Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 3rd Jul 2018 23:11 UTC, submitted by judgen
SuSE, openSUSE

SUSE, the open source software company, has been sold to a Swedish private equity firm.

EQT Partners will acquire SUSE from current owners Micro Focus in a deal worth $2.5 billion USD and is expected to close in early 2019.

EQT is described as “a development-focused investor with extensive experience in the software industry”.

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Whoa WTF
by Poseidon on Wed 4th Jul 2018 00:09 UTC
Poseidon
Member since:
2009-10-31

Chalk this up on the "I never thought this would happen" category, but ok. So does this mean that it was not doing good? It's been a while since I have used it.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Whoa WTF
by acobar on Wed 4th Jul 2018 01:31 UTC in reply to "Whoa WTF"
acobar Member since:
2005-11-15

SUSE is doing well, the company that bought them before, Micro Focus, as part of Attachmate buyout, needed the money because they made a bad investment on HPE software division.

Also, the focus of Micro Focus (that's funny!) is more like support for some bygone venerable tech, so, SUSE was a bit unaligned to their core business.

At least, that is what I have read.

Edited 2018-07-04 01:37 UTC

Reply Score: 7

RE[2]: Whoa WTF
by jh27 on Fri 6th Jul 2018 15:07 UTC in reply to "RE: Whoa WTF"
jh27 Member since:
2018-07-06

>> the focus of Micro Focus (that's funny!) is more like support for some bygone venerable tech, so, SUSE was a bit unaligned to their core business

SUSE was acquired when they bought Novell, the fact that they are selling SUSE and not Novell (assuming there is still a separate Novell) would tie in with that. TBH I wasn't aware Micro Focus still existed, I know them for Micro Focus COBOL ;)

Reply Score: 2

RE: Whoa WTF
by Ford Prefect on Wed 4th Jul 2018 13:53 UTC in reply to "Whoa WTF"
Ford Prefect Member since:
2006-01-16

SuSE is doing extremely well, they were bought by Novell for $210 million back in 2004, now sold for $2.535 billion.

They currently employ around 1,400 people and they regularly contribute to the GNU/Linux and open-source community in a similar fashion to Red Hat.

SuSE can be seen as the European counterpart to Red Hat and played a major role in the formation of the exceptionally strong GNU/Linux and KDE communities in Germany.

Many people are making fun about SuSE's individual approaches with YaST etc., which back in the nineties really did encourage and enable many novice users to run their own Linux system. Sure YaST has its shortcomings, but SuSE's distributions as a whole were always quite reasonably put together. During all the time, SuSE was always a well-respected citizen in the community.

Edited 2018-07-04 13:54 UTC

Reply Score: 6

RE: Whoa WTF
by krylon on Wed 4th Jul 2018 17:17 UTC in reply to "Whoa WTF"
krylon Member since:
2018-07-04

I have been running openSUSE Tumbleweed on my desktop for the past ~15 months, and I have been quite happy.

I have no clue how their enterprise offerings are doing, but the community distro is very much alive.

Reply Score: 2

v meh...
by codifies on Wed 4th Jul 2018 07:45 UTC
Comment by kurkosdr
by kurkosdr on Wed 4th Jul 2018 09:09 UTC
kurkosdr
Member since:
2011-04-11

A part of me wants this company to pull a Darwin and create a world-class experience on top of the Linux kernel and userland, propietary or open-source. But it probably won't happen. This needs to much money...

Reply Score: 1

RE: Comment by kurkosdr
by moondevil on Fri 6th Jul 2018 06:24 UTC in reply to "Comment by kurkosdr"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

That time is now gone, it was the early 2000, when we still believed on the Linux desktop idea.

Now in a world where Android and ChromeOS couldn't care one second what kernel they actually use, and we have GNU/Windows alongside N̶e̶X̶T̶S̶T̶E̶P̶ macOS, I don't believe it will ever happen.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Comment by kurkosdr
by zima on Tue 10th Jul 2018 00:15 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by kurkosdr"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

N̶e̶X̶T̶S̶T̶E̶P̶

How did you do this crossed out NeXTSTEP? ;) Seems I can't replicate it in notepad by trying to copy one of the "-"... it gets selected together with its letter.

Reply Score: 2

Thumps up for SuSE
by PedroReina on Wed 4th Jul 2018 16:39 UTC
PedroReina
Member since:
2018-01-14

Long time ago (around 2000), I set up a computer classroom for my high school pupils. Beeing a free software advocate, I went to an international event asking for promotion posters to decorate the classroom. The SuSE representatives were of the most generous donators. They even gave us a complete 6.2 box, including support, although I said the OS of choice were Debian.

Reply Score: 2

Zypper
by IndigoJo on Wed 4th Jul 2018 16:49 UTC
IndigoJo
Member since:
2005-07-06

Can you even think of a single unique reason to use the free openSUSE over other popular Linux distros?

Zypper and YaST.

I find it the best and easiest to use package management of any open-source OS, along with the RPM back-end of course. It's very easy to vary the dependencies according to which version of the OS you are building for when writing an RPM spec (e.g. Qt 4 vs 5 in my case), which is not so simple when building DEB packages for Ubuntu.

Plus, when you install OpenSUSE, the entire library is available for you to choose from; you don't have to install it from the command-line afterwards. And they're hierarchically organised into categories -- Development, then C++, Python, Ruby, Qt 4, Qt 5, GTK ... not just "Development" as on Debian.

Edited 2018-07-04 16:50 UTC

Reply Score: 3

RE: Zypper
by kurkosdr on Wed 4th Jul 2018 19:09 UTC in reply to "Zypper"
kurkosdr Member since:
2011-04-11

I find it the best and easiest to use package management of any open-source OS, along with the RPM back-end of course. It's very easy to vary the dependencies according to which version of the OS you are building for when writing an RPM spec (e.g. Qt 4 vs 5 in my case), which is not so simple when building DEB packages for Ubuntu.


Sshhh... You risk alienating the Debianfolk and their unsubstantiated claims of .deb being the "true" package manager of FOSSland, and you know how uppity the Debianfolk can get over inconsequential issues such as rivalries between compressed archive formats that can be losslessly converted from one to another.

Edited 2018-07-04 19:16 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Zypper
by cmost on Thu 5th Jul 2018 12:31 UTC in reply to "RE: Zypper"
cmost Member since:
2006-07-16

Haha! I'm a long-time Debian aficionado having used it or one of its offspring for the better part of 10 years. That being said, I have also used RPM based distribution (my favorite by far was PCLinuxOS which was my daily driver for a few years and had the unmitigated gall to use Synptic as the GUI frontend.) I don't think any one package format is superior to another in this day and age of advanced GUI package managers.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Zypper
by grat on Thu 5th Jul 2018 22:09 UTC in reply to "RE: Zypper"
grat Member since:
2006-02-02

Let's clear some common errors up:

.deb is not a package manager.

.deb and .rpm files are packages.

The commands dpkg and rpm are package utilities for those packages.

apt/aptitude, yum and zypper are package managers.

fpm is god's gift to system administrators (thank you Jordan Sissel!!).

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Zypper
by jh27 on Fri 6th Jul 2018 15:32 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Zypper"
jh27 Member since:
2018-07-06

>> The commands dpkg and rpm are package utilities for those packages.

>> apt/aptitude, yum and zypper are package managers.

I would have said it is the other way round dpkg and rpm are the package manager / package management system. Apt and yum are package management utilities or perhaps repository managers.

Reply Score: 1

This will not end well
by shotsman on Thu 5th Jul 2018 06:50 UTC
shotsman
Member since:
2005-07-22

Most VC's are nothing more that debt engines. By that I mean that they buy companies and then a couple of years later they sell and move on with most of the time, the company they leave behind is saddled with debt that is the residue from the asset stripping and cash leeching that the VC's need to do do fund their lavish lifestyle and their next victim.

Good luck SUSE, you are going to need it.

Reply Score: 2

RE: This will not end well
by Cutterman on Thu 5th Jul 2018 17:28 UTC in reply to "This will not end well"
Cutterman Member since:
2006-04-10

I'm afraid I have to agree with you there.

Most VCs just buy-up, monetize and move on. That's why their shareholders pay the CEOs etc., such unbelievable sums.

Fcuk the users, fcuk the developers, fcuk the coders.

Next please!

Mac

Reply Score: 1

RE: This will not end well
by grat on Thu 5th Jul 2018 22:13 UTC in reply to "This will not end well"
grat Member since:
2006-02-02

Most VC's are nothing more that debt engines.

I have the same concern. Some research, though, finds a quote from 2011 (not as recent as I'd like) regarding EQT:

In its 17-year history, the private equity firm has invested in 85 businesses, which under its ownership have increased annual revenue by 12 percent on average and added staff at nearly the same rate.

So there's some hope.

Reply Score: 3

RE: This will not end well
by leech on Sun 8th Jul 2018 16:30 UTC in reply to "This will not end well"
leech Member since:
2006-01-10

Most VC's are nothing more that debt engines. By that I mean that they buy companies and then a couple of years later they sell and move on with most of the time, the company they leave behind is saddled with debt that is the residue from the asset stripping and cash leeching that the VC's need to do do fund their lavish lifestyle and their next victim.

Good luck SUSE, you are going to need it.


Commodore flashback!

Reply Score: 2