Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 15th Nov 2007 19:33 UTC, submitted by AVL_
PC-BSD "iXsystems announced today a distribution agreement with Fry's Electronics whereby all Fry's stores nationwide will carry PC-BSD Version 1.4, Da Vinci Edition. The agreement marks the first time that the PC-BSD operating system is made available for purchase at Fry's Electronics. PC-BSD is a fully functional desktop operating system based on FreeBSD 6.2-STABLE. FreeBSD is one of the most used UNIX-like operating systems in the world. It is widely renowned as the most stable and secure server operating system."
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Secure?
by TLZ_ on Thu 15th Nov 2007 20:08 UTC
TLZ_
Member since:
2007-02-05

I thought FreeBSD was known for being the best performance... and OpenBSD was the one with best security?

Reply Score: 4

RE: Secure?
by w00dst0ck on Thu 15th Nov 2007 20:21 UTC in reply to "Secure?"
w00dst0ck Member since:
2006-02-01

It's still known as being very secure with excellent performance.

Reply Score: 7

RE: Secure?
by Oliver on Thu 15th Nov 2007 20:36 UTC in reply to "Secure?"
Oliver Member since:
2006-07-15

OpenBSD is a fine operating system, but with the best paranoia :-) This is of course nothing bad, but security is not an automatism. So it's up to you in the end, an operating system can deliver a proper base only.

Edited 2007-11-15 20:50

Reply Score: 2

Best performance?
by s_groening on Fri 16th Nov 2007 11:10 UTC in reply to "Secure?"
s_groening Member since:
2005-12-13

Actually, word has it NetBSD outperforms both ...

Reply Score: 0

RE: Best performance?
by sbergman27 on Fri 16th Nov 2007 14:28 UTC in reply to "Best performance?"
sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

"""

Actually, word has it NetBSD outperforms both ...

"""

News flash! Benchmarks conducted by NetBSD advocate prove that NetBSD is 10% faster than FreeBSD! While similar benchmarks conducted by a FreeBSD advocate prove that FreeBSD is 80% faster than NetBSD!

Film at 11.

http://tinyurl.com/2lhp2m

Edited 2007-11-16 14:34

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Best performance?
by Oliver on Sat 17th Nov 2007 20:12 UTC in reply to "RE: Best performance?"
Oliver Member since:
2006-07-15

News flash for wanna-be flame-starters :-)

1.advocates yes, but long-time mature developers too
2. no film, if you do your homework first; the NetBSD developer used a developer version of FreeBSD current, with lots of debug stuff in it. Both of them came later to similar results. So no flame-bait, no flame-war and last not least no film. Sorry. If you still want to use your popcorn head over to LKML =)

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Best performance?
by sbergman27 on Sat 17th Nov 2007 22:30 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Best performance?"
sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

News flash for wanna-be flame-starters :-)


Nope. I balanced one possibly controversial point against another so that a flame war would be unlikely. And I linked to the actual exchange between the two testers to provide a fair and accurate view.

And I think I did pretty well since no flame war ever even threatened to break out. I think you misinterpreted my humorous spin on the theme of experimental bias for trolling, which is probably understandable.

And *of course* the interaction between the testers was professional and amicable. The OS wars are like sporting events. The players display a *lot* more sportsmanship than the fans. ;-)

-Steve

Reply Score: 2

Hot
by nullpt on Thu 15th Nov 2007 20:15 UTC
nullpt
Member since:
2006-10-20

BSD is getting itself on new and broader markers ;) Couldn't be hotter.

Keep it up

Reply Score: 3

Boxed distros are so 1990s
by stephanem on Thu 15th Nov 2007 21:20 UTC
stephanem
Member since:
2006-01-11

If music can move to online distribution formats, surely software must do the same (MS and Apple are excluded for piracy reasons).

Reply Score: 0

RE: Boxed distros are so 1990s
by backdoc on Thu 15th Nov 2007 21:45 UTC in reply to "Boxed distros are so 1990s"
backdoc Member since:
2006-01-14

I think this is a valid point.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Boxed distros are so 1990s
by jjmckay on Thu 15th Nov 2007 22:12 UTC in reply to "Boxed distros are so 1990s"
jjmckay Member since:
2005-11-11

There's room for both. Music is still sold in stores, too.

Reply Score: 6

RE: Boxed distros are so 1990s
by Priest on Fri 16th Nov 2007 02:43 UTC in reply to "Boxed distros are so 1990s"
Priest Member since:
2006-05-12

It is available online:
http://www.pcbsd.org/content/view/21/11/

I don't see it as a bad thing that they also offer a boxed version in stores.

Reply Score: 2

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

Online distribution doesn't work so well for the initial OS purchase or rebuilds. Granted, the number of people who can't get access to a network connection is getting smaller but you still need physical media sales until you get that network connection.

Reply Score: 1

Interesting...
by Almafeta on Thu 15th Nov 2007 21:52 UTC
Almafeta
Member since:
2007-02-22

I've used PCBSD for a little bit now, and I'm impressed so far. It does come with some questionable software taking up space on the install CD, but luckily those aren't installed by default.


I can't use PCBSD yet to replace my main computer, but I may put it onto my next laptop. Too bad the nearest Fry's is about 1200 miles away...

Reply Score: 1

whee.. more kde =)
by aseigo on Thu 15th Nov 2007 22:06 UTC
aseigo
Member since:
2005-07-06

i hope this goes far for the PC-BSD team. they've done a really nice job of rolling FreeBSD and KDE into a usable OS. congrats to all involved...

Reply Score: 7

good news
by stormloss on Thu 15th Nov 2007 22:26 UTC
stormloss
Member since:
2005-08-03

Great news for both iXsystems and PCBSD, I hope it spreads.

Reply Score: 3

Fry's
by vondur on Thu 15th Nov 2007 22:33 UTC
vondur
Member since:
2005-07-07

They also sale FreeBSD disks there. They also carry Xandros linux, and other random distros also.

Reply Score: 2

......
by islander on Thu 15th Nov 2007 22:44 UTC
islander
Member since:
2007-04-11

Good move but I want to see some numbers on units sold after.Not trolling,just curious and slightly bewildered since Dell wont release their Ubuntu desktop sales.

Reply Score: 2

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

The best theory I've heard regarding Dell not releasing exact figures for Ubuntu versus other OS sales is that it avoids some of the journalist sensationalism articles and skript kiddie debates that run rampant.

Consider the example of the OLPC project. It is purely about getting education supporting tools too places where digital media is actually far more viable than expensive and limited quantity printed media. The project released a number early on; they wanted to aim for 100$ USD price per unit. There's been no end to ongoing invalid critisism of the project for not meeting that secondary goal. Like any other debate, there is always someone willing to nitt pick at points purely for the chance to complain.

So, back to the point. The theory goes that Dell's financial figures regarding customer choices is just that; Dell's inventory figures. To some degree, they avoid the negative publicity of being bashed all around the net for not meeting targets or whatever other spin can be put on figures for someone's chance to be heard complaining.

I can understand Dell's choice. I'm one of those that would be interested to see solid test results. I'd also like to see true Distro by Distro *nix enumeration figures and true Windows version by version (actually in use) figures but both of those figure sets are not going to apear accurately any time soon either.

Overall, I'm just glad to see choice being offered to the end user outside of the usual geekdom sources.

Reply Score: 4

islander Member since:
2007-04-11

Fair enough.Sounds reasonable to me ;)

Reply Score: 2

Frys... funny
by umccullough on Thu 15th Nov 2007 22:45 UTC
umccullough
Member since:
2006-01-26

I drive withing stone-throwing distance of two different Frys stores on my way to/from work every day ;)

I only shop there because they offer some awesome weekly bargains (most often with mail-in-rebates) - otherwise I find the store pretty much a PITA and somewhat disappointing.

Still - I guess having your product offered for sale at Frys is a milestone ;)

Reply Score: 3

v Bad idea
by airwedge1 on Fri 16th Nov 2007 01:06 UTC
RE: Bad idea
by UltraZelda64 on Fri 16th Nov 2007 03:36 UTC in reply to "Bad idea"
UltraZelda64 Member since:
2006-12-05

"trying to push pc-bsd into the mainstream is not a good idea. It simply is still not user friendly enough, and will end up giving bsd/linux a bad image if they do get people to buy it."

Why not? Has this stopped commercial Linux distros such as Mandrake and SUSE in the past? If there is profit to be made, why not go for it? It can only help the BSDs in the process, and really, they could use a slight boost, with Linux eating away at their pie and Solaris with "Project Indiana" trying to grab some market share. The most that will happen is, I figure, a large number of people with walk in Fry's, see PC-BSD, go "WTF's that?" and move on.

As for Fry's in general... well, I always hear good things about the place. Lots of good deals, and apparently they carry some good stuff. To bad they've got no stores around here in Ohio. From their site when trying to find a nearby store:

"Cannot locate store near this zip code"

Yippee. Well, I guess there's always newegg.com.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Bad idea
by Almafeta on Fri 16th Nov 2007 03:48 UTC in reply to "Bad idea"
Almafeta Member since:
2007-02-22

trying to push pc-bsd into the mainstream is not a good idea. It simply is still not user friendly enough, and will end up giving bsd/linux a bad image if they do get people to buy it.


Well, if Ubuntu in its current state can be a commercial success...

Reply Score: 2

RE: Bad idea
by BluenoseJake on Fri 16th Nov 2007 04:17 UTC in reply to "Bad idea"
BluenoseJake Member since:
2005-08-11

BSD is not linux, and trying to push it into the mainstream and generating interest is how OSS projects get better.

Reply Score: 10

RE: Bad idea
by rajj on Fri 16th Nov 2007 07:34 UTC in reply to "Bad idea"
rajj Member since:
2005-07-06

That never stopped Microsoft from selling Windows.

Reply Score: 9

nonplussed
by Brandybuck on Fri 16th Nov 2007 04:17 UTC
Brandybuck
Member since:
2006-08-27

I don't want to rain on anyone's parade, and I certainly don't want to get Matt mad at me. But how is this news? Last time I was at Fry's they had FreeBSD, NetBSD, AND OpenBSD. I don't recall any OSNews announcement when they started to be carried (though Fry's has probably carried FreeBSD since before OSNews was a gleam in its daddy's eye).

Reply Score: 2

RE: nonplussed
by Doc Pain on Fri 16th Nov 2007 15:22 UTC in reply to "nonplussed"
Doc Pain Member since:
2006-10-08

"I don't want to rain on anyone's parade, and I certainly don't want to get Matt mad at me. But how is this news? Last time I was at Fry's they had FreeBSD, NetBSD, AND OpenBSD. I don't recall any OSNews announcement when they started to be carried (though Fry's has probably carried FreeBSD since before OSNews was a gleam in its daddy's eye)."

PC-BSD and (Free, Open, Net)BSD target different audiences.

Those who want to use FreeBSD (insert NetBSD or OpenBSD, too) usually are able to order it from an online store or simply download it, and then they build their system after their individual requirements. In most cases, they won't be customers at Fry's.

Those who are new to a BSD OS will want to have everything they expect from an OS distribution as they know it from mainstream Linux distributions. So PC-BSD comes with KDE and lots of stuff that is targetted at the average home user. Look into the PBI store and see what's available there. This is the target group that will visit Fry's to see what's on the shelves.

As a sidenote, I think it's a good idea that a home user oriented BSD is available "the old fashioned way" for sale in a shop. Maybe the shiny package will be good for marketing, too. :-)

Reply Score: 3

So?
by simo on Fri 16th Nov 2007 08:41 UTC
simo
Member since:
2006-01-09

"FreeBSD is one of the most used UNIX-like operating systems in the world"

I think that's a little hopeful - 'one of the most' as in the bottom half of the top 10 or so maybe, under Linux, Solaris, AIX, IRIX, Darwin etc.

Charging for PCBSD is a bit much too - I hope its just media costs.

Reply Score: 1

RE: So?
by bentman78 on Fri 16th Nov 2007 12:19 UTC in reply to "So?"
bentman78 Member since:
2005-11-15

"think that's a little hopeful - 'one of the most' as in the bottom half of the top 10 or so maybe, under Linux, Solaris, AIX, IRIX, Darwin etc. "

A quick look on Netcraft would debunk your statement. Linux is more popular, but that's about it. AIX, IRIX, Darwin are way below FreeBSD in usage.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: So?
by simo on Fri 16th Nov 2007 15:50 UTC in reply to "RE: So?"
simo Member since:
2006-01-09

netcraft shows os usage by number of webservers that's all!

solaris is mainly used for backend servers like databases and java appservers, linux is used a lot on embedded stuff, darwin in macosx desktops - none of which are webservers that netcraft would pick up.

freebsd being more popular than macosx is laughable (not that i'm happy about that).

Reply Score: 0

Good luck PC-BSD
by Arabian on Fri 16th Nov 2007 16:48 UTC
Arabian
Member since:
2007-01-23

I'm so happy to see PC-BSD is being more popular since it is based on FreeBSD and KDE. ;)

Reply Score: 2