Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 23rd Oct 2011 16:58 UTC
Amiga & AROS Big news from the Amiga world this weekend. That stubborn bunch are holding AmiWest 2011 this weekend, and it's been one heck of an eventful little, uh, event. Not only will the AmigaOne X1000 start shipping by year's end, Hyperion also announced something many in the Amiga world have been waiting for for a long time: an Amiga laptop. Update: Steven Solie, AmigaOS' team lead, also held a presentation about the past, present, and future of AmigaOS. The team is working on some pretty interesting stuff - protected address space, multicore support, USB3, new printing subsystem, and much more.
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Netbook: Count me in
by djrikki on Sun 23rd Oct 2011 17:06 UTC
djrikki
Member since:
2011-09-02

Excellent article, excellent news, we couldn't ask for more this year at AmiWest.

New Amiga Desktop
New Amiga Laptop
New Amiga Website (http://www.amigaos.net)

And yet more news to come this evening.

I am 100% behind the NetBook Amiga, when can I buy one? ;)

If you wanna join the NetBook debate head over to:

http://amigaworld.net/modules/news/article.php?storyid=6117

With Timberwolf and NetBook Amiga this will rock!

http://www.amigabounty.net/attachments/project/44/t3.png

Edited 2011-10-23 17:12 UTC

Reply Score: 4

RE: Netbook: Count me in
by dragossh on Sun 23rd Oct 2011 19:15 UTC in reply to "Netbook: Count me in"
dragossh Member since:
2008-12-16

The website looks awesome. Got even me, who had absolutely no intention of touching any expensive Amiga hardware, excited.

Reply Score: 3

Kudos to the remaining Amiga faithfull
by dsmogor on Sun 23rd Oct 2011 17:49 UTC
dsmogor
Member since:
2005-09-01

The tenacity of the remaining Amiga community doesn't cease to amaze me, especially they have apparently finally managed to deliver something noticeable.

Reply Score: 3

aliquis Member since:
2005-07-23

Or you could had got it like ~10 years ago with MorphOS, when it was slightly more relevant.

Reply Score: 3

Comment by ppc.addon
by ppc.addon on Sun 23rd Oct 2011 17:54 UTC
ppc.addon
Member since:
2010-04-02

indeed i'd really like to have a multiOS capability like AmigaOS+Linux (maybe CRUX PPC).

Reply Score: 1

Hefty price?
by Brunis on Sun 23rd Oct 2011 18:00 UTC
Brunis
Member since:
2005-11-01

Yet it comes with old cheap hardware? .. maybe i missed the expensive parts on that list..

Reply Score: 2

RE: Hefty price?
by some1 on Sun 23rd Oct 2011 19:16 UTC in reply to "Hefty price?"
some1 Member since:
2010-10-05

yeah, the hardware part seems to cost well under $500

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Hefty price?
by Thom_Holwerda on Sun 23rd Oct 2011 19:59 UTC in reply to "RE: Hefty price?"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

You guys have no idea about hadware design, do you?

No other machine like this exists. The entire motherboard is custom-built and custom-designed; you shouldn't just look at the component cost, but also the cost of design and development. This motherboard was built *from scratch*.

Remarkable how something so elemental requires explaining these days. iPhone generation humbug.

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: Hefty price?
by some1 on Sun 23rd Oct 2011 21:14 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Hefty price?"
some1 Member since:
2010-10-05

with all due respect, Thom, I don't think you can possibly lecture me on hardware design.

> No other machine like this exists.
by that reasoning every new device should cost 2 grand?

> This motherboard was built *from scratch*.
I don't think you have any idea what you're talking about. The motherboard seems to use stock components and standard manufacturing process. Here's the picture:
http://www.solie.ca/files/dscn0014.jpg
Can you point which components here are "custom" or otherwise justify the price?

> but also the cost of design and development
that's what I've said -- hardware cost is a small part here, most of the price is to compensate for development effort. now whether you think it's fair is a separate thing. I think they could use better parts if they were targeting high-end market.

Reply Score: 1

RE[4]: Hefty price?
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Mon 24th Oct 2011 00:24 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Hefty price?"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

Where else can I buy a motherboard that supports a dual core PA-Semi Power PC chip and a XMOS ?

Please, let me know, that I may go and purchase it.

Reply Score: 3

RE[5]: Hefty price?
by some1 on Mon 24th Oct 2011 03:06 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Hefty price?"
some1 Member since:
2010-10-05

what are you going to do with it? you can't buy PASemi CPU unless you're a pre-existing customer. and if you were you could design the board yourself.

Reply Score: 2

RE[6]: Hefty price?
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Mon 24th Oct 2011 04:36 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Hefty price?"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

Well, that is another question entirely. I'm not sure what I would do with a Unicorn either. Or A billion pounds of Iron. Or my coffee tomorrow morning. But I really would like all of the above.

Now its my turn to ask a completely question that deflects from the current conversation in a way to cover up a previous line of discussion that veers around one I'd rather not continue.

Do you have any experience programming FGPA's? Is there a good dev kit you'd recommend?

Reply Score: 2

RE[7]: Hefty price?
by kingmouf on Tue 25th Oct 2011 11:30 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Hefty price?"
kingmouf Member since:
2011-10-25

Xilinx Virtex-6 ML605. ;)

Reply Score: 1

RE[4]: Hefty price?
by chandler on Mon 24th Oct 2011 00:54 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Hefty price?"
chandler Member since:
2006-08-29

Your ignorance of basic economics is showing. There are two cost components to mass-produced products: a fixed cost for design, validation, tooling, etc. and a per-unit cost based on the cost of the components and the time needed to assemble them. (Yes, engineers need to eat too.) The more units you sell, the more you can amortize that fixed cost.

The per-unit cost of the components also decreases as volume increases due to transactional costs, assurance of demand to the supplier, etc. It's wouldn't be at all surprising if the cost of the non-CPU components for a short run (under 10000 quantity) of these motherboards is 5x what it would cost a major manufacturer in high volume.

As far as the custom components in that picture, I see a very large red one... not to mention the PA Semi CPU which was not produced in high quantities.

Edited 2011-10-24 00:57 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: Hefty price?
by some1 on Mon 24th Oct 2011 03:40 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Hefty price?"
some1 Member since:
2010-10-05

It's more like your inability to read more than 5 words into the comment. I'm commenting on the parts cost, which is what you called "per-unit cost". Given that the parts are not very new nor earth-shuttering this can be used as a rough estimate of "what you're getting" (design and development costs are much harder to compare across different companies and products).

As for per-unit cost decreasing with volume, this is certainly true, but much less so with circuitry than with silicon (that is, smaller batch size will give you competitive prices), which is why most devices are built with custom boards from mass produced chips. So just having "big red thing" is not enough to make it expensive to produce, if you're thinking at least 1000s units. And both PA6T and XCore are cheap. To quote http://a-eon.com/news.html: "The PA6T-1682M is a high performance, low cost, cool running dual-core". XCore is generally available (e.g. http://search.digikey.com/us/en/products/XS1-L01A-TQ128-C5/880-1019...).

So, as I've already said, the price is to cover years of development with a small projected number of sold units. Which doesn't seem like a good value to me, but whatever makes you guys happy. I presume yourself and Thom have already pre-ordered?

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Hefty price?
by kovacm on Mon 24th Oct 2011 11:34 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Hefty price?"
kovacm Member since:
2010-12-16

You guys have no idea about hadware design, do you?

No other machine like this exists. The entire motherboard is custom-built and custom-designed; you shouldn't just look at the component cost, but also the cost of design and development. This motherboard was built *from scratch*.

Remarkable how something so elemental requires explaining these days. iPhone generation humbug.


http://acp.atari.org/

http://acp.atari.org/images/FireBee1nr5.jpg

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: Hefty price?
by tylerdurden on Mon 24th Oct 2011 23:40 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Hefty price?"
tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17

Thom, out of curiosity as a communications/journalism major; What experience with Hardware design do you have, exactly?

Reply Score: 3

RE[4]: Hefty price?
by Thom_Holwerda on Mon 24th Oct 2011 23:47 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Hefty price?"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

Enough to know that, for instance, the Xmos chip is connected to the cpu directly - not through a bus - and that this had to be designed specifically for this motherboard, and that this obviously is going to have a direct effect on the cost.

You?

Reply Score: 1

RE[5]: Hefty price?
by tylerdurden on Tue 25th Oct 2011 00:15 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Hefty price?"
tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17

Actually the XMOS chip is partially connected to the CPU's local bus, so technically it uses a "bus." In any case, when it comes to board layout level, "bus" does not mean what you think it means. Point-to-point switching fabrics, still have to use physical buses of signals/traces at the physical level (even if they only involve 2 devices).

Thus my point that large amounts of people writing about technology, nowadays, tend to have little technical knowledge themselves. Or a very superficial understanding of the subject matter at best. So I find it hilarious when you lecture others on the realities of an industry with which you have no direct involvement.


Cheers.

PS. Actually I'm a computer architect, working for a rather large fabless outfit. Not that it matters, since arguments to authority are fallacies. Esp. on the internet.

Reply Score: 4

RE: Hefty price?
by vidarh on Mon 24th Oct 2011 08:20 UTC in reply to "Hefty price?"
vidarh Member since:
2011-10-14

The expensive part is where the hardware is manufactured in really small volumes because it's a niche product. Not a terribly big deal, as the current and potential market for AmigaOS compatible hardware isn't particularly price sensitive these days - people who want something cheap have either left or gone for AROS or MorphOS.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Hefty price?
by zima on Fri 28th Oct 2011 10:24 UTC in reply to "RE: Hefty price?"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

MorphOS also had this problem for most of its existence; certainly in times when it was almost making some noise. Meanwhile, AROS wasn't usable (even now it barely is)

This phenomena, targeting niche & expensive routes of hardware, seemingly almost as if on some kind of principle, isn't just "not a terribly big deal, as..." - it's what hammered the nail in the coffin of Amiga, over the last ~1.5 decade.
A major reason for the following enjoyed by Amiga, in some places, is because it was a damn good deal.

Reply Score: 2

Awesome.
by Thom_Holwerda on Sun 23rd Oct 2011 18:02 UTC
Thom_Holwerda
Member since:
2005-06-29

I'm watching Trevor's talk right now about the development of the X1000... This is really good stuff.

http://www.amiwest.net/broadcast/index.html

Reply Score: 4

RE: Awesome.
by kragil on Sun 23rd Oct 2011 18:25 UTC in reply to "Awesome."
kragil Member since:
2006-01-04

Strangely I was forwarded to some strange domainhoster. Had to use a different browser.

Anyways stream is at
http://stream.ziaspace.com:8000/;stream.nsv

Reply Score: 2

RE: Awesome.
by antidroid on Sun 23rd Oct 2011 19:26 UTC in reply to "Awesome."
antidroid Member since:
2010-01-05

I heard something about three more contracts with Verisys during the X1000 presentation today.

Seems this group is going to be around much longer than
has been predicted several times. Good for them.

Reply Score: 1

AmigaOne X1000 @ almost 2500$ WOW
by ronaldst on Sun 23rd Oct 2011 20:12 UTC
ronaldst
Member since:
2005-06-29

I'm very happy for AmigaOS4 fans but the X1000 doesn't looks like a very good value for something that has a CPU that's EoL and priced like it was high end stuff.

If it came with a custom made casing and everything else to run OOTB then it would be nicer deal. It's even more expensive than previously announced.

Reply Score: 3

vidarh Member since:
2011-10-14

What does it matter if the CPU is EOL? It won't magically disappear from your motherboard because it's EOL, and it's not like it'd have been upgradable even if it wasn't EOL.

And you miss the point. What are the alternatives? The people who will be buying this want a machine that runs AmigaOS 4 that is faster than the existing hardware that runs AmigaOS 4. It's not like an x86 box from the PC shop on the corner offers better value, because it's not fit for their purpose (and most of them probably *do* already have an x86 box *too* to serve other purposes).

Reply Score: 1

tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17

The CPU being EOL'd does matter a big deal. Parts availability, for example, it's a crucial issue.

Buying a product which is not only obsolete, but based around terminated parts, even before it hits the shelves seems like a bizarre enterprise.


But that is part of what makes the Amiga... well, the Amiga I guess.

Reply Score: 2

Limebook
by -ujb- on Sun 23rd Oct 2011 20:22 UTC
-ujb-
Member since:
2005-10-21

the AmigaOS netbook will more than probably be a THTF Limebook. It is 5121 based, i.e. e 400MHz e300 chip. Those netbooks were going for 1599 RMB (about 230USD) two years ago.

Some years ago Genesi was evaluating that chip. Initially Genesi and THTF were going to do teh LimpePC project together, but later they went different routes. nevertheless there's quite some "Efika" in the LimePCs. Funny this now returns to OS4.

Reply Score: 2

chipmaker
by fran on Sun 23rd Oct 2011 20:50 UTC
fran
Member since:
2010-08-06

Apple owns the company who supply the PWRficient PA6T-1682M chip..P.A Semi(an end of life basis).

I wonder what other alternatives chips there is on the long run.

PS..Now that we know the real chip supplier is we know why it's so dayum expensive.

Reply Score: 2

RE: chipmaker
by vidarh on Mon 24th Oct 2011 08:26 UTC in reply to "chipmaker"
vidarh Member since:
2011-10-14

There's a bunch of alternative CPU's from Freescale and others. Any CPU upgrade will requires changes to the motherboard in any case, so it doesn't matter much that it's EOL - there's no way the X1000 will sell enough, even if tremendously successful by current Amiga standards, to take more than a tiny little nibble out of the aftermarket supply of these CPU's.

Reply Score: 2

Probably not a Limebook
by tidux on Sun 23rd Oct 2011 22:03 UTC
tidux
Member since:
2011-08-13

There's no mention of a PPC laptop chipset on limepc's own website - the idea that they'd completely hide that while using it as the core of a new Amiga is implausible.

Reply Score: 0

RE: Probably not a Limebook
by Mascarado on Sun 23rd Oct 2011 22:41 UTC in reply to "Probably not a Limebook"
Mascarado Member since:
2011-10-23

You should check in the right places before you state such things as fact, sir.

http://www.limefree.org/

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Probably not a Limebook
by SamuraiCrow on Mon 24th Oct 2011 15:06 UTC in reply to "RE: Probably not a Limebook"
SamuraiCrow Member since:
2005-11-19

http://www.limepc.com/z9.shtml states that it runs PPC Android. This is a big-name OS. AmigaOS is more of a hobby OS at this point so of course they're not going to advertise it.

Reply Score: 2

What makes it unique? Just the name?
by Zbigniew on Mon 24th Oct 2011 11:37 UTC
Zbigniew
Member since:
2008-08-28

In the 80's Amiga was exceptional, especially because of its graphics/sound capabilities, when comparing to PC-clones. But this one has - for example - just "ATI Radeon R700 graphics card", therefore nothing that exciting.

Is there anything - but the "legend" - that can encourage the customer to spend that money?

Reply Score: 2

antidroid Member since:
2010-01-05

Lurking around their websites, looks to me like they are a group of computer enthusiasts that like more then just being users/gamers.

They seem to dig right into their common equipment and have fun doing so.

Having the very latest and greatest, new today-obsolete tomorrow hardware doesn't seem to fit in with what they do. Computing.

The users/gamers in their community also seem to be more computer savvy then their contemporaries on other systems.

Many still have, and use, Amigas they bought 20+ years ago, and,, there are a few companies still making new equipment/upgrades for those older computers.

It's fun to them, and that's just cool.

Reply Score: 1

Zbigniew Member since:
2008-08-28

There's a whole lot of much cheaper equipment, which you can "dig right into". The question is: why should one "dig" into something that expensive, which doesn't seem to offer (am I wrong?) anything that much different, than the other equipment - available at far lower price - worthy of "digging"?

I was pondering, why one would have for his/her "computing" exactly this pricey hardware.

Reply Score: 2

antidroid Member since:
2010-01-05

Well, you're not crazy, they are.

I'm sure if you go to their house and tell them they are crazy they will simply shrug and reply with something like

'OK. So whats you're point?'

Seems like they're doing what they want to do, on the platform they want to do it on.

You might as well argue politics with a Duck. When you finish the Duck will just go back to doing Duck stuff anyway, even if it agrees with you.

Reply Score: 2

axilmar Member since:
2006-03-20

Nothing, from what I can tell.

What I wish for Amiga is hardware and software that's based on parallelism for performance. For example, a board with 256 CPU cores and very low latency memory, and an O/S and core APIs to make parallelism / concurrency a breeze.

Imagine the Juggler demo done in real time at 60 FPS! many jaws will drop!

Reply Score: 1

viton Member since:
2005-08-09

and an O/S and core APIs to make parallelism / concurrency a breeze.
Amiga today is about "old" stuff. Being modern means "throw old stuff out" and start from scratch with the realities of 2020 tech, at least, to stay close to competition.

Reply Score: 3

axilmar Member since:
2006-03-20

Or, start from scratch, and emulate the old stuff using existing software.

Reply Score: 2

The last nail in the coffin
by mlankton on Mon 24th Oct 2011 12:22 UTC
mlankton
Member since:
2009-06-11

At this price only the most diehard of the remaining Amiga faithful will go for this. Even so, I've always got the impression that the remaining Amiga community consisted of a few brokedick Europeans, so that makes the ticket on this one even more baffling.

I've wanted a modern Amiga system for years, and could kind of kick myself for not getting a Pegasos when they were around. But this...no, no thanks. Not for the cost of a new entry level Mac Pro. Not for hardware that has 2004 specs. No thanks. RIP Amiga, I barely knew you. Long live NEXTSTEP!

Reply Score: 0

RE: The last nail in the coffin
by SamuraiCrow on Mon 24th Oct 2011 15:04 UTC in reply to "The last nail in the coffin"
SamuraiCrow Member since:
2005-11-19

You missed half of the news! The psuedo high-end X1000 is too high but the netbook they are looking at coming out with is predicted right in the $300-500 range.

Reply Score: 3

Comment by ilovebeer
by ilovebeer on Mon 24th Oct 2011 15:44 UTC
ilovebeer
Member since:
2011-08-08

Slapping together a bunch of outdated hardware and installing AmigaOS on top of it all is certainly not what Amiga enthusiasts are after. This monstrosity is a gimmick and undeserving of the name.

I almost want to go pull out my remaining A500 and A1200 from storage, just to acknowledge the dead and pay them my respects.

Too little, too late, too expensive, and totally missed the target regardless. No thanks.

Reply Score: 0

Duke Nukem foerever?
by spiderman on Mon 24th Oct 2011 16:10 UTC
spiderman
Member since:
2008-10-23

Will it run Duke Nukem forever? If it does, then I may consider buying one.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Duke Nukem foerever?
by BallmerKnowsBest on Tue 25th Oct 2011 01:10 UTC in reply to "Duke Nukem foerever?"
BallmerKnowsBest Member since:
2008-06-02

Will it run Duke Nukem forever? If it does, then I may consider buying one.


Of course! It also comes with a free copy of Starcraft: Ghost & the hardware is guaranteed-compatible with the 1.0 release of GNU/Hurd.

Reply Score: 2

Uses nowadays
by Gestahlt on Mon 24th Oct 2011 17:41 UTC
Gestahlt
Member since:
2011-10-17

Amiga 500 was the second computer i possesed. Aside from games there were a lot of productivity involved (AmigaTracker and so on).

What real uses do these Systems have nowadays aside from being labeled "Amiga"?

Is there are market aside from those enthusiasts?

Reply Score: 1

I Will buy it! Easy choice for me!
by Plexus on Mon 24th Oct 2011 18:09 UTC
Plexus
Member since:
2010-01-03

Im already running AmigaOS 4.1 update 3 on my Sam440 Flex 733 mhz.
And yes I want faster hardwares for games and Heavy emulators and such of things..........

I buy X1000 direct..
Not much money for a
Super Amiga that run the best Amiga operating system whats ever developed......
I never tuch a PC with win or mac since I got my Sam440 for example

Reply Score: 1

dragossh Member since:
2008-12-16

I'm wondering what work you're doing on your computer.

Edited 2011-10-25 12:42 UTC

Reply Score: 2

That presentation was hard to watch.
by Odwalla on Mon 24th Oct 2011 19:32 UTC
Odwalla
Member since:
2006-02-01

Between the speaker laughing at his own (sad) jokes every 30 seconds, him reading off of printed out notes, the auto-white-balancing camera that kept him in shadow for the entire presentation, and the video screen that showed nothing but a list of names it was really hard to pull the message out of the noise.

The Amiga was/is a multimedia powerhouse and a guy in charge of developing the OS can't use a slide presentation running on the computer? What was the point of having the projector on if it wasn't going to be used for anything. It was all very distracting.

Reply Score: 2

Gents
by Mikey_C on Mon 24th Oct 2011 19:55 UTC
Mikey_C
Member since:
2011-10-24

I am very heartened by the many positive comments on here for a change. Its nice to see some people actually having an open mind. The Amiga Netbook sounds like it may entice a few people to try out an Amiga for either the first time or for the first time in a long while. Thank you, the Amiga OS developers and the community at large appreciate it.

As to those who have nothing better to say about the Amiga community and the computer itself, please bear this in mind.....
The Amiga community has been around for a long time, it may be small, but just like the computer it has absolutely no intention of slipping away quietly.
So rant all you like about your percieved short comings of the Amiga platform, because in truth it really doesn't matter one bit. The Amiga will continue whether you like it or not and honestly, it doesn't matter what you think or say.

Mikey C

Reply Score: 1

Comment by JohnB
by JohnB on Mon 24th Oct 2011 21:24 UTC
JohnB
Member since:
2005-10-16

Great news for the Amiga platform. X1000 soon to be released and a future cheap/mobile entry point to running Amiga OS 4.

I actually enjoyed the presentation from Steven Solie. He seems like a nice guy and very committed to his role. More frequent updates and transparency on what is being developed can only be a good thing.

As for cost the Amiga is a niche platform and the X1000 is a custom specification, low volume system. It was obvious the machine would be expensive to produce. There's no point comparing to Mac/Windows/Linux only hardware as they're not able to run Amiga OS 4 which is surely the whole point if you're even considering an X1000 - unless you're a PPC Linux geek ;)

If you want to run Amiga OS 4 you either need a heavily upgraded classic set-up, buy an X500, place a pre-order for the X1000, buy a second hand compatible system (Pegasus II, AmigaOne etc) OR wait for the cheap mobile option of the netbook. There's plenty of options there for all price points which is a great position to be in. So if you want Amiga OS 4 take your pick ;)

Reply Score: 1

BushLin
Member since:
2011-01-26

...the Natami project might be just up your street (when/if it happens).

http://www.natami.net/hardware.htm

They're using an FPGA to recreate the original Amiga hardware (Motorola 680x0, OS 3.x, AGA etc.) and improve upon it to give better clock speeds, features and allow you to plug in modern peripherals directly without needing things like a scan doubler.

I've been watching this project for a while and think this should turn out to what I'd consider to be a modern Amiga experience.

If it's successful enough, who knows, maybe they can take it to the next level, implement in silicon and give it some really impressive performance.

Reply Score: 1

SamuraiCrow Member since:
2005-11-19

I agree about the NatAmi. If I hadn't already posted I'd have modded your post up.

The only clincher is that in order to get the most out of the NatAmi is that there are going to have to be custom drivers written for the OS. Since all of the true-color graphics APIs have been bought out by Hyperion-Entertainment (the makers of AmigaOS 4) and the MorphOS team, it looks like the NatAmi may have to run AROS 68k to get the most of the hardware.

Reply Score: 2

djrikki Member since:
2011-09-02

I know your only trying to advertise the Natami, but seriously... the Natami debate doesn't really belong here. Natami is all about 'the retro' and games, whereas AmigaOS development is all about the future and the future doesn't involve playing game x,y or z under 2megs of RAM.

Reply Score: 1

ferrels Member since:
2006-08-15

Ummm...where did you get that the Natami is only about retro gaming and using less than 2MB RAM? I think you have it confused with the FPGAArcade/Replay Board found here: http://fpgaarcade.com/

Get your facts straight on the Natami here:
http://www.natami.net/

Reply Score: 1

BushLin Member since:
2011-01-26

It's not really a debate, especially if you can't be bothered to click on the link which would have told you the current Natami has 512MB of DDR2 RAM.

Everyone is entitled to buy whatever wacky Amiga hardware they want for their own experience. It's not like anyone is proposing a system which sets itself apart like the original Amigas did back in the day.

Let's not kid ourselves, these are to be toys for nostalgic geeks. No one could seriously get away with just using an Amiga for all their needs (unless you're a masochist).

However, massive improvements can still be made by groups of enthusiasts and now technology like FPGAs make possible what was previously just pipe dreams for such a shrinking niche market.

Edited 2011-10-27 03:36 UTC

Reply Score: 1

Dasher42 Member since:
2007-04-05

I think that proper utilization of FPGAs is exactly what could make an Amiga platform innovative again. Hardware acceleration made it what it was in the 80s and now one of the most interesting innovations is using FPGAs to accelerate more software on the fly. Observe the LLVM project making FPGAs a back-end. Seems to me a CPU+GPU+FPGA with that kind of flexibility could work a lot of wizardry, scaling up to whatever number of cores of whatever type for the jobs you've got.

Reply Score: 2

Exciting news...
by Dr.Mabuse on Tue 25th Oct 2011 01:24 UTC
Dr.Mabuse
Member since:
2009-05-19

I have fond memories of the Classic and AGA Amigas, so I'm curious to see how this new one works out. The Netbook's entry price seems good, but the main system will probably leave a few people scratching their heads unless the system can do something really amazing.

The wikipedia page on the X1000 indicates that the custom "Xena" processor can be programmed through a series of 'C' extensions. Sounds like fun! Nothing like banging the hardware I tell ya ;-)

Reply Score: 1

RE: Exciting news...
by SamuraiCrow on Tue 25th Oct 2011 17:11 UTC in reply to "Exciting news..."
SamuraiCrow Member since:
2005-11-19

The Xena chip is just a dual-core multithreaded XCore embedded controller. It will be able to do most of the things that a hardware-interrupt would do without the pipeline stalling. It may also be used by the audio mixer or something like that for ultimately the same purpose. It is a good idea but not worth what AEon is asking for it.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Exciting news...
by zima on Fri 28th Oct 2011 09:35 UTC in reply to "RE: Exciting news..."
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

It seems like the envisioned usages make it, mostly, a stream (co)processor of sorts?

In such case... this "Amiga" has also another one - and however old R700 already is, it's almost certainly significantly faster, on average, at stream processing tasks.

Reply Score: 2