Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 9th Jun 2010 15:27 UTC
Google There are numerous ways to improve your browser experience if you're somehow still using Internet Explorer. You can download a modern browser with proper standards support, like Firefox or Chrome, but there are numerous scenarios where this isn't possible. One of those is in corporate scenarios, where a lot of people still rely on Internet Explorer. A solution here is Google's Chrome Frame, which just went into beta.
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Comment by darknexus
by darknexus on Wed 9th Jun 2010 16:11 UTC
darknexus
Member since:
2008-07-15

Wouldn't any IT department worth their pay have just as much of an issue with a browser plugin as they would with another browser in general? Given the security risk plugins can pose, as well as the fact that this is just basically another browser within IE anyway, the IT department should subject it to the same criteria.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Comment by darknexus
by pgeorgi on Wed 9th Jun 2010 16:28 UTC in reply to "Comment by darknexus"
pgeorgi Member since:
2010-02-18

I guess it helps by having users use internet explorer (so the ActiveX-based corporate apps still work), and automatically switching over to a different rendering mode for everything else.

No retraining for the UI, no "use Browser A here, Browser B there"...

Basically, it's a migration aid

Reply Score: 2

Lame IT policy is the real problem
by nt_jerkface on Wed 9th Jun 2010 18:03 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by darknexus"
nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

The problem is that IE6 works with Google which for a lot of corps is good enough.

It's an interesting idea but this plug-in won't have any effect on corporate IE6 usage.

IE6 usage is about 5% in NA which means a lot of websites can ignore it. It has dropped over 50% in the past year so just give it some more time.
http://gs.statcounter.com/#browser_version-na-monthly-200905-201006

Reply Score: 2

Administrative rights needed
by azrael29a on Wed 9th Jun 2010 16:16 UTC
azrael29a
Member since:
2008-02-26

You still need administrative rights to install it so it won't work for ordinary users in most corporations.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Administrative rights needed
by gedmurphy on Wed 9th Jun 2010 17:42 UTC in reply to "Administrative rights needed"
gedmurphy Member since:
2005-12-23

I was just thinking that.

I don't get it. If you can install the plugin then you can install Chrome. Where's the use for this plugin?

Reply Score: 2

umccullough Member since:
2006-01-26

I don't get it. If you can install the plugin then you can install Chrome. Where's the use for this plugin?


The advantage that the plugin has is that it allows Google to offer something to people via a method they already understand and are not afraid of (even though they should be!)

Now a website, instead of displaying a message to the effect of: "You need to upgrade your browser", can offer the plugin instead. Idiot users are already happy to download any plugin that is required to see a website (i.e. Flash, Java, Adobe Reader, Nefarious Video Porn Viewer Plugin, etc) - and will do so.

If confronted with the requirement that they install and use a different browser, they less likely to visit this website - and the website developer knows this. Therefore, not offering such an easy solution for website developers will discourage upgrading their website to support HTML5/CSS3 features.

This plugin is a crutch to encourage web developers to improve their websites knowing that they're providing an easier alternative for crappy idiot users to view them.

Reply Score: 4

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Now a website, instead of displaying a message to the effect of: "You need to upgrade your browser", can offer the plugin instead. Idiot users are already happy to download any plugin that is required to see a website (i.e. Flash, Java, Adobe Reader, etc) - and will do so.


Spot on. Exactly. Precisely so.

After a while, Google may well move YouTube entirely over to VP8. They will now have two options to offer to visitors using IE ... either install this Google Chrome Frame plugin, or update their Flash plugin.

The latter is an option because Adobe are a supporter of VP8, and have agreed to make Flash support either VP8 or H.264 encoded videos.

http://www.webmproject.org/about/supporters/
http://blogs.adobe.com/flashplatform/2010/05/adobe_support_for_vp8....

A visitor to YouTube using IE will see a popup asking either to update the Flash plugin, or install the Google Chrome Frame plugin. After either of those, YouTube will work for that IE user in VP8 videos.

This means that at least Google/YouTube can escape from under the control of the MPEG LA consortium, and as a bonus they no longer have to pay MPEG LA royalties.

Eventually, even Adobe might be able to do the same, by removing H.264 support from their Flash player. Alternatively, Adobe might off two variants of their Flash plugin, one with support for H.264 as well as VP8, and the other with support for only VP8. The latter would cost Adobe nothing to distribute, and they might even make this version open source.

Cheaper models of graphics cards might be offered by some vendors with only VP8 (plus maybe Theora) video acceleration in hardware, again thereby avoiding MPEG LA royalties.

PS: as for needing admin rights to install Google Chrome Frame as a plugin for IE, possibly only YouTube users would even want to install Google Chrome Frame to start with. That is OK, since they have already installed Adobe Flash (in order to be YouTube users in the first place), so they should have no trouble installing Google Chrome Frame.

This plugin is a crutch to encourage web developers to improve their websites knowing that they're providing an easier alternative


If YouTube moves over to VP8, and if a significant number of users subsequently start to install Google Chrome Frame, then we could see a snowball effect. More and more websites could use HTML5/Webm/Canvas/SVG/Javascript to achieve advanced features for the website, telling their IE visitors that to view the site they would need Googel Chrome Frame.

If we get such a snowball effect, Mircrosoft and Apple would have finally lost their restraining control over the web.

Apple would have to provide a WebM update for their iDevice users.

Edited 2010-06-10 04:54 UTC

Reply Score: 2

Also for those who are used to IE
by RichterKuato on Wed 9th Jun 2010 17:18 UTC
RichterKuato
Member since:
2010-05-14

I imagine that Chrome Frame is also for all those people who are simply just used to the way IE works and don't want to learn a new browser.

Of course that's not to say they aren't having that problem with IE upgrades. Anyone who was used to IE6 will find IE7 and 8 very alien. "How do print, dammit!"

With this plugin you'll be able to still use IE6 on new sites if you want. Though I don't know how long they'll support it.

Reply Score: 2

Yes it's usefull for corporates
by novad on Thu 10th Jun 2010 05:08 UTC
novad
Member since:
2010-06-10

Hi everybody,

I’m system engineer in a company with about 1500 employees and I see at least one scenario where this plug-in could be really helpful.

We make heavily use of web applications (with a lot of java scripting and Ajax). Performances of these applications under IE7 are really bad, with IE8 it’s just acceptable and it doesn’t work at all with IE6. We had to install Firefox on our computers and deal with 2 installed browsers (GPO sets, etc etc etc). We also have a web app that works ONLY under IE. We have every day calls from user that use the right app on the wrong browser (even after years of usage).

A plug-in like this, as long as it can be installed silently (through scripts or GPO), could have avoided a dual browser install that is complicated for some users… They confuse the browser and the webapp that runs through it (incredible but true :-( ).

Administrator rights for users would not be relevant as the plug-in would be deployed by us (and we are the admins)

Last interesting point is that IE can be configured on every single aspect through enterprise policies, that’s not possible (limited or impossible) with other installed browsers.

I’ll certainly keep an eye on it :-)

P.S: Sorry for my English... Not my language

Reply Score: 2

RE: Yes it's usefull for corporates
by Heard on Thu 10th Jun 2010 09:33 UTC in reply to "Yes it's usefull for corporates"
Heard Member since:
2009-12-24

Just let the web apps look like regular desktop applications with desktop/start menu shortcuts that open them in the right browser. At least that's how we do it in our company.

Reply Score: 1

novad Member since:
2010-06-10

Hi.

In our specific case it wasn't possible.

Most of these webapps are external apps. We don't develop them internally and havn't any control over their look and feel.

Different companies, different problems ;-)

Reply Score: 1

Now imagine this scenario
by OSGuy on Fri 11th Jun 2010 10:13 UTC
OSGuy
Member since:
2006-01-01

Deleted, sorry ;)

Edited 2010-06-11 10:15 UTC

Reply Score: 2