Linked by Jordan Spencer Cunningham on Fri 27th Feb 2009 00:15 UTC
Windows It's been nearly two months since the beta of Windows 7 was officially released to the general public, and some of us have been getting fidgety to know just what bugs have been reported and what will be fixed. Microsoft was biding its time, letting the information collect and nearly stagnate, when we finally got official word on some of the results of the testing process.
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Comment by flanque
by flanque on Fri 27th Feb 2009 01:57 UTC
flanque
Member since:
2005-12-15

Go, go, Windows.

What do you mean by this?

As a side note, don't you think I'm entitled to 1/250,000th of the profits made on 7 for my two Send Feedback items? Maybe if I play their games and sue Microsoft, I'll get recompense.

Unlikely. Though I haven't read the license you would have had to accept, I'd expect to find a paragraph in there stating you're not entitled to any compensation.


So, what flavour of Linux do you use?

Reply Score: 1

RE: Comment by flanque
by poundsmack on Fri 27th Feb 2009 02:16 UTC in reply to "Comment by flanque"
poundsmack Member since:
2005-07-13

ya the beta testing is "as is" you are testing and resporting back things with no compensation. "Microsoft is not liable for..." it goes on and on, read the whole EULA, but because i got more than just the beta my rules were different as a ___________________

Reply Score: 3

RE: Comment by flanque
by google_ninja on Fri 27th Feb 2009 02:22 UTC in reply to "Comment by flanque"
google_ninja Member since:
2006-02-05

dude, grow a sense of humor

Reply Score: 7

RE: Comment by flanque
by stabbyjones on Fri 27th Feb 2009 03:12 UTC in reply to "Comment by flanque"
stabbyjones Member since:
2008-04-15

Putting bugs and go go together sounds like an inspector gadget reference to me.

Go Go robot, humor!

Reply Score: 3

RE: Comment by flanque
by weildish on Fri 27th Feb 2009 04:09 UTC in reply to "Comment by flanque"
weildish Member since:
2008-12-06

What do you mean by this?

I mean something along the lines of, "yippee skippee: less bugs!" Unless you're avidly anti-Microsoft or a spider, less bugs in Windows is generally a good thing.

Also, I'm using Ubuntu right now, though I wouldn't say it's my system of preference.

Oh, and the part about getting compensated for my testing time wasn't meant to be taken literal. Though I wouldn't mind. I'm sure none of us would. Wishful thinking.

Edited 2009-02-27 04:14 UTC

Reply Score: 3

Testing Windows for free?!?! haha, come on?
by mnem0 on Fri 27th Feb 2009 08:10 UTC
mnem0
Member since:
2006-03-23

Testing windows is like working for free at McDonalds in your spare time. Why would _anyone_ do that? You could be doing something meaningful with your time! Volunteer for a charity, read a book, spend time with your loved ones or whatever.

Because you pay lots of dollars to Microsoft, they should hold up their end of the bargain and release working software. You are _PAYING_ Microsoft to properly test and engineer the software.

For every hour you spend testing Windows you are basically donating $30 to a convicted corporate felon who's _only_ stated goal is to extract as much money from you as it possibly can.

Help out testing Ubuntu and you improve something that you have the _rights_ to use, improve, redistribute and even sell. Help testing Ubuntu and you are helping out millions of people. For every hour you spend testing Ubuntu you are basically donating $30 to millions of people all over the world.

Reply Score: 3

BluenoseJake Member since:
2005-08-11

Testing windows is like working for free at McDonalds in your spare time. Why would _anyone_ do that? You could be doing something meaningful with your time! Volunteer for a charity, read a book, spend time with your loved ones or whatever.


Have you ever beta tested software before? You use the software normally, and report bugs when they occur. You just don't sit there randomly testing features.

Because you pay lots of dollars to Microsoft, they should hold up their end of the bargain and release working software. You are _PAYING_ Microsoft to properly test and engineer the software.


Because I pay lots of money to MS, I want the damn thing to be functional, therefore I want them to test teh hell out of it. MS is a big company, but not big enough that they could effectively find bugs at a rate that would allow Windows to be released. It's very complex.

For every hour you spend testing Windows you are basically donating $30 to a convicted corporate felon who's _only_ stated goal is to extract as much money from you as it possibly can.


Nice number, but meaningless, and entirely made up. The Beta is free. If you like Windows, why not be a tester? It gets you better software in the end, and it costs nothing but a little time. It's my time, don't tell me how I can best use it.

Help out testing Ubuntu and you improve something that you have the _rights_ to use, improve, redistribute and even sell. Help testing Ubuntu and you are helping out millions of people. For every hour you spend testing Ubuntu you are basically donating $30 to millions of people all over the world.


Again with the 30 bucks? It's a bogus number, give it up. Ubuntu isn't out to be a charity, you know. Their stated goal is also to be a successful company, which means making as much money as possible.

Debian or another of the community based distros are the ones that need time and money donated to them, not Ubuntu, they have the same goals as MS. They just want to sell you support.

One of the main reasons to test Windows is because it's sometimes cool to play with new software, to see how things are going, and maybe get a say. Read the Engineering Windows blog, they seem to be really listening to customers this time, and that is what testing is for. So the money you spend on the final product is money better spent.

If you work in a corporate environment and need windows, testing software before release allows you to be prepared for the new product, to know what works and what doesn't, and to perhaps get something fixed so your stuff works.

Reply Score: 10

h3rman Member since:
2006-08-09

MS is a big company, but not big enough that they could effectively find bugs at a rate that would allow Windows to be released.


.. that's kind of a statement, isn't it? :-)

Reply Score: 3

BluenoseJake Member since:
2005-08-11

No company is big enough, not in a reasonable amount of time, Windows is too big.

Reply Score: 3

ssa2204 Member since:
2006-04-22


For every hour you spend testing Windows you are basically donating $30 to a convicted corporate felon who's _only_ stated goal is to extract as much money from you as it possibly can.


You know that referring to any business as a "convicted felon" just makes you lose any credibility.

Anyways, welcome to the world, this is how it works. Business makes product, consumer buys product. I guess in your la la land, software developers all get paid from that mysterious money tree right?

I sure hope you and your family live in the woods living off the land, because god forbid they should be working for any busineses, or are forced to purchase any product. Hey, how are you even writing this? Did you make this computer out of a tree you chopped down? No, you purchased it from a corporation who "only_ stated goal is to extract as much money from you as it possibly can"...now grow up.

Reply Score: 4

erikharmon Member since:
2007-06-20

Corporations are dedicated to making as much money as possible _within_ the bounds of law, which is why Microsoft was in fact found guilty of monopolistic practices, which is in fact a major crime, not to mention anti-capitalistic.

As a consumer and citizen, the free market is a means to creating the greatest social good through economic growth, technological innovation and job creation, I don't care about making as much money as possible. And that is why I am grateful that we have rules against anti-competitive practices which inhibit all those things. It's a good thing that people do care about other things besides money or we'd still be using crappy dialup on rubber couplers over analog handsets owned by Ma Bell.

Reply Score: 2

mfarmilo Member since:
2009-02-28

For every hour you spend testing Windows you are basically donating $30 to a convicted corporate felon who's _only_ stated goal is to extract as much money from you as it possibly can.

Help out testing Ubuntu and you improve something that you have the _rights_ to use, improve, redistribute and even sell. Help testing Ubuntu and you are helping out millions of people. For every hour you spend testing Ubuntu you are basically donating $30 to millions of people all over the world.


I don't understand this. You seem to be saying that beta testers for Windows 7 or Ubuntu are somehow paying $30 an hour for the privilege. Said money goes either into Microsoft's coffers or to 'millions of people' somewhere, depending which product you're testing. Not my words - yours.

Now, brace yourself, I've got some good news for you - it's quite free to beta test either of them! I've been testing Windows 7 since mid January and it hasn't cost me a penny. And last time I checked, Ubuntu was just as free to beta test!

Reply Score: 1

ichi Member since:
2007-03-06

I don't understand this. You seem to be saying that beta testers for Windows 7 or Ubuntu are somehow paying $30 an hour for the privilege. Said money goes either into Microsoft's coffers or to 'millions of people' somewhere, depending which product you're testing. Not my words - yours.


No, he's saying that beta tester is a paid for job that in this case some people are doing for free so a corporation saves some money in the process of developing a commercial product.
It's a matter of maximizing the profit getting people to work for free.

Then he went to compare it with beta testing ubuntu, which is a free (in every sense) product.

Reply Score: 3

DrillSgt Member since:
2005-12-02

No, he's saying that beta tester is a paid for job that in this case some people are doing for free so a corporation saves some money in the process of developing a commercial product.
It's a matter of maximizing the profit getting people to work for free.

Then he went to compare it with beta testing ubuntu, which is a free (in every sense) product.


Where is a beta tester paid? Can you give some examples please? Most beta testing is done for a company by customers. Companies have paid QA people, but those are not beta testers.

Reply Score: 1

ichi Member since:
2007-03-06

Where is a beta tester paid? Can you give some examples please? Most beta testing is done for a company by customers. Companies have paid QA people, but those are not beta testers.


Most know example could be game testing, being the kind of job most teens dream about ;) (they might change their mind though if they asked people working at, say, Eidos).

Beta testing is part of the QA process, and it's only done for free when you can find enough people willing to do so.

Reply Score: 3

Bugs
by charlieb on Fri 27th Feb 2009 08:41 UTC
charlieb
Member since:
2008-12-16

At least they seem to have worked out what bugs are at last.

Reply Score: 1

The title should be:
by sdeber on Fri 27th Feb 2009 09:23 UTC
sdeber
Member since:
2005-07-06

Be shamed if you did not find any.

Reply Score: 4

Where's Microsoft's bug tracker?
by 3rdalbum on Fri 27th Feb 2009 11:10 UTC
3rdalbum
Member since:
2008-05-26

The title says it all: Where is this Microsoft bugtracker, and why aren't their beta testers allowed to access it?

Reply Score: 1

RE: Where's Microsoft's bug tracker?
by mnem0 on Fri 27th Feb 2009 11:31 UTC in reply to "Where's Microsoft's bug tracker?"
mnem0 Member since:
2006-03-23

Microsoft's bug tracker has a lot of super sensitive information. Things like a bug that crashes MSIE due to a buffer overflow in the DHTML parser (usually the bug has a test case or sample file attached as well). Another category is bugs opened as a result of Microsoft partners calling in, clearly they need to keep customer data confidential. At the end of the day, Microsoft has a lot of things they don't want to share with the public, that's why it's called closed source; because you're out of the loop.

Reply Score: 3

No, Thanks !
by shiva on Sat 28th Feb 2009 23:57 UTC
shiva
Member since:
2007-01-24

NT - No, Thanks ! I never will report bugs to improve a overpriced, proprietary, closed, full of DRM, with an abusive EULA operating system made by a company that uses and abuses its monopoly position to kill or damage competitors.

I prefer to help free software with bug reports and ideas.

Microsoft should pay por people to test and/or give partial or discounts for the product acquisition.

Reply Score: 4

RE: No, Thanks !
by ssa2204 on Sun 1st Mar 2009 10:41 UTC in reply to "No, Thanks !"
ssa2204 Member since:
2006-04-22

NT - No, Thanks ! I never will report bugs to improve a overpriced, proprietary, closed, full of DRM, with an abusive EULA operating system made by a company that uses and abuses its monopoly position to kill or damage competitors.

I prefer to help free software with bug reports and ideas.

Microsoft should pay por people to test and/or give partial or discounts for the product acquisition.


So, then what you really want to say is that you are simply a troll with nothing better to do with your sad little life but post nonsense about products and services you do not use...smart.

Reply Score: 1

RE: No, Thanks !
by jrronimo on Mon 2nd Mar 2009 23:17 UTC in reply to "No, Thanks !"
jrronimo Member since:
2006-02-28

http://connect.microsoft.com -- you can file bugs there (as I have a decent handful). The bugs will be examined by someone at MSFT and possibly discussed with their team.

You'll eventually get a response saying:
1. "We've fixed this in the next release" (Closed, Fixed)
2. "This isn't a fix we feel we can include in Windows 7, but will evaluate it for the next version of Windows" (Closed, Won't Fix)
3. "This isn't actually a bug, no matter how you actually want that widget to work -- it's actually working as we've designed it. But if you get enough people to complain, we'll consider re-examining it." (Closed, by design)

It's not an open source project, but there is a way to track your bugs, provide comment and validation on other bugs and rate bugs and get some feedback from a developer. (Many of the complaints you're hearing about Windows 7 are because someone's precious bug got closed as "Won't Fix")

I don't know if the public has access to this, but I've been using Connect for years and I like it.

Reply Score: 1

slaves working for free
by GODhack on Mon 2nd Mar 2009 12:48 UTC
GODhack
Member since:
2008-05-16

.

Reply Score: 1