Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 15th Oct 2006 21:52 UTC, submitted by Matthew Yohnovich
Slackware, Slax "Zenwalk 3 is an operating system based on Patrick Volkerding's Slackware GNU/Linux distribution, version 10.2. The entire operating system fits on a single CD, and stays true to what the author calls the 'Zen philosophy'. This philosophy, as it has been coined, refers to Zenwalk's policy of including one application per task. I've had a few problems with Slackware and Slackware-related systems in the past, but Zenwalk has alleviated all of my stress regarding those issues. Here's why."
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super fast and stable...
by pistooli on Sun 15th Oct 2006 22:07 UTC
pistooli
Member since:
2005-07-09

my choice of Linux on not so recent hardware... :-) give it a try if you have not yet...

Reply Score: 1

RE: super fast and stable...
by hhcv on Sun 15th Oct 2006 22:43 UTC in reply to "super fast and stable..."
hhcv Member since:
2005-11-12

yes sir

Reply Score: 1

Very fast and Stable
by Jedd on Sun 15th Oct 2006 23:32 UTC
Jedd
Member since:
2005-07-06

Great on old and new hardware, netpkg is a great little tool, although I wish that there was lots more software to choose from. Being based on SlackWare was what got me to try this great little distro in the fisrt place, being a lonetime SlackWare user myself. On a scale of 1 to 10 (1 being the worst, 10 being the best), I'd rate ZenWalk Linux a solid 9.

Reply Score: 1

v RE: Very fast and Stable
by patpi on Mon 16th Oct 2006 14:51 UTC in reply to "Very fast and Stable"
RE[2]: Very fast and Stable
by adapt on Mon 16th Oct 2006 22:05 UTC in reply to "RE: Very fast and Stable"
adapt Member since:
2005-07-06

i like how you joined the same day you commented... you with the kateOS project? ;)

Reply Score: 1

Live cd?
by zizban on Mon 16th Oct 2006 00:34 UTC
zizban
Member since:
2005-07-06

Is there a live CD of this?

Reply Score: 1

RE: Live cd?
by Morgan on Mon 16th Oct 2006 16:40 UTC in reply to "Live cd?"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29
Re: Live CD
by zizban on Mon 16th Oct 2006 01:01 UTC
zizban
Member since:
2005-07-06

Okay, got my own answer and there is:
http://www.zenlive.tuxfamily.org/

Reply Score: 2

Linux between purity and utilitarianism
by nedvis on Mon 16th Oct 2006 02:46 UTC
nedvis
Member since:
2006-01-02

It seems to be a trend in Linux world: offshots, forked or remastered distributions tends to be better than their origins ( source distros), whatever the word better should stand for.
You know what I mean : Ubuntu is better than Debian,
PSLinuxOS is bettern than Mandriva as PSBSD is better than FreeBSD (just to mention Unix ) etc.
And Zenwalk Linux is not an exception in that regards.
Although I really like Partick Wolkerding's great dedication to Linux (I've just installed his Slackware 10.0 on Pentium I 166 MHz Intel 440VX board based PC where other most recent Linux distribution wont even boot) I'd rather install Zenwalk 3 on my machines than original Slackware 10.2. Or another Slackware based VectorLinux.
If I have to choose between purity, strictness and austerity of parental distributions ( Debian, RedHat, Slackware) and usability and utilitarianism found in child distributions ( Ubuntu, Xabdros, Fedora, PSLinuxOS, Zenwalk, Slax ) I would always go for latter ones.
It's not that I like those eclectic bastards just because they're breaking rules. I simply have a feeling that they all have more things to offer to modern computer users than their rigid parents .
It's sort of like illegitimate child is more up to the challenge than its "big daddy" which is something I always liked in Linux.
And that's where I see the core of what makes the progress going on not only in Linux and Open Source movement: infinite fighting with new calls.
If only parents could learn from their kids!
nedvis

Edited 2006-10-16 03:05

Reply Score: 2

cerbie Member since:
2006-01-02

But, it's that rigidity and lacking stuff you may find useful that makes the parents worth building from.

In many cases, the children are not better--you just read more about the better ones, and are clearly interested in a desktop. If I were to set up a small FW, I'd look into customized Linux distros (Smoothwall, IPCop), Slackware, and OpenBSD. Forget the pretty derivatives. All the added features can mean more time trying to get something that should have been simple to work. I've also had this experience with Ubuntu a few times with desktop stuff.

Sure, the parent distros could learn...but they don't, and shouldn't. If Slackware were to take up much of what makes Zenwalk good (I've not tried 3.0, but 2.4, 2.6, and 2.8 were nice), then Slackware wouldn't be as good at what you might use it for as-is; and it wouldn't be as good as a distro to build from, since one of the cool things going for it in both aspects is simplicity and flexibility through minimalism.

Reply Score: 4

korpenkraxar Member since:
2005-09-10

It's not that I like those eclectic bastards just because they're breaking rules. I simply have a feeling that they all have more things to offer to modern computer users than their rigid parents.

Hmm, and here I was thinking the opposite. That Debian is the more flexible universal distro, whereas Ubuntu is the more streamlined, defined and rigid desktop distro...

To me it seems more like the parent distro is often the general distro, and the daughter is derived and specialized - so if you need an os for a specific task, chances are that you will find the latter by default more tuned to your needs.

Debian->Knoppix->ClusterKnoppix->Quantian

Reply Score: 5

B. Janssen Member since:
2006-10-11

Posted by korpenkraxar: Hmm, and here I was thinking the opposite. That Debian is the more flexible universal distro, whereas Ubuntu is the more streamlined, defined and rigid desktop distro...

Funny, my thoughts exactly. Take a thumbs-up... ;-)

Reply Score: 1

Oliver Member since:
2006-07-15

There is no "better than", I don't see anything better for example in DesktopBSD or PC BSD against FreeBSD. The latter is the best, but DesktopBSD/PCBSD offer some flavour to choose from. Easy/hard to maintain, better than ..., all of these buzz-phrases are maybe right in "your" context but not in common.

> If only parents could learn from their kids!

Sometimes it is useful, sometimes it is crap.

Reply Score: 3

A wonderful Live CD
by Temcat on Mon 16th Oct 2006 13:21 UTC
Temcat
Member since:
2005-10-18

Writing this from under ZenLive. It's very fast - in fact, I can't notice I'm working with a Live CD, apart from application startup times. Even Firefox flies on it! Boot process is fast, too. All partitions on your disks are mounted automatically. XFCE 4.3.99 is clean, powerful and beautiful, if a little awkward as far as panel configuration goes (panel has always been my pet peeve in variuos incarnations of XFCE). Basic development tools are included, which allowed me to compile eciadsl driver and connect to Internet.

Now to the weaknesses.

1) Major: This Live CD is not very suitable for work when your native keyboard layout is not Latin-based, since there is no GUI-based way to add more layouts. For example, I'm Russian, so I'd like to be able to type Cyrillic letters. By launching ZenLive's Keyboardconfig tool, I can select Russian layout, but then I'm losing the English one - and therefore can't even enter the password to restore English input! (I worked around this by copy-pasting text from Firefox.)

2) Minor: IMHO the native GUI tools for package management leave much to be desired. Slapt-get/gslapt combo would be friendlier.

3) Extremely minor: For using as a recovery CD, inclusion of Midnight Commander would be desirable.

Reply Score: 4

A wonderful Live CD [update]
by Temcat on Mon 16th Oct 2006 14:09 UTC
Temcat
Member since:
2005-10-18

One more major weakness: while ZenLive does mount NTFS volumes, it forgets to specify "nls=utf8" in mount options, therefore files and directories with localized names are not displayed, which is not good at all :-( Also, it would be nice to have a non-default option to enable writing on NTFS volumes using ntfs-3g - preferably using a friendly GUI.

One more nicety: the included version of GParted seems to have more capabilities than Ubuntu's one, including creating and resizing NTFS partitions.

Reply Score: 2

Reviewer can't be taken seriously
by Lambda on Mon 16th Oct 2006 14:57 UTC
Lambda
Member since:
2006-07-28

Unfortunately, Zenwalk is not a free-by-default GNU/Linux system. Luckily, this is easy to fix, as I am informed that the Java Runtime Environment, or JRE is the only non-free component of the system. As root, perform the following command in a terminal window:

removepkg jre

Done. Zenwalk is liberated.


Do people really think they're respected because they say such things? Or is this one of these alter-online-egos, where it's all touchy-feely and "hey guys look, I'm part of the movement", but hopefully in real life doesn't actually believe this drivel? Do people really not respect real freedom so much that they diminish it by saying things like "remove jre Done. Zenwalk is liberated"?

Reply Score: 3

RE: Reviewer can't be taken seriously
by DKR on Mon 16th Oct 2006 17:37 UTC in reply to "Reviewer can't be taken seriously"
DKR Member since:
2005-08-22

I'm not looking for respect. I believe in the philosophy. Don't burn bridges just because you have matches.

Reply Score: 1

jwwf Member since:
2006-01-19

I'm not looking for respect. I believe in the philosophy. Don't burn bridges just because you have matches.

I simply wonder if this interpretation of "the philosophy" has any useful end. If one placed a user who had no knowlege of Java licensing in front of a Zen box with or without Java, would he be able to tell the difference between the "liberated" and "non-liberated" versions except when Java programs failed to execute? Would "cp" or "dd" feel different on the "liberated" box?

Reply Score: 1

Liking Zenwalk a lot
by JeffS on Mon 16th Oct 2006 16:53 UTC
JeffS
Member since:
2005-07-12

Having tried many different distros over the last fews, and having gotten fed up with so many of them being bloated and buggy, I've been wanting to try something more stable and efficient.

I've tried Slackware, and liked it a lot - clean, simple (in design), super stable, and efficient. However, even though the command line tools are easy and the config files are well commented/documented, a Slack system takes too much work to get up and running the the way I want.

Enter Slackware derivatives. If so many Debian derivatives can improve on Debian on features, installation, usability, etc, I figured "why not a Slack based distro".

I've used Slax off and on for a year. IMHO, Slax is the best live CD next to Knoppix. However, it's purely a live CD, and the usefullness of Live CDs only goes so far.

So finally I gave Zenwalk a try.

Great move.

Zenwalk is super fast (blazingly fast - faster than anything I've tried), much easier to install and configure than Slack (with fantastic HD detection), and a wonderful Xfce desktop (*nix DE's is another big bugaboo for me - Gnome and KDE have gotten too bloated and buggy for me).

Adding packages is easy, too, with Netpkg, Gslapt, pkgtool, and going to Zenwalk repos, or Slack repos (it is based on Slack 10.2 afterall).

So Zenwalk is like a breath of fresh air - simple, clean, stable, polished, easy, and blazingly fast.

For now, I'm done with the likes of Ubuntu, Mandriva, Fedora, Mepis, etc - too much bloat, too many bugs, too many borked systems as a result of apt or yum or urpmi.

The Slack/Zen philosphy suits me very well.

Reply Score: 1