Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 11th May 2011 21:53 UTC, submitted by kragil
Graphics, User Interfaces "Pinta, a 'lightweight' open source raster image editor, turned 1.0 on April 27, offering Linux users another choice for simple image editing. Pinta is intended to be a clone of Paint.NET, the Windows-only raster editor written in .NET. As such, it uses Mono under the hood, but it gains the ability to run equally well on Linux, Mac OS X, or Windows. Is it a replacement for GIMP or Krita? That depends on what you need to do." What I like about Pinta is that I actually caused its creation in the first place.
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Comment by orestes
by orestes on Wed 11th May 2011 22:21 UTC
orestes
Member since:
2005-07-06

I'm sure this will get some flak from the "less than enthusiastic about Mono" crowd. Me on the other hand, I'm ecstatic to see this sort of tool on *nix. We've needed a good, simpler alternative to the Gimp for a long time now and if Pinta's anywhere near as good as it's inspiration it'll fit the bill nicely.

Reply Score: 6

RE: Comment by orestes
by lemur2 on Wed 11th May 2011 23:13 UTC in reply to "Comment by orestes"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

I'm sure this will get some flak from the "less than enthusiastic about Mono" crowd. Me on the other hand, I'm ecstatic to see this sort of tool on *nix. We've needed a good, simpler alternative to the Gimp for a long time now and if Pinta's anywhere near as good as it's inspiration it'll fit the bill nicely.


We've had a very good, simple alternative to the GIMP for ages in Krita.

Someone needs to put Pinta on this chart:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_raster_graphics_editors#...

... because as of right now, Pinta doesn't even get to the starting gate compared to Krita.

Reply Score: 4

RE[2]: Comment by orestes
by gtada on Thu 12th May 2011 05:59 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by orestes"
gtada Member since:
2005-10-12

I tried Krita... slower than molasses. I liked the UI and features, but wow was it sluggish.

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: Comment by orestes
by lemur2 on Thu 12th May 2011 07:02 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by orestes"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

I tried Krita... slower than molasses. I liked the UI and features, but wow was it sluggish.


http://krita.org/component/content/frontpage

First beta release Krita 2.3 -- users, here we come!
(Late last year)

Krita now has got amazingly smooth and stable canvas rotation and mirroring. Many new brush engines, like a hatching and a sketching brush. Support for ABR brush files. A complete new transform tool that can do ordinary transforms as well as freeform warping. The very-nearly-best color selector in the world -- check that configuration pane and make it uniquely yours, to fit your style of working. Incredible improvements to the pixel brush. An new multi-threaded display engine. Brush outlines. Swapping to disk in low-memory situations. Presets! You can now save your brush designs -- and for those brush engines that we won't mark as experimental, that's future proof. Gradients that follow your current color selection. Usability improvements like pan with middle-mouse-button and zoom with the scroll wheel. And much more.

And finally performance, performance, performance and stability -- and performance. And hundreds of bug fixes. Of course -- improvements are still possible. But give Krita a whirl and experience the improvement we've reached!


http://www.linux.com/learn/tutorials/425446-modern-art-a-look-at-kr...
(Review dated Tuesday, 29 March 2011)

Time to re-assess, perhaps.

Caveat: "The Krita project decided to focus on developing a painting application (as opposed to a general-purpose raster image editor or a photo-retouching tool, for example)."

So if you want to re-touch photographs, Krita is not the tool, use digikam or GIMP for that. Krita is for painting.

Edited 2011-05-12 07:08 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE[4]: Comment by orestes
by lemur2 on Thu 12th May 2011 07:29 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by orestes"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

"The Krita project decided to focus on developing a painting application (as opposed to a general-purpose raster image editor or a photo-retouching tool, for example)." So if you want to re-touch photographs, Krita is not the tool, use digikam or GIMP for that. Krita is for painting.


BTW, on the topic of raster graphics software, if you do want to catalog and/or re-touch your digital photographs, it is perhaps interesting to note that a significant upgrade to digikam is due for release very soon:

http://www.h-online.com/open/news/item/digiKam-2-0-0-approaches-wit...

http://www.digikam.org/drupal/node/599

Edited 2011-05-12 07:29 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE[4]: Comment by orestes
by gtada on Thu 12th May 2011 08:23 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by orestes"
gtada Member since:
2005-10-12

I'll check it out again... I've been looking for a good painting program on Linux (GIMP definitely is not it).

I wish Autodesk ported Sketchbook Designer to Linux. ;)

Reply Score: 1

RE[5]: Comment by orestes
by lemur2 on Thu 12th May 2011 09:39 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by orestes"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

I'll check it out again... I've been looking for a good painting program on Linux (GIMP definitely is not it).

I wish Autodesk ported Sketchbook Designer to Linux. ;)


Autodesk Sketchbook Designer claims to have this primary feature:
http://usa.autodesk.com/adsk/servlet/pc/index?id=15793589&siteID=12...

"In addition to the sketching capabilities and quality results that professionals have come to expect from Autodesk SketchBook Pro software, SketchBook Designer enables professional designers and artists to use a hybrid paint and vector workflow for concept design illustration and graphic design."

To get the equivalent functionality on a Linux desktop, use a good raster paint program in conjunction with a vector drawing program. It is better if you choose a pair that are designed to work with one another.

I would suggest Krita (for raster graphics) in conjunction with Calligra Karbon (for vector graphics).

http://www.calligra-suite.org/karbon/screenshots/
http://www.calligra-suite.org/karbon/features/

The Calligra suite uses a concept called "flake shapes" that allows each component of the suite to exchange elements with other component programs.

http://slangkamp.wordpress.com/2010/12/12/vector-file-import-for-kr...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flake_%28KDE%29

This concept of flake shapes gives Krita some vector drawing capability:
http://slangkamp.files.wordpress.com/2010/12/kritasvg.png

However, if you don't like Karbon, then there are some other good choices that will work reasonably well in conjunction with Krita, although a little less well integrated.

http://inkscape.org/screenshots/index.php?lang=en
http://inkscape.org/showcase/index.php?lang=en

http://www.libreoffice.org/features/draw/

You don't have to wait for Autodesk ... they probably can't compete on a Linux desktop now anyway.

Edited 2011-05-12 09:50 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE[5]: Comment by orestes
by boudewijn on Thu 12th May 2011 13:38 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by orestes"
boudewijn Member since:
2006-03-05

If you give Krita a try and find something missing or have a question or a comment, don't hesitate to drop by on #krita on irc.freenode.net or on the Krita forums (http://forum.kde.org/viewforum.php?f=136). We'd be glad to hear from you!

Boudewijn, Krita maintainer.

Reply Score: 4

RE[4]: Comment by orestes
by Nth_Man on Thu 12th May 2011 16:31 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by orestes"
Nth_Man Member since:
2010-05-16

Krita is for painting

I wanted to add that with Krita I have cropped images, resized them, modified them with the "duplicate brush", etc. with good results, so if you are already using Krita you can do a lot of photo-retouching works with the same program.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Comment by orestes
by henderson101 on Thu 12th May 2011 09:39 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by orestes"
henderson101 Member since:
2006-05-30

... because as of right now, Pinta doesn't even get to the starting gate compared to Krita.


And? If it aspires to be as comprehensive as Paint.Net is, well - that I applaud.

As per usual, your signal to noise ratio and off topic ranting is tiresome. This app supports three platforms - possibly more if Mono and GTK# are available. So, focusing on a very narrow Linux user base**, is not really helpful, is it? Honestly, Windows - I would use Paint.Net, Linux - I don't ever find a reason to use, Mac OS X - Seahorse or Autodesk Sketchbook on 10.6 (Still use 10.5 because Wacom drivers seem more stable.) Having one common tool across all three would be really nice. And no, GiMP is NOT what I'm looking for. GiMP is okay, but the UI really doesn't translate across Windows and Mac very well. TBH, as all my digital art creation revolves around finishing up using Manga Studio for screen toning, speed lines and speech bubbles, Linux isn't even an option anyway***.

** Yes GiMP is multi platform as noted later above; I've never seen/used a Mac or Windows Port for the others, so can't comment, but they seem Linux oriented to me.

*** If you do know of one - please tell me. I'm all ears. Must handle multiple grouped layers (Sketch, final etc), raster conversion to tone, comprehensive support of screentoning in a separate layer group, dynamic speech bubbles, speed lines... I could go on. Sometimes paying for software is actually the best option. Honestly. "Free/Libre" is not better.

(Oh shock - someone who actually produces digital content commented with a real opinion!! Lemur will explode shortly.)

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by orestes
by lemur2 on Thu 12th May 2011 10:03 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by orestes"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

"... because as of right now, Pinta doesn't even get to the starting gate compared to Krita.


And? If it aspires to be as comprehensive as Paint.Net is, well - that I applaud.

As per usual, your signal to noise ratio and off topic ranting is tiresome. This app supports three platforms - possibly more if Mono and GTK# are available. So, focusing on a very narrow Linux user base**, is not really helpful, is it? Honestly, Windows - I would use Paint.Net, Linux - I don't ever find a reason to use, Mac OS X - Seahorse or Autodesk Sketchbook on 10.6 (Still use 10.5 because Wacom drivers seem more stable.) Having one common tool across all three would be really nice. And no, GiMP is NOT what I'm looking for. GiMP is okay, but the UI really doesn't translate across Windows and Mac very well. TBH, as all my digital art creation revolves around finishing up using Manga Studio for screen toning, speed lines and speech bubbles, Linux isn't even an option anyway***.

** Yes GiMP is multi platform as noted later above; I've never seen/used a Mac or Windows Port for the others, so can't comment, but they seem Linux oriented to me.

*** If you do know of one - please tell me. I'm all ears. Must handle multiple grouped layers (Sketch, final etc), raster conversion to tone, comprehensive support of screentoning in a separate layer group, dynamic speech bubbles, speed lines... I could go on. Sometimes paying for software is actually the best option. Honestly. "Free/Libre" is not better.

(Oh shock - someone who actually produces digital content commented with a real opinion!! Lemur will explode shortly.)
"

Everybody is entitled to an opinion ... my point is that the opinions of a lot of Windows users are quite often remarkably out-of-date.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krita#Version_2.3_release
Version 2.3 release

Krita 2.3 (code named Chagall) was released on 30 December 2010 with 1120 updates. Chagall was notable for being the first KDE4 based release stated as being "ready for end users". It included new brushes such as the sketch and hatching brush, a transform / shear tool, a grid based warp tool and a new color space aware color selector which introduced a range of selector shapes, last used colors swatches, automatic color variant swatches (eg complimentary colors, triads, contrasting colors etc). Chagall included speed increases such as a 400% increase in performance of the standard autobrush tool as well as pervasive multithreading. 299 bugs were also closed over version 2.2. Navigation enhancements included a stylus / middle mouse button only pan and zoom, openGl based, lossless canvas rotation and an on canvas draggable brush size.

Future Development

Krita 2.4 is currently in development, with planned features including: Realistic simulation of paint color mixing, use of MyPaint brushes, a stable version of Krita for the Microsoft Windows operating systems, pervasive hotkeys, OpenCL, GPU hardware acceleration and further speed and stability optimizations.


However, in this particular, it transpires that you aren't out-of-date. A stable version of Krita for Windows is not planned until version 2.4.

http://www.valdyas.org/fading/index.cgi/2007/09/18#kritawin%22~...

http://www.valdyas.org/~boud/images/kritawin.png

Edited 2011-05-12 10:11 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE[4]: Comment by orestes
by henderson101 on Thu 12th May 2011 10:27 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by orestes"
henderson101 Member since:
2006-05-30

However, in this particular, it transpires that you aren't out-of-date. A stable version of Krita for Windows is not planned until version 2.4.


And Mac OS X? Mac is more important to me, as my main machine is a Mac and generally I don't boot Windows on it unless I need something specific (i.e. hardly ever.) I own Manga Studio on both Windows and Mac to enable me to be as flexible as possible though. Look at the specs - you find me a viable alternative and I will give it a trial and then explain where it fails/wins over my current set-up. But it must support Mac *and* Windows to be useful:

http://manga.smithmicro.com/about_debut.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manga_Studio

http://www.comicstudio.net/ (Sorry, Japanese)

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: Comment by orestes
by lemur2 on Thu 12th May 2011 12:32 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by orestes"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

"However, in this particular, it transpires that you aren't out-of-date. A stable version of Krita for Windows is not planned until version 2.4.


And Mac OS X? Mac is more important to me, as my main machine is a Mac and generally I don't boot Windows on it unless I need something specific (i.e. hardly ever.) I own Manga Studio on both Windows and Mac to enable me to be as flexible as possible though. Look at the specs - you find me a viable alternative and I will give it a trial and then explain where it fails/wins over my current set-up. But it must support Mac *and* Windows to be useful:

http://manga.smithmicro.com/about_debut.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manga_Studio

http://www.comicstudio.net/ (Sorry, Japanese)
"

Mac OSX is problematic. I don't think there is a plan to support that any time soon.

But creation of comics? ... this is almost the very definition of what Krita is designed to do.

http://krita.org/frequently-asked-questions
http://forum.kde.org/viewforum.php?f=138
http://krita.org/showcase/2-showcased/detail/52-wasted-mutants?tmpl...
http://animtim.wehost.be/blog/

This talk has been proposed for the Libre Graphics Meeting 2011:
http://create.freedesktop.org/wiki/Comic_book_drawing_with_Krita#Sl...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GdihvnBxliE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XfJTucE6pDw

Better support in Krita for facilitating the workflow of comic strips (e.g. storyboards) is a feature that is still in the early stages of design.

http://old.nabble.com/Comic-Book-Studio-td30358001.html

Note that this is all very, very far in advance of what Pinta is able to do.

Edited 2011-05-12 12:44 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE[6]: Comment by orestes
by lucas_maximus on Thu 12th May 2011 16:33 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by orestes"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

"Coming soon" features is of no use to him.

Reply Score: 2

RE[7]: Comment by orestes
by lemur2 on Thu 12th May 2011 23:02 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by orestes"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

"Coming soon" features is of no use to him.


Neither is Pinta.

Reply Score: 2

RE[6]: Comment by orestes
by henderson101 on Fri 13th May 2011 15:44 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by orestes"
henderson101 Member since:
2006-05-30

Right... yes, if all that was involved with Comic Creation was drawing, Krita would be a useful tool. But that misses pretty much all of the functionality I use in Manga Studio. I draw by hand (usually pencil, sometimes also ink... how very last century of me!), Scan, digitally ink (if I didn't already ink by hand) then Screentone (doesn't do this - if you think it does, you don't understand what that means), add any effects (doesn't do this) and add speech bubbles (doesn't do this either.) So, at best it does less than half of what I need, plus if I drew everything manually, it actually then does zero. This is then completely ignoring the other things it does, such as panelling and page management.

Reply Score: 2

RE[7]: Comment by orestes
by DeadFishMan on Fri 13th May 2011 16:46 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by orestes"
DeadFishMan Member since:
2006-01-09

Right... yes, if all that was involved with Comic Creation was drawing, Krita would be a useful tool. But that misses pretty much all of the functionality I use in Manga Studio. I draw by hand (usually pencil, sometimes also ink... how very last century of me!), Scan, digitally ink (if I didn't already ink by hand) then Screentone (doesn't do this - if you think it does, you don't understand what that means), add any effects (doesn't do this) and add speech bubbles (doesn't do this either.) So, at best it does less than half of what I need, plus if I drew everything manually, it actually then does zero. This is then completely ignoring the other things it does, such as panelling and page management.

Screen toning aside, I don't really see much of an argument as to why Manga Studio is SO superior to either GIMP or Paint.NET. And yes, I also produce digital content occasionally - used to draw on a daily basis a few years ago, not so much today - so I am not talking out of my ass.

Manga Studio is a very nice application, yes, whose interface is primarily directed to those that want to create comics that look like manga, hence the effects, speed lines, speech bubbles, etc. but unsurprisingly it is not as used on professional environments as you are seemingly implying to be.

Most professional comic books are usually drawn on paper and inked manually to be scanned and then colored/tweaked/etc on Photoshop (although many creators are increasingly doing the entire workflow digitally these days). Dialogs are usually put either directly on Photoshop or using a vector app such as Illustrator (which is much better at rearranging speech bubbles than any raster app anyway!). Speed lines and other effects can be created easily on Photoshop. Laying out a page is also easily done on these tools so I fail to see what Manga Studio has that put it a cut above most of those other tools.

Moreover, you sound like someone too dependent on his tools to produce his artwork. Tools will only take you so far. I've seen so much impressive artwork done with GIMP, MyPaint, Krita, Blender and Inkscape that blows a lot of art "professionally done with professional tools" out of the water. DeviantArt is shock full of examples if you don't believe me and some of these artists show their workflow on time lapsed videos on YouTube as well.

I've done some good looking stuff on Blender, GIMP and Inkscape as well and I can attest that while not perfect - what is? - these tools are more than capable of assisting one to produce all kinds of digital artwork.

On the subject of Paint.NET, I think it is a very overrated application. It is a great application and its UI is well done (unsurprisingly as it takes cues from a lot of older photo retouching apps including Photoshop itself) but it left me wanting. I tried to use it exclusively for a little while when on Windows, but it doesn't have a third of GIMP features so I asked myself what's the point? Sure it looks nice, but I need something that works! The way I see it, Paint.NET is somewhere in the middle of KolourPaint and GIMP/Krita feature-wise. Not bad, but it cannot be compared to GIMP on any other grounds other than its UI.

Edited 2011-05-13 16:57 UTC

Reply Score: 2

Comment by Luminair
by Luminair on Thu 12th May 2011 14:13 UTC
Luminair
Member since:
2007-03-30

I for one would like to thank Thom for the best news since Bush got bin Laden.

Reply Score: 3

v OMG! This is news?
by twitterfire on Thu 12th May 2011 14:42 UTC
RE: OMG! This is news?
by lemur2 on Thu 12th May 2011 15:46 UTC in reply to "OMG! This is news?"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Now any clone of a shitty Windows software is news just because it runs on Linux / Os X / whatever? Or it's news because it's the first shitty painting software done with C# and GTK?

What's the fcking news? Did Adobe port Photoshop on Linux, or what? And what's wrong with Paint.net? It runs on Linux too, and is better than this.


Paint.NET does not run on Linux. Windows only.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paint.NET

Having said that, your basic point is valid. Linux already has a number of significantly better raster graphics programs than Pinta. Even Photoshop functionality is largely, if not entirely, covered by a few programs.

So you are right ... this is not an issue.

Edited 2011-05-12 15:50 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: OMG! This is news?
by lucas_maximus on Thu 12th May 2011 16:37 UTC in reply to "RE: OMG! This is news?"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

Paint.NET is so user friendly that they use it in Primary Schools for kids to do artwork on.

I use it a lot when cutting up website designs I don't get in PSD format. It is incredibly fast and easy to use and runs well on even modest hardware.

That is why Paint.NET is so damn good. Having something similar on nix would make my life a lot easier when developing PHP or Rails Websites.

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: OMG! This is news?
by Neolander on Thu 12th May 2011 20:38 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: OMG! This is news?"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Not really an argument. You could make primary school children use Corel Painter pretty easily, too, or any other painting-centric program...

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: OMG! This is news?
by lucas_maximus on Fri 13th May 2011 00:33 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: OMG! This is news?"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

I was just commenting about how straight forward the UI was ...

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: OMG! This is news?
by lemur2 on Thu 12th May 2011 23:01 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: OMG! This is news?"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Paint.NET is so user friendly that they use it in Primary Schools for kids to do artwork on. I use it a lot when cutting up website designs I don't get in PSD format. It is incredibly fast and easy to use and runs well on even modest hardware. That is why Paint.NET is so damn good. Having something similar on nix would make my life a lot easier when developing PHP or Rails Websites.


http://mypaint.intilinux.com/

http://mypaint.intilinux.com/?page_id=9

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: OMG! This is news?
by lucas_maximus on Fri 13th May 2011 00:04 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: OMG! This is news?"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

Thanks I will look at this and Pinta ... probably use Pinta since it is essentially the same app as Paint.NET ... but it is worth trying out alternatives.

Reply Score: 2

RE: OMG! This is news?
by lucas_maximus on Thu 12th May 2011 16:38 UTC in reply to "OMG! This is news?"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

Actually Paint.NET is a pretty good program

Very easy to use and straight forward, low on system resources and it perfect for what it is meant for.

It isn't junk.

Reply Score: 3

Why people are targeting photoshop ?
by dvhh on Thu 12th May 2011 15:23 UTC
dvhh
Member since:
2006-03-20

My primary need for linux would be a replacement for Macromedia/Adobe fireworks (Inkscape partly covers my needa in that regards).

Reply Score: 2