited 2006-07-17 11:36

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Registration
by thebluesgnr on Mon 17th Jul 2006 12:43 UTC in reply to "RE: Registration"
thebluesgnr Member since:
2005-11-14

The nVidia packages are available for manual installation if you don't care to register: ftp://download.nvidia.com/novell.

It's worth mentioning that Intel drivers are Free software so they can be distributed with SLED. Xgl works great with them too.

Reply Score: 3

Awesome
by liamdawe on Mon 17th Jul 2006 11:47 UTC
liamdawe
Member since:
2006-07-04

This is good news, i may try it out sometime and see if i like it more than ubuntu.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Registration
by alourenco on Mon 17th Jul 2006 12:03 UTC
alourenco
Member since:
2006-07-17

"you NEED access to their updates in order to get Xgl going."

You can manually install 3D drivers from ATI/nVidia and enable XGL later! I did this with ATI drivers before noticing how to enable updates...

Reply Score: 4

It appears...
by rm6990 on Mon 17th Jul 2006 12:19 UTC
rm6990
Member since:
2005-07-04

It appears that Novell's web servers are not handling the load very well.

So is Novell charging a fee to be able to use the product (as in this being a demo) or have they removed the fees completely? The servers are too slow to check myself.

Reply Score: 1

RE: It appears...
by thebluesgnr on Mon 17th Jul 2006 12:40 UTC in reply to "It appears..."
thebluesgnr Member since:
2005-11-14

You're free to use the product. I don't know if their update channels will be open for everyone though, I heard they aren't for NLD9.

If they changed this for this release it will become quite popular, I predict. ;)

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: It appears...
by kaiwai on Tue 18th Jul 2006 05:27 UTC in reply to "RE: It appears..."
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

You're free to use the product. I don't know if their update channels will be open for everyone though, I heard they aren't for NLD9.

They could do it like Caldera did for their desktop; charge for the binary updates, but you can download the source rpms for free; for most people here, you simply download the source rpm, go rpm --rebuild and voila, you have a sexy new package ready to be installed.

Reply Score: 1

RE: It appears...
by Anonymous Penguin on Mon 17th Jul 2006 12:40 UTC in reply to "It appears..."
Anonymous Penguin Member since:
2005-07-06

You can download and use SLED 10
You can also get a free Evaluation Activation Code in order to download updates(you can use it for 15 days, if I am not wrong).
Hower you must buy one if you want to get unlimited updates.

Reply Score: 2

RE: It appears...
by HeLfReZ on Mon 17th Jul 2006 12:54 UTC in reply to "It appears..."
HeLfReZ Member since:
2005-08-12

I agree, inquiring minds will want to know the scope on how updates and activation will be handled. I believe with NLD9 the evalutions were good for 30days of updates, at which point you would need to purchase a e-license to continue receiving updates. Novell seems to be playing coy with the information on SLED 10.

Initial information pointed to a price point of $59 for distro. NLD9 was $59/year for updates..It will be very interesting to see how they handle SLED10. Eventhough SLED is mainly aimed at corporate users, I think it has alot of potential for the general consumer. I don't think, however, that most consumers would want to pay $59 every year for updates eventhough its not a substantial amount. Their best bet is to stick with volume licensing and pricing for corporate usage and offer one-time license fees to consumers. I guess moer information will come in the next few weeks. As it stands, I can't find anyplace to actually "purchase" SLED10 on the website.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: It appears...
by anandrajan on Mon 17th Jul 2006 13:09 UTC in reply to "RE: It appears..."
anandrajan Member since:
2006-05-12

On http://download.novell.com/Download?buildid=N1YveG_t53Y~ it says that the activation code is valid for 60 days in order to access product updates but does not include Novell Support Services.

On http://www.novell.com/products/desktop/howtobuy.html you can find subscription options

Reply Score: 4

RE[3]: It appears...
by HeLfReZ on Mon 17th Jul 2006 14:06 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: It appears..."
HeLfReZ Member since:
2005-08-12

Ok Now pricing has been updated, but initially when I checked this morning, the website had not been updated with the pricing info, the Novell shop only had NLD9 listed for purchase...cool

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: It appears...
by macisaac on Mon 17th Jul 2006 13:13 UTC in reply to "RE: It appears..."
macisaac Member since:
2005-08-28

here you go:

http://www.novell.com/linux/ready.html

just click on the buy now links.

my question is educational pricing, what is it? I know for redhat enterprise, the difference is staggering ($50/server for edu sites). if suse wants to make inroads in there, they'd need quite the discount from their regular pricing.

Reply Score: 1

Proxy
by IanSVT on Mon 17th Jul 2006 12:24 UTC
IanSVT
Member since:
2005-07-06

My proxy server is going to be crying today.

Reply Score: 1

looks good
by timalot on Mon 17th Jul 2006 12:44 UTC
timalot
Member since:
2006-07-17

Looks impresive from the osnews review... but i dont't ill ever use a system using rpm's ... no matter how much the windows wobble!

Reply Score: 1

RE: looks good
by Anonymous Penguin on Mon 17th Jul 2006 13:01 UTC in reply to "looks good"
Anonymous Penguin Member since:
2005-07-06

From a *long time* Debian user: these days Debian and all its derivatives are far too buggy for my tastes.
Besides if you happen to have a dual core, 64bit processor, it will be supported very well by SLED 10.

Reply Score: 1

RE: looks good
by macisaac on Mon 17th Jul 2006 13:23 UTC in reply to "looks good"
macisaac Member since:
2005-08-28

that's a little silly of you ;-) if you use a deb based system, you do realize that the only real difference between them is that rpms use cpio, whereas debs use ar. what people generally confuse are the delivery mechanism, such as yum or apt for the packaging format. that's different.

(if you ever want to see the innards of an rpm, just do an rpm2cpio foo.rpm | cpio -id and take a look. also, do the same with an srpm and see how they're built.)

that said, rpms are incredibly useful for the things you can do with them. things like the --query options are incredibly useful, as are verification checks with the -V option. nice stuff really.

Reply Score: 5

This is good news
by unoengborg on Mon 17th Jul 2006 13:16 UTC
unoengborg
Member since:
2005-07-06

It will be a worthy competitor to Vista when/if it is released next year, but the most significant effect on the SLED is probably that it will set a new standard for what usability to be expected from a Desktop OS.

This means that, other Linux distros, and perhaps even Apple will need to move their positions in usability forward to compete.

We saw the same effect after the rise of Ubuntu. To me Ubunto appeared as one of the first distros developed with ordinary users in mind. It was much more focused than other distros of the time, as it concentrated on a few good apps that worked well toghether instead of offerering a smorgasbord of applications where some flavors didn't always go well together.

Ubunto stressed the need for good defaults. Back in the pre Ubuntu days, the answer "but you can configure it" was good enough when sombody pointed out some kind of usability problem. Today most developers are aware of the importance of good defaults. This new Novell thing will further stress the importance of usability among the developer community.

Just like Ubuntu had a big impact on the Linux landscape. I expect this new Novell/SUSE distro will make a lot of difference. It was designed from ground up with the business user in mind. Proper usability testing was done. The new XGL stuff may not add much usability, but they look cool and might get people, that otherwise wouldn't have given Linux, a thought curious enough to try it. When they do they will find that the modern Linux desktop is a very capable and ussable system.

By the time, Vista gets out, many distros will have followed and have more usable products on the market or in the pipeline. For one thing Red Hat will have to shape up. Their current version feels (and is) very old.

This is a big problem for all Linux, as many companies will only use Linux distros from wich they can get full 24/7 world wide support. Red Hat and Novell are the only ones commonly known to be able to do that, and as such, they represent the face of Linux to the corporate world.

Reply Score: 5

RE: This is good news
by netpython on Mon 17th Jul 2006 14:12 UTC in reply to "This is good news"
netpython Member since:
2005-07-06

Exactly.A good example to follow is needed.Perhaps SLED10 sets the bar.

Reply Score: 1

RE: This is good news
by liamdawe on Mon 17th Jul 2006 14:43 UTC in reply to "This is good news"
liamdawe Member since:
2006-07-04

Everything you said i beleive is correct, i beleive Fedora Core is actually a close contender to ubuntu.

Redhat really needs to shape up...

Reply Score: 1

RE: This is good news
by butters on Tue 18th Jul 2006 07:24 UTC in reply to "This is good news"
butters Member since:
2005-07-08

Right. I think most of us would agree that the big three commercial Linux vendors (Red Hat, Novell, and now I include Canonical) are really starting to do a good job of fostering strong communities and producing impressive releases. Through more-or-less different approaches, each has recently begun to strike a good balance between the needs of their commercial products and the needs of their respective communities. At last, the commercial Linux vendors are ready to work with the community, and the community is ready to work with the commercial Linux vendors. This is a very important trend for the free software movement.

The proprietary Linux vendors are a whole other animal. Of course, the vision largely shared by Xandros and Linspire appeals to a lot of users and more OSS developers than you might think. What makes them different from the commerical vendors is that the features that they develop to make their product unique are largely proprietary, whereas the commercial vendors open source most of what they develop. These vendors serve the needs of the Linux Desktop market pretty well, but they don't serve the needs of the community.

At least Xandros has no intentions of trying to develop a community. Linspire doesn't really understand why they're facing so much criticism for their Freespire project. When people tell them that they need to have a more transparent development process, they post a link to an ftp server with source isos.

One would think that the advantage of being able to include proprietary software would make the proprietary Linux distributions so much more appealing than the free as in speech distros. However, these companies have largely failed in using this opportunity to produce innovative products. They mostly use their proprietary agreements to provide free as in beer proprietary add-ons out of the box. The few value-add features are generally Windows emulation, Windows migration, and Windows-inspired bloatware.

This review of Xandros read like a laundry list of bugs and limitations with a positive introduction and conclusion tacked on. Did anyone (who read the review) get the same impression?

Reply Score: 2

RE: This is good news
by butters on Tue 18th Jul 2006 07:26 UTC in reply to "This is good news"
butters Member since:
2005-07-08

Doh, I went way off topic with that previous post because I forgot I wasn't still reading the Xandros thread. Sorry...

Reply Score: 1

which cd's are required
by steve23063 on Mon 17th Jul 2006 14:11 UTC
steve23063
Member since:
2006-02-11

do you NEED all 5 cds?

Reply Score: 1

RE: which cd's are required
by SlackerJack on Mon 17th Jul 2006 14:38 UTC in reply to "which cd's are required"
SlackerJack Member since:
2005-11-12

Three cd's for a default install, thats all you need.

Reply Score: 2

The prices
by onjoo on Mon 17th Jul 2006 14:19 UTC
onjoo
Member since:
2006-07-14

Suse Linux enterprise Desktop (SLED)
e-License - 1 Device - 1 Year Subscription - $50.00 / 39.48EUR
e-License - 1 Device - 3 Year Subscription - $125.00 / 98.69EUR

Thats the price for update subscriptions/support.

You can download the images for free (as long you have an account), but you will need activation code for updates and nvidia/ati drivers. You can choose the 60 day eval for free, or buy the e-license to get it fully working for a year or three.

Remember that this is an enterprise distribution! If interested in Free version download the Suse Linux 10.1

The Suse Linux Enterprise Server,SLES, (think of Redhat enterprise) costs even more:
1 Year Subscription - $349.00
3 Year Subscription - $873.00

Reply Score: 2

RE: The prices
by somebody on Mon 17th Jul 2006 14:39 UTC in reply to "The prices"
somebody Member since:
2005-07-07

Suse Linux enterprise Desktop (SLED)
e-License - 1 Device - 1 Year Subscription - $50.00 / 39.48EUR
e-License - 1 Device - 3 Year Subscription - $125.00 / 98.69EUR


Well, I don't use Suse. But project definitelly deserves to be bought. If not for anything other, IT IS A FIRST FRIGGIN' COMPANY THAT CAN CALCULATE $ TO EUR CORRECTLY. All others just use 1$=1EUR.

Hail, Novell. Many thanks, and god bless you for showing how EUR should be calculated from $.

Reply Score: 5

Novell Marketing Blitz
by segedunum on Mon 17th Jul 2006 15:22 UTC
segedunum
Member since:
2005-07-06

According to Friedman, a "big marketing blitz" will happen today.

Considering Novell's past performance in this area, this should be good to watch.

Reply Score: 2

DVD ISOs and other RPM repositories?
by luquette on Mon 17th Jul 2006 15:37 UTC
luquette
Member since:
2006-01-04

I'm eternally grateful that the final release offers DVD ISOs in addition to the small army of CD ISOs; coastering 5 CDs per release candidate was one of my biggest complaints when initially using the distribution.

On the other hand, I've got a question: where should I go about finding information on extra repositories? Should SLED 10 users point YaST at the OpenSUSE repositories to get packages that aren't included on the CD set, or is there a separate SLED package repository?

Reply Score: 1

elsewhere Member since:
2005-07-13

On the other hand, I've got a question: where should I go about finding information on extra repositories? Should SLED 10 users point YaST at the OpenSUSE repositories to get packages that aren't included on the CD set, or is there a separate SLED package repository?

You should be able to use the openSUSE repos, though they are not "officially" supported. The core libraries and apps in SLED and SL 10.1 are the same.

You may run into the odd dependency issue though due to some different naming conventions between SLED and SL, but no doubt the community will figure that out soon.

Reply Score: 1

HeLfReZ Member since:
2005-08-12

Being that this is intended to be a "corporate" desktop, I doubt that Novell with be providing and "extras" repositories. With most releases, the DVD version does tend to include a few more packages than the cd version, but nothing on the same grounds as extras you would find with openSUSE.

That being said SLED and SLES are based on openSUSE 10, so it should technically be safe to use 10.0 repositories, but I would tred VERY lightly when choosing packages and erpositories. The major benefit of enterprise class systems is stability and control, therefore, the more random packages you add to the system, the more likely you are to introduce some unknown variables and chances for problems into the system.

I would not recommend loading up the latest laundry list of openSUSE repositories and loading up on all the latest greatest packages for your favorite programs as it could adversely affect the performance of this "enterprise" system. But a few choices packages shouldnt hurt it, afterall it IS just openSUSE with a big spitshine...I would lean towards 10.0 packages( edit I think its more of a cousin to 10.1, so its hard to guage which will be best suited), or even better, wait and see if packagers pickup on SLED10 and start including it in their builds...I think that you will to see community packages for SLED alot sooner than you think!!

Edited 2006-07-17 15:59

Reply Score: 2

Anonymous Penguin Member since:
2005-07-06

I have already used the apt repos for OpenSUSE 10.1 together with SLED 10, no problems at all:

ftp://ftp4.gwdg.de/pub/linux/suse/apt/SuSE/

Reply Score: 2

Ron
by IanSVT on Mon 17th Jul 2006 16:10 UTC
IanSVT
Member since:
2005-07-06

I got an email from Big Ron Hovsepian about the release. I feel so special. ;)

Reply Score: 2

OpenSuse cleared for take off
by Guppetto on Mon 17th Jul 2006 17:30 UTC
Guppetto
Member since:
2005-07-06

I've been using SLED for two Weeks now with the OpenSuse and Novel update repositories running concurently, and they have been nearly identical. In fact, the only way your going to get full multimedia support in SLED is to point to the OpenSUSE repositories. Novel can turn their repositories off, anytime they like for the average user and it won't be a problem. If you need the enterprise applications such as the iRas client, VNC and a host of others, the OpenSUSE repositories are not going to work for you. If someone would port the menu applet (SLAB) I think the enterprise desktop could be passed over all together for most, but having used it and its integrated beagle functionality, average users really are better with it than without it. Gnome should really make the switch to including it with their standard menu, because it makes finding apps and files so much easier, though it does take a little getting use to. SLED is a good desktop and once gnome 2.14 gets integrated, it's going to be even more solid. Also, if you want to run XGL, I'd use the modified version by the developers over at http://www.compiz.net/, becuase they take the standard novel snapshots of XGL and Compiz and modify them with all sorts of goodness, to really unlock the full power of XGL. In other words, they make the eye candy really usefull with all the plugins your heart can stomach.

Reply Score: 3

SLED vs. SL 10.1 Packages
by elsewhere on Mon 17th Jul 2006 19:33 UTC
elsewhere
Member since:
2005-07-13

If it helps, here's a link that was posted on planetsuse a couple of weeks ago outlining the differences in packages between SLED/SLES and SL 10.1 (DVD).

http://disruptive.org.uk/20060709.packages/sle10-10.1-dvd.html

Reply Score: 3

Site overloaded
by mkools on Mon 17th Jul 2006 20:45 UTC
mkools
Member since:
2005-10-11

The site seems a little busy at the moment.
Does anybody have a link to a torrent file?

I can't wait to get my hands on this release.
It feels like a long time ago when I was starting my upgrade from Windows 98 to Windows 2000 ;)

Reply Score: 2

Server is choking
by hraq on Tue 18th Jul 2006 00:22 UTC
hraq
Member since:
2005-07-06

The server is not responding and doesn't support resume, do anyone have a torrent to relief the server?

Reply Score: 1

Finally
by ChrisA on Tue 18th Jul 2006 04:18 UTC
ChrisA
Member since:
2006-05-06

A true desktop is delivered. SLED 10 surpasses Windows Vista and Mac OS X. Windows Vista is a joke spo its days are numbered and SLED 10 is sure to steal what littlke bit of Marketshare Apple has. Good night Apple and Microsoft, dont go away mad, just go away.

Reply Score: 0

RE: Finally
by kaiwai on Tue 18th Jul 2006 05:31 UTC in reply to "Finally "
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

So is this "ChrisA" the marketing blitz that Friedman is talking about; gotta admit, its better than their last attempts.

Reply Score: 2

I give up
by steve23063 on Tue 18th Jul 2006 06:05 UTC
steve23063
Member since:
2006-02-11

my review after 15 min of use and why I give up on trying anymore linux distros:

- openoffice has a long way to go compared to office 2007 beta 2 or office 2003...also takes 10x longer to load than office2k3/2k7 for some reason
- the side buttons on my mouse wouldn't work so I couldn't navigate back and forth through webpages like I like to
- audigy 2 sound card (vanilla) was detected as audigy 2 platinum but no sound available. had to use mobo's onboard sound as usual with linux distros (except ubuntu dapper drake)
- the default player totem failed to play my mpegs, avis or wmvs. wmvs I can understand but come on the others are standard video formats
- xgl was sluggish because ATI cards aren't as well supported as NVIDIA
- OS in general was slow. i.e. small but noticeable lags when you click "computer" or "more applications" in the slab menu even though I have 1GB RAM and 2.2GHz processor
- hibernation and standby still don't work on my laptop
- The list goes on and on...

over the years, I've tried slackware, mandrake, suse, ubuntu (dapper drake=favorite) but they all have problems. It's the little things that tick people off. Why can't they get mice (all buttons, not just half or most), printers, soundcards and 3d acceleration detected reliably yet? Windows and OSX provide working hardware ALL the time and you don't have to fiddle around with system files...because you shouldn't. those things should be automatic. I shouldn't have to google "CUPS" so I can do research and agonize over figuring out how to scan/print a letter on my all-in-one printer.

To the ppl comparing SLED10 or any linux distro to Vista and OSX..vista is still in beta and no one's even previewed Apple's Leopard! You guys are so lame and desparate for a decent OS and that just proves it. Btw, what you think about the visuals is irrelevant. My XP system looks nothing like the default and Vista will be even more customizable. You can make it very plain jane or super snazzy. Win2k, OSX, XP (and hopefully Vista and Leopard when they're done) are stable, fast, easily customizeable, have so much support from software and hardware vendors, and most importantly, just work once you install them.

edit: Don't put the blame on software/hardware vendors either. When they feel linux distros (for desktop use, I'm not talking about server use) aren't pieces of slop code that only .0001% of the population uses (aka hardcore nerds with lots of time to play with system config files) maybe they'll pay attention and make software and device drivers that are tailored for linux.

Edited 2006-07-18 06:17

Reply Score: 0

XP is poor for hardware support out-of-the-box
by rklrkl on Tue 18th Jul 2006 09:11 UTC in reply to "I give up"
rklrkl Member since:
2005-07-06

> Windows and OSX provide working hardware ALL the time and you don't have to fiddle around with system files...

Funny, cos my Nvidia NForce 4 motherboard (with Athlon 64) - quite a common motherboard from a major manufacturer - in my Acer PC didn't have either its onboard Ethernet *or* sound recognised by Windows XP Professional Service Pack 2! Even the early Vista releases failed to recognise both as well! Slap on any current Linux distro and - voila - both network and sound were recognised and worked perfectly. Shame on XP!

Solution? I ended up having to go to www.nvidia.com in *Linux*, download the drivers for network and sound and then boot back into Windows and install them. Ho hum - Linux out of the box is waaay better than XP for getting hardware working. XP only "wins" if you're willing to fish out a driver CD (Acer don't give you one) or go to the manufacturer's Website (lucky I knew it was an Nvidia mobo, cos Acer do their best to hide that fact - Sisoft Sandra won't even tell you it's an Nvidia mobo, but you can guess it from the onboard components) and download a driver (which is no good if it's a network driver you're after, like I was).

Reply Score: 3

I gave up windows
by mbkumar on Tue 18th Jul 2006 23:04 UTC in reply to "I give up"
mbkumar Member since:
2006-06-28

>Don't put the blame on software/hardware vendors either..

I got an asus nForce4 mobo and I had infinite trouble to make windows xp work. After installation, instead of getting login screen, all I got was a blank screen (No signal to monitor). I tried, tried, tried and gave up. I cleaned HD and installed Suse 10.1 and it worked right out of box.
Whom shall I blame now?

>Why can't they get mice (all buttons, not just half or most), printers, soundcards and 3d acceleration detected reliably yet?
You know the answer. It's in your post only.
>maybe they'll pay attention and make software and device drivers that are tailored for linux.
There is a choice available. Most of the hardware on my machine is latest (dual core Opteron, nVidia 76xx card...) and everything works on linux. I chose nVidia over ATI because of linux support, bought a linux compatible wireless card and I am all happy.

Reply Score: 1

PPC
by kaiwai on Tue 18th Jul 2006 06:52 UTC
kaiwai
Member since:
2005-07-06

In regards to the PowerPC version, its only available in the server form, is there any difference between SLED and SLES? is it basically SLED + kernel server patches + server applications, but by enlarge, it has the same cool desktop as SLED?

Reply Score: 1

RE: PPC
by luquette on Tue 18th Jul 2006 17:45 UTC in reply to "PPC"
luquette Member since:
2006-01-04

Kernel servers generally choose to be more lazy about thread pre-empting. In a nutshell, this causes less overhead on the server (because the scheduler makes pre-emption checks less often), but causes a loss in how responsive the system feels.

For typical server applications, network latency causes thread swapping latency to be completely negligible; on the desktop, you're more likely to notice the difference. Even so, it's important to note that kernel pre-empted threads don't make or break a desktop's feel--and to add to that, responsiveness is highly subjective.

Reply Score: 1

Just to confirm.........
by REMF on Tue 18th Jul 2006 07:47 UTC
REMF
Member since:
2006-02-05

is it merely the support/updates I pay for, but i can download and install/use SLED 10 with no hassle and for as long as i want?

regards

Reply Score: 1

Re-post
by pollycat on Tue 18th Jul 2006 07:49 UTC
pollycat
Member since:
2006-06-27

Butters, can you re-post your comment above in the Xandros thread? Then we can discuss it - thanks!

Reply Score: 1

RE: This is good news
by collinm on Tue 18th Jul 2006 15:31 UTC
collinm
Member since:
2005-07-15

ubuntu as not really the first distribution with joe six pack in mind.....

the first one was corel linux

mandriva, xandros, linspire, suse a lot more user friendly than ubuntu

Reply Score: 2

where is kde
by collinm on Tue 18th Jul 2006 15:36 UTC
collinm
Member since:
2005-07-15

on all review i see about sled 10, i don't see kde screenshot...

all my user use kde and don't want gnome

Reply Score: 2

RE: where is kde
by Morty on Tue 18th Jul 2006 18:34 UTC in reply to "where is kde"
Morty Member since:
2005-07-06

As usual it looks like most of the "reviewers" pop in the CDs/DVD and click next, next etc. Without actually do anything other than ohhing or bitching about the process in large parts of the review. Followed by little bit of complaining or praise for hardware that don't or do work. Then they do some random clicking followed by the usual ohhing or bitching about menu layout and other superficial issues.

If you want KDE shots you can try Novell's own pages, like these:
http://www.novell.com/documentation/beta/sled10/pdfdoc/kdequick/kde...
http://www.novell.com/documentation/beta/sled10/pdfdoc/userguide_kd...

Edited 2006-07-18 18:36

Reply Score: 2

just to confirm............ (part two)
by REMF on Wed 19th Jul 2006 07:35 UTC
REMF
Member since:
2006-02-05

is it merely the support/updates I pay for, but i can download and install/use SLED 10 with no hassle and for as long as i want?

regards

R3MF

Reply Score: 1

fynali
Member since:
2006-07-21

I’ve been trying out SLES/SLED 10 (since pre-release, and now the final release).

Some of the applications that I was trying to install are not available on the catalogs on CD (apps like thunderbird, lighttpd…). I tried using openSUSE 10.1 YaST installation sources. Sure enough they’re available there, and installs on SLE[SD] 10; but I think they break LSB compliance or introduce other glitches… and strictly speaking, they aren’t packaged for SLE[SD] 10; moreover, it is not right way to do it in a production environment.

Are there any YaST/rug online installation sources for SLE[SD] 10?

Reply Score: 1