Linked by Hadrien Grasland on Sun 16th Jan 2011 20:11 UTC, submitted by waid0004
General Development "This set of tutorials aims to take you through programming a simple UNIX-clone operating system for the x86 architecture. The tutorial uses C as the language of choice, with liberally mixed in bits of assembler. The aim is to talk you through the design and implementation decisions in making an operating system. The OS we make is monolithic in design (drivers are loaded through kernel-mode modules as opposed to user-mode programs), as this is simpler."
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Unix clone
by hussam on Sun 16th Jan 2011 21:38 UTC
hussam
Member since:
2006-08-17

I too sometimes write my own Unix clone when there's nothing good on TV

Reply Score: 14

Comment by rimzi
by rimzi on Sun 16th Jan 2011 21:54 UTC
rimzi
Member since:
2009-12-17

While I applaud the educational value of these tutorials, IMHO the world does not need yet another UNIX clone ;)

Let's think beyond windows NT and UNIX operating system design, shall we? ;)

Reply Score: 5

RE: Comment by rimzi
by Neolander on Sun 16th Jan 2011 21:57 UTC in reply to "Comment by rimzi"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Indeed, we really don't need yet another monolithic UNIX clone. On the other hand, it's always good to have some doc at hand in the OS development area...

Edited 2011-01-16 21:58 UTC

Reply Score: 3

RE: Comment by rimzi
by kaiwai on Sun 16th Jan 2011 22:58 UTC in reply to "Comment by rimzi"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

True, lets have an OpenVMS clone! I know there have been attempts in the past but there seems to be a reluctance to follow it through to the logical conclusion ;)

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Comment by rimzi
by tylerdurden on Sun 16th Jan 2011 23:47 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by rimzi"
tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17

So we're not thinking beyond NT then, only unix?

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: Comment by rimzi
by kaiwai on Mon 17th Jan 2011 03:20 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by rimzi"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

So we're not thinking beyond NT then, only unix?


Windows NT is no way like OpenVMS - an influence? sure, but it isn't a top to bottom 100% clone of OpenVMS.

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment by rimzi
by tylerdurden on Mon 17th Jan 2011 09:37 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by rimzi"
tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17

Well, linux is not a clone of Unix. so....

My point is that if you want to break from the NT/Unix approach to Operating System design, probably OpenVMS is not the best example. Even though NT and VMS are obviously not clones, they come from the same family tree (literally) when it comes to approaches and concepts.

Truth be told, most OS are fairly related. There are so many ways you can reinvent the wheel.

Edited 2011-01-17 09:44 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: Comment by rimzi
by kaiwai on Tue 18th Jan 2011 09:58 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by rimzi"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

Well, linux is not a clone of Unix. so....

My point is that if you want to break from the NT/Unix approach to Operating System design, probably OpenVMS is not the best example. Even though NT and VMS are obviously not clones, they come from the same family tree (literally) when it comes to approaches and concepts.

Truth be told, most OS are fairly related. There are so many ways you can reinvent the wheel.


Well one could say the same thing about Plan 9 - I'd sooner see a re-implementation of that in LGPL with heaps of driver with a better GUI than the current implementation. I'd argue there are only so many ways you can re-invent the wheel till you stand back and realise they're just variations of each other; taking an idea and tweak it to address some of the short comings etc.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by rimzi
by mariuz on Mon 17th Jan 2011 07:47 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by rimzi"
mariuz Member since:
2006-02-21

you can check freevms , it was somehow usable in previous versions 0.3.x
http://www.freevms.net/

now is rewritten using a microkernel (the older version used monolitic one)
I have tested FreeVMS 0.4 and for the moment boots the kernel

wget http://www.freevms.net/IMG/bz2/freevms-img.bz2
bunzip2 freevms-img.bz2
qemu freevms-img

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by rimzi
by kaiwai on Tue 18th Jan 2011 10:05 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by rimzi"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

There has been no activity in the mailing lists for over 2 months, there is no road map, no schedule etc. All I can assume from that is the project has been abandoned.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Comment by rimzi
by WereCatf on Mon 17th Jan 2011 11:12 UTC in reply to "Comment by rimzi"
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

While I applaud the educational value of these tutorials, IMHO the world does not need yet another UNIX clone ;)

Let's think beyond windows NT and UNIX operating system design, shall we? ;)


I myself have been thinking of a rather different approach to OSes for several years now and I am starting to have a good bagful of ideas, but writing an OS is such a humongous task that there's no point in even trying, especially when there's already so many OSes in use. And none of the ideas could really be implemented in any of the existing ones :/

Reply Score: 2

RE: Comment by rimzi
by bnolsen on Mon 17th Jan 2011 15:29 UTC in reply to "Comment by rimzi"
bnolsen Member since:
2006-01-06

plan9 ?

Reply Score: 4

Comment by thepowersgang
by thepowersgang on Sun 16th Jan 2011 23:35 UTC
thepowersgang
Member since:
2011-01-16

As a member of the Hobby OS development community, I can say that these tutorials stand out as a wonderful resource for people starting out in the field.

Sure the world doesn't need other UNIX clone, but that is not the idea. The purpose of this tutorial is to teach the basics of OS development, using a paradigm that most will already know.

Reply Score: 11

Read my Lisp !
by Kochise on Mon 17th Jan 2011 06:47 UTC
Kochise
Member since:
2006-03-03
RE: Read my Lisp !
by Neolander on Mon 17th Jan 2011 09:00 UTC in reply to "Read my Lisp !"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Some of your points are very relevant, though I think your view of the thing is a bit one-sided ;)

Should I write a series of articles on the subject (been thinking about it for some time), the first one would be called "Getting started... or not" and explain what are good and bad reasons for getting into hobby OS development.

Because yes, there are good reasons. Learning how compilers and computers work at a low level, playing with new OS designs without aiming at becoming famous, or just voluntarily getting into coding something really hard because you want some real challenge in order to improve your skills further... These are all good motivations for hobby OS development. The big problem, as you mentioned, is that one must be realistic about his goals.

Edited 2011-01-17 09:01 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Read my Lisp !
by Kochise on Mon 17th Jan 2011 11:32 UTC in reply to "RE: Read my Lisp !"
Kochise Member since:
2006-03-03

It's not that I dislike writing hobby OS (I do one on my spare time) I just find disgusting some telling people what they aught to do. Sure writing everything from scratch is not productive, per see. Yet you discover things deeply, malfunctions, bugs, culprits, etc... Being a good automotive technician requires that you know a bit of general mechanics, if not specific engine, pump and electrical bits :p

Kochise

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: Read my Lisp !
by Neolander on Mon 17th Jan 2011 16:33 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Read my Lisp !"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Totally agree there.

Reply Score: 1

Comment by abstraction
by abstraction on Mon 17th Jan 2011 07:12 UTC
abstraction
Member since:
2008-11-27

Yes JamesM did a great job writing that tutorial. It has been used as a foundation for countless numbers of hobby operating system.

Also I just want to point out that it can work as a base for any type of operating system. The only UNIXy about it I would say is the use of a simular virtual filesystem.

Reply Score: 2

Comment by philcostin
by philcostin on Mon 17th Jan 2011 18:09 UTC
philcostin
Member since:
2010-11-03

Plan 10?

Reply Score: 1

My Favorite Toy Unix OS's
by fretinator on Mon 17th Jan 2011 20:13 UTC
fretinator
Member since:
2005-07-06

Lil' Debbian:
Kids learn about cooperation. In the first level, Woody, kids must agree on the answers to a thousand questions before proceeding to the next level.

Fedora the Explorer:
Contains a friendly home screen with big buttons such as Music and Videos. When the child clicks the button, they are given a lecture about the dangers of proprietary plugins.

Bu-bu-bu-bu-bu-bu-buntu:
Kids experience a playful coloring book, where they get to enjoy coloring in their favorite Free Software heroes with various shades of brown. Eventually, a kernel update comes and brings the kids a visit from Kernel Coredump the Grump.

Edited 2011-01-17 20:18 UTC

Reply Score: 4

RE: My Favorite Toy Unix OS's
by tylerdurden on Mon 17th Jan 2011 20:31 UTC in reply to "My Favorite Toy Unix OS's"
tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17

What a grown up comment, not childish at all. LOL

Edited 2011-01-17 20:35 UTC

Reply Score: 2

Awesome
by bloodline on Tue 18th Jan 2011 14:34 UTC
bloodline
Member since:
2008-07-28

Bloody brilliant article, I come to OSNews for stuff like this. A really enjoyable read.

Hope to see more like this ;)

Reply Score: 1