Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 5th Apr 2010 22:36 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless Engadget has managed to get hold of a very interesting internal presentation slide from Hewlett-Packard which compares Apple's iPad to HP's very own Slate. Since we didn't yet know anything about the Slate's specifications, this one is pretty revealing. While that's interesting in and of itself, the slide is also interesting in that it illustrates so well what sets Apple apart from companies like HP.
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Comment by lucas_maximus
by lucas_maximus on Mon 5th Apr 2010 22:41 UTC
lucas_maximus
Member since:
2009-08-18

HP Custom UI makes me squirm at the thought.

Edited 2010-04-05 22:42 UTC

Reply Score: 6

RE: Comment by lucas_maximus
by darknexus on Mon 5th Apr 2010 22:44 UTC in reply to "Comment by lucas_maximus"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

HP Custom UI makes me squirm at the thought.


Yeah, especially if they do as bad a job with it as they do with their other software.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Comment by lucas_maximus
by Kroc on Mon 5th Apr 2010 22:50 UTC in reply to "Comment by lucas_maximus"
Kroc Member since:
2005-11-10

Yet more crapware immediately deinstalled to make the thing usable.

There’s nothing different to the same stunt pulled with XP tablets, and look how they fared.

It’s just pathetic. By the time someone (other than Apple) produces a tablet with a good user experience, Apple will have already moved onto the next thing. It’s crazy to think that businesses can mess up their internal structure so much that it completely prevents them from being on the ball, let alone getting near it. HP are suffering the same internal crapfest that made Vista what it was.

Edit - Oh, and check out this piece of junk: http://www.engadget.com/2010/04/05/fusion-garage-joojoo-review/ "The truth is we could go on and on about software flaws" … "The JooJoo's integrated three-cell battery repeatedly lasted 2.5 hours … We will take this moment to non-tactfully remind you that the iPad lasts over 10 hours on a charge.

Edited 2010-04-05 22:54 UTC

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Comment by lucas_maximus
by poundsmack on Mon 5th Apr 2010 23:02 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by lucas_maximus"
poundsmack Member since:
2005-07-13

ummm kroc? you do realize there are prefectly good UI's for pad style computer that came out even before teh iPad right? such as MintPass, and it's successor Sapphire (though that one isn't out yet).

Reply Score: 4

RE[3]: Comment by lucas_maximus
by Kroc on Mon 5th Apr 2010 23:20 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by lucas_maximus"
Kroc Member since:
2005-11-10

I have not heard of these!

It’s HP I’m complaining at, they keep shovelling the same crap and they really should be doing better. If tablets become common, then it’s the iPad I’ll recommend to customers because life is too short to be shortening your life with stressful, badly designed gadgets.

Reply Score: 1

RE[5]: Comment by lucas_maximus
by Kroc on Mon 5th Apr 2010 23:32 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by lucas_maximus"
Kroc Member since:
2005-11-10

http://daringfawnyball.wordpress.com/2010/04/05/expertise/

"While people will tolerate a lot of things, what we want are beautiful things that work well. There aren’t many nonexperts who can accomplish that. Expertise needs schooling, maturation, taste, and quite a lot of attitude."

"Nobody needs to program an iPad to enjoy using it, except those who have no capacity for enjoyment other than programming and complaining about same."

Reply Score: 2

RE[6]: Comment by lucas_maximus
by kragil on Mon 5th Apr 2010 23:51 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by lucas_maximus"
kragil Member since:
2006-01-04

That guy needs a better brain.

"This was the weekend those of us with high standards lost their remaining residue of patience for ideologues who hyperbolize about open systems without actually creating something people want to use."

Yeah, like the internet. People don't want to use that.

Edited 2010-04-05 23:54 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[7]: Comment by lucas_maximus
by testman on Tue 6th Apr 2010 04:29 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by lucas_maximus"
testman Member since:
2007-10-15

His only fault was that he leveled the rant towards the wrong people. The most vocal opponents are the ones who never actually create anything, ever. Ironically, the iPad is probably the ideal device for them.

Yeah, like the internet. People don't want to use that.


Bad comparison; how often do DARPA make a big song and dance about openness and freedom?

As an aside, this whole argument is becoming ridiculously comical. Only politics and religion seem to engender as much polarised debate as the release of an Apple product.

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: Comment by lucas_maximus
by WorknMan on Tue 6th Apr 2010 06:23 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by lucas_maximus"
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13



Yeah, I know what he's saying. My dad was gonna buy and iPad to have a laptop-like device to take with him on trips... you know, just for web browsing, email, and hitting Google maps while traveling. But, once he found out they weren't providing schematics for the circuit boards, he decided to hold off buying one.

Edited 2010-04-06 06:24 UTC

Reply Score: 12

poundsmack Member since:
2005-07-13

ya i am not a huge HP fan either. especially after they destroyed the once amazing Compaq. I won't even get into my ran on how awesome Compaq was and how great their computers were as far as quality and life span, features, price, etc... no no, i won't get into that. and how OpenVMS was doing just fine with Compaq. no... thats a long rant for another time.... and i mean a long rant. anyone here who has read my rants and went, "damn, thats a long rant" then get ready for my Compaq rant some day. it will be song long it will have chapters and people will read it on their kindle and weeks later comment on how long that "book" was....

anyways. ya, hp kinda pisses me off these days. but dell isn't much better (though they are starting to make a comeback). Acer, MSI, and Asus are my favs now (and Fujitsu and Levono, asuming your made of money)

Reply Score: 3

RE[5]: Comment by lucas_maximus
by phoenix on Tue 6th Apr 2010 02:36 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by lucas_maximus"
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

I really hope you're being sarcastic. Otherwise, you are the first person I've ever met (online or otherwise) with anything nice to say about Compaq. After dealing with their Presario line at home and at work (from the 486 to the P4), all I can say is "never buy Compaq".

Reply Score: 2

poundsmack Member since:
2005-07-13

compaq computer lasted forever. their P4 systems were not the best, but no ones were. they were build to last and out of materials that were not intended to be replaced every few years.

Reply Score: 2

RE[7]: Comment by lucas_maximus
by testman on Tue 6th Apr 2010 04:30 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by lucas_maximus"
testman Member since:
2007-10-15

Agreed, some of their products were actually very good.

Reply Score: 2

RE[7]: Comment by lucas_maximus
by phoenix on Tue 6th Apr 2010 04:38 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by lucas_maximus"
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

Not the Presario line, the consumer line. Perhaps the business line was better. But all Presarios were crap, made from crap components that even the lowest bidder wouldn't use. Everything is rebranded as "Compaq" hardware (usually Intel hardware) that won't work with non-Compaq drivers. The motherboards and cases aren't really AT/ATX formfactors. They're just crap.

At work, we've turned down donated Compaqs as they just aren't worth the trouble, even as thin-clients without harddrives.

Edited 2010-04-06 04:40 UTC

Reply Score: 3

Matt Giacomini Member since:
2005-07-06

I really hope you're being sarcastic. Otherwise, you are the first person I've ever met (online or otherwise) with anything nice to say about Compaq.


I was a Novell administrator when the Compaq ProLiant first came out. That server (at the time) was 2x the server in terms of reliability, management tools, and raid performance, of thing even near it's price range.

Compaq made some -very- solid mid range stuff back in the day.

Reply Score: 3

RE[7]: Comment by lucas_maximus
by phoenix on Tue 6th Apr 2010 15:42 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by lucas_maximus"
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

The ProLiant servers were decent.

The Deskpro series of desktops weren't horrible, but weren't great. But the Presario line was pure, unadulterated crap.

Same for Compaq laptops: the consumer ones were absolute crap, some of the business ones were decent.

Reply Score: 2

HP didn't destroy compaq
by osnrdr on Tue 6th Apr 2010 20:41 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by lucas_maximus"
osnrdr Member since:
2010-04-06

You are getting it backward: HP didn't destroy Compaq. Compaq bought HP, using HP's money, and quickly destroyed the company culture. Very clever of them.

Reply Score: 1

RE: HP didn't destroy compaq
by twitterfire on Tue 6th Apr 2010 21:05 UTC in reply to "HP didn't destroy compaq"
twitterfire Member since:
2008-09-11

You are getting it backward: HP didn't destroy Compaq. Compaq bought HP, using HP's money, and quickly destroyed the company culture. Very clever of them.


And I heard that they have a secret team which is designing a new Tablet based on Alpha processors and running Tru64 Unix.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by lucas_maximus
by poundsmack on Tue 6th Apr 2010 16:06 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by lucas_maximus"
poundsmack Member since:
2005-07-13
RE[2]: Comment by lucas_maximus
by puelocesar on Tue 6th Apr 2010 17:31 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by lucas_maximus"
puelocesar Member since:
2008-10-30

That's exactly what I was talking about in the another thread! (http://www.osnews.com/comments/23114)

When any other OS company other the Apple will start doing decent software?

I'm here hoping Google will get it right, but the same way i'm not confortable with Apple's excessive control, I'm not confortable with all my data on a server on the United States..

Reply Score: 1

So basically
by darknexus on Mon 5th Apr 2010 22:49 UTC
darknexus
Member since:
2008-07-15

It's a netbook with no keyboard. Boring. They couldn't even bother to put 2 gb of ram in it? I've used 7 in 1 gb before and, while it does perform ok, it is just ok. Ram is cheap, an extra gig would've been trivial and would've made the user experience so much better. Seriously, aside from the HD-capable video, my Eee netbook is better than this.
At least Apple is offering something different than the competition, think what you will of their philosophy and practices.
I'm still thinking Android will eventually be the winner on tablets, but we'll see.

Reply Score: 3

hmmm
by poundsmack on Mon 5th Apr 2010 22:49 UTC
poundsmack
Member since:
2005-07-13

I remember reading somewhere it would come with Nvidia's Ion 2 (using Optimus for better battery life), guess I was wrong. That's a shame though, would have made it really stand out against the iPad.

Reply Score: 2

More impressive if Nokia released one
by blitze on Mon 5th Apr 2010 23:00 UTC
blitze
Member since:
2006-09-15

Utilising Maemo as their underlying OS.
A decent open platform to work from.

Reply Score: 3

spikeb Member since:
2006-01-18

maemo is dead, long live meego

Reply Score: 2

Haicube Member since:
2005-08-06

Exactly, this is what I thought when reading this from minute 1.

Problem is that Microsoft can't do anything drastic without threatening it's wide spread adoption and the very same is the reason why the slate won't make a huge impact on the market in its current incarnation.

What HP (and other similar PC vendors) needs is balls to make some drastic choices in order to bring a User Experience which boils down to more than a faster CPU. Maemo would definitely be such a choice (Or Meego if you like, it's all the same to me). These are lightweight, competent and consistent. Not to mention that at least from my perspective (and I'm certain from many others as well) it owns iPhoneOS any day of the week.

Now a completely different approach would be to go for Android, but for any slate a real webbrowser is obviously a necessity and here is where Maemo is the real thing. And the other real opp is to run for ChromeOS (is it called that?)

Obviously I can see how HP won't be walking down any of these routes as it might damage their relationship with Microsoft.

Now to finalize this, I'm really not a big fan of the tablet concept today, I'm far to dependent on a real keyboard but as a 6th computer I might have one.

Edited 2010-04-06 05:03 UTC

Reply Score: 2

darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Now a completely different approach would be to go for Android, but for any slate a real webbrowser is obviously a necessity


I'm confused. What's wrong with Android's webkit-based browser?

Reply Score: 2

Haicube Member since:
2005-08-06

I might have to rephrase that, but what I really meant was a full fledged browser in terms of having plugins such as Flash and similar. Maybe Android has this all ready and if so, then brilliant =).

Reply Score: 2

spiderman Member since:
2008-10-23

They've been releasing tablets with Maemo for years and they are pretty good.

And Windows 7 is not perfect but still better than the OS on the iPad. It can play video in any format, it doesn't need iTunes, it can multitask and it can run programs that don't come from Applée's app store.

"But it's the user experience that counts!"

The user experience is crap when you have to convert a movie just to play it. I fail to see what is the point of the iPad. It does everything your iPod does but is bigger and more expensive and it can't do more than that.

Reply Score: 5

Gryzor Member since:
2005-07-03

And Windows 7 is not perfect but still better than the OS on the iPad. It can play video in any format, it doesn't need iTunes, it can multitask and it can run programs that don't come from Applée's app store.

"But it's the user experience that counts!"

The user experience is crap when you have to convert a movie just to play it. I fail to see what is the point of the iPad. It does everything your iPod does but is bigger and more expensive and it can't do more than that.



Yet it can barely get 5 hours of battery life…

Reply Score: 1

twitterfire Member since:
2008-09-11


Yet it can barely get 5 hours of battery life…


Being three times more powerful then iPad, it does a good job consuming only twice more than iPad.

Reply Score: 2

Gryzor Member since:
2005-07-03

"
Yet it can barely get 5 hours of battery life…


Being three times more powerful then iPad, it does a good job consuming only twice more than iPad.
"

It all depends what you want the power for. I have no iPad (nor will have one until it gets a camera and a few other things if ever), but I don’t thing that cheap HP/Win7Trimmed thing is going to do better. For 5 hours of battery life we have Macbooks and some other laptops that run XCode…

To merely CONSUME content, I much rather have battery than “three times more powerful”. (which, this thing is not but it doesn’t matter).

Reply Score: 2

spiderman Member since:
2008-10-23

I thought the guy was talking about the iPod vs the iPad.
Anyway, if you want long battery life, buy an iPod. No real win with the iPad.

Reply Score: 2

darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Isn't the iPad supposed to get up to 10 hours of video? That's double what the iPods get. That being said, supposed and actual battery life can be very different. A friend of mine got an iPad who also has an iPod Touch, and we noticed that while doing simple things like web browsing the iPod Touch drained at about half the rate of the iPad. This suggests that the iPad, while more powerful, isn't as efficient as the iPod Touch which can get at least double the battery life on a much smaller capacity battery. That also suggests Apple's battery estimates may be extremely optimistic at best, unless the video acceleration hardware is more efficient than the CPU. In either case, I'm sticking with my 1005PE. I have an iPhone OS device already (an iPhone 3gs) and don't think I'll buy another one despite some of the conveniences. In particular, I'm getting bit very hard at the moment by the lack of a user-replaceable battery in all of Apple's new lineup; my iPhone battery is draining at 3x the rate it's supposed to and it's not a software problem. I won't even consider an iPad unless they get replaceable batteries and that's not likely to ever happen. No matter how much I like some of the apps, I don't want to get a new device when, on any other device such as those from Nokia, I could just get a new battery for 20 bucks and solve the problem quickly. It's not so convenient anymore.
Ok, done ranting.

Reply Score: 2

Gryzor Member since:
2005-07-03

Apple said that they’ll give you a new unit if the battery was a problem. When it was a problem.

The service is 105 U$S.

http://www.apple.com/support/ipad/service/battery/

Reply Score: 2

Gryzor Member since:
2005-07-03

I thought the guy was talking about the iPod vs the iPad.

The guy was talking about the Win7 HP tablet vs the iPad.


Anyway, if you want long battery life, buy an iPod. No real win with the iPad.


Wait… I thought that one of the biggest “complains” about the iPhone/Touch was that for certain tasks, it was a “pity” that the screen was too small. The iPad brings a bigger screen. Do you seriously think there’s no “real win” ? Have you played with one?

Reply Score: 2

The Problem With Tablets
by segedunum on Mon 5th Apr 2010 23:56 UTC
segedunum
Member since:
2005-07-06

The problem with tablets is that they have needed an OS and applications specifically built to take advantage of the device and make life easier for those using them. Windows based tablets have never done that. The iPad has at least gone some way to rectifying that, but I'm still sceptical how successful this whole tablet thing really is.

Reply Score: 7

RE: The Problem With Tablets
by Tuishimi on Tue 6th Apr 2010 00:14 UTC in reply to "The Problem With Tablets"
Tuishimi Member since:
2005-07-06

I don't know how successful they will be, but I got to play with my friend's shiny new iPad and it was... well... fun. Oh, and the virtual keyboard is quite usable.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: The Problem With Tablets
by darknexus on Tue 6th Apr 2010 00:20 UTC in reply to "RE: The Problem With Tablets"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

I don't know how successful they will be, but I got to play with my friend's shiny new iPad and it was... well... fun. Oh, and the virtual keyboard is quite usable.


Playing with a new gadget is almost always fun. And a virtual keyboard is no fun if one is used to touch typing. Anyone tried pairing a BT keyboard to an iPad yet? Supposedly you can, unlike the iPhone which *should* be able to use BT keyboards but cannot. Apple's iPad keyboard isn't out yet and, knowing Apple, they'll charge double what a decent BT keyboard would cost.

Reply Score: 2

Eddyspeeder Member since:
2006-05-10

Two reasons why I'm not that worried about typing:

(a) Touch typing may be something you are used to, but we can adapt VERY easily to other forms of input, even when touch feedback lacks. Our motor processor is very capable of adapting to different context.
An example of this from the field of sequence learning (a subfield of cognitive psychology) can be found in J. K. Witt, J. Ashe, & D. T. Willingham (2008). An egocentric frame of reference in implicit motor sequence learning. Psychological Research, 72(5), 542-552.

(b) Apple has so far proven to be very capable of creating keyboards (both tactile and digital) that are very ergonomically designed, that is, designed with the user in mind. As I said in my http://www.osnews.com/story/22296/Review_MacBook_Pro_13_">MacBo... , everyone touching the keyboard remarks how easily typing can be done. Equally so, I'm amazed at how well (and how flawless) I can type on friends' iPhones. That is why I never worried they were able to pull off the same thing for the iPad.

One thing I will put up for discussion is the "landscape vs. portrait" keyboards. I've already read reviews that some people had a blast typing in landscape (as it hardly differs in size from a standard keyboard) but that it's quite difficult in portrait mode. To return to #1, two variables are introduced in the context to "normal typing", namely that the tactile feedback disappears AND that the keys are spaced closer together. No wonder it becomes more difficult then.

But I'm sure that we will soon see several comments appearing online that after several weeks of typing, people have found no problem typing blindly on their iPad, as they do on a standard keyboard. Maybe they don't even want to go back, like I hate working with mice now I'm used to a multitouch trackpad.

EDIT: Turns out OSNews links don't like quotation marks in the text between < a > and < /a >.

[i]Edited 2010-04-06 01:43 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: The Problem With Tablets
by darknexus on Tue 6th Apr 2010 02:07 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: The Problem With Tablets"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

I wasn't referring to feedback, but the fact that virtual keyboards often change. A keyboard in one iPhone app can have different symbols than another app. Hopefully this won't be as much of an issue on the iPad due to its size, but on the iPhone it means you cannot type completely blind unless you remember exactly where each symbol is in each app. Compare, for example, the address field in Safari vs the email address field in Mail. I'm hoping the iPad will not have different keyboards for each app but rather just display a full keyboard appropriate for the currently selected language input. I'd love to try one, unfortunately I'm about 2.5 hours away from the nearest Apple store and am not going to plunk down at least $500 on the iPad without trying it myself first.

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: The Problem With Tablets
by Tuishimi on Tue 6th Apr 2010 02:56 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: The Problem With Tablets"
Tuishimi Member since:
2005-07-06

Another parent at our Den meeting (son is in scouts) had one and was planning on trying to pair with a bluetooth keyboard he has at home, tonight.

Reply Score: 2

RE: The Problem With Tablets
by Morty on Tue 6th Apr 2010 11:24 UTC in reply to "The Problem With Tablets"
Morty Member since:
2005-07-06

There has been two big problems with tablets that are the main reasons for the absence of the success of the form factor, but neither are the OS and tailoring of it.

Those two problems are price and screen size.

First the tablets have always been way more expensive than comparative laptops, and most people don't pay more for a computer that can do less than a cheaper more power-full device. Simple as that. And HP repeats the mistake with this tablet, It's basically netbook hardware, and most people don't spend 549 EUR on a netbook.

The other ting with tablets are screen size, 5-7" tablets are simply toys. Those tiny screens are not much better than that of your smartphone, hence most people don't care and use their phones instead. To make an impact a screen with decent resolution and size of 10-13" is needed. Unfortunately the common netbook screens with WSVGA (1024×600) is not a good solution, 600 is to low(perhaps the iPads non widescreen solution is a good compromise to get decent resolution).

Reply Score: 4

Additional specs
by Eddyspeeder on Tue 6th Apr 2010 01:31 UTC
Eddyspeeder
Member since:
2006-05-10

Even though Thom insists that individual points are not that relevant in the whole iPad vs. [other_tablet] discussion, I myself do appreciate having actual specs to get a complete picture.

The iPad specs were provided on the day of the Keynote: http://www.apple.com/ipad/specs/

But, as the HP comparison points out, we don't know about RAM or graphics on the iPad.

Actually... we do.

RAM
HP is in favor when it comes to RAM, having 1 GB in their slate as opposed to the iPads 512 MB. See http://www.padgadget.com/2010/04/05/ipad-dissasembly-reveals-intere...

Graphics
The ARM Mali 50 (part of the A4 chip) has graphics for 1080p playback just as the Intel UMA. See http://www.osnews.com/thread?406570

Camera
Engadget themselves already assumed that the iPad 2 will contain a camera, considering that the iPad SDK reaveals portions of it. See http://www.engadget.com/2010/03/10/ipad-sdk-3-2-beta-4-squashes-rum...

In conclusion
As a cognitive ergonomist, I consider tech specs the means to an end, namely that of a proper user experience. So after all is said and done, I must concur - look at usability and hardware-interface integration.

I may hope that HP has made a touch-ORIENTED interface, rather than a touch-optimized interface (which could still be a standard keyboard&mouse input interface with touch manipulation enabled). If they indeed have done so, then I'm sure they have a worthy opponent for the iPad. Props to their product developers!

Reply Score: 0

SSD and Windows 7
by Earl Colby pottinger on Tue 6th Apr 2010 02:40 UTC
Earl Colby pottinger
Member since:
2005-07-06

I has a Toshiba NB205 with almost same specs.

Windows 7 was a dog on this system, I wiped the hard drive and installed Haiku-OS, and the system runs fine.

Wait, there`s more. I later installed an Intel 80GB-25M SSD, Haiku-OS maybe at most doubled in access speed. Windows 7, a whole new ball game. It must be at-least 5-8 time faster in boots, programs load in a snap, and general file access is not longer a waiting game.

NEAR ZERO LATENCY MAKES A HUGE DIFFERENCE FOR WINDOWS 7.

Since this tablet also includes a flash drive I expect this tablets to run fine.

Reply Score: 2

RE: SSD and Windows 7
by darknexus on Tue 6th Apr 2010 02:53 UTC in reply to "SSD and Windows 7"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

I suspect that would depend on how many apps you have running, and whether they used good SSDs or cheapo ones. Fast file access helps a great deal, but it won't help much if you open more programs than you have memory. In that case, the faster flash might help the swapping performance but at the cost of seriously degrading the flash storage faster than an hd equivalent. Like everything else, it depends on what you run and how Windows is set up by default. Having dealt with HP before my confidence isn't high that they'll do a great job with that. HP has great servers, but their default desktop setup is lackluster at best. Can't wait to see what their custom UI is going to be, I hope they do a better job with it than they do with their other software. Still, how will a custom UI compensate when a program you wish to run simply has no touch optimization at all? The operating system is only one part of the experience, after all.

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: SSD and Windows 7
by Earl Colby pottinger on Tue 6th Apr 2010 13:06 UTC in reply to "RE: SSD and Windows 7"
Earl Colby pottinger Member since:
2005-07-06

Well, I don't use Windows much, only for encrypted wireless. 90% or more of my time is spent in Haiku-OS and that is fast on this system.

This suggests to me that for certain tasks putting another OS on the machine would be worth while.

With usable USB ports, small mice/keyboards will make it work as a net-book, then with even a simple mouse driver to make the screen act like a track-pad simple browsing or viewing the contents of files a snap.

Reply Score: 2

RE: SSD and Windows 7
by Tuishimi on Tue 6th Apr 2010 02:58 UTC in reply to "SSD and Windows 7"
Tuishimi Member since:
2005-07-06

Whoa wait! Haiku works fine on the NB205?!? Network? Sound? If this is true, I know what I am doing tonight!

Reply Score: 2

RE[2]: SSD and Windows 7
by Earl Colby pottinger on Tue 6th Apr 2010 13:00 UTC in reply to "RE: SSD and Windows 7"
Earl Colby pottinger Member since:
2005-07-06

Wireless now works, Ethernet requires the patch I have posted on Haikuware. Sound only comes from the internal speakers, I still can't get the out-jacks to work.

The video port is great, when at home I run on an external monitor at 1280 by 1024. And battery life is over eight hours in Haiku, I think the longest I have ran it was 8:45 when I first got it. My optical mouse seems to use a lot of power, I lost about an hour's life when using it.

And check out webpositive.

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: SSD and Windows 7
by Tuishimi on Tue 6th Apr 2010 14:38 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: SSD and Windows 7"
Tuishimi Member since:
2005-07-06

Trackpad? Does it work?

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: SSD and Windows 7
by Earl Colby pottinger on Wed 7th Apr 2010 09:25 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: SSD and Windows 7"
Earl Colby pottinger Member since:
2005-07-06

The trackpad works fine. It is what I use when away from the monitor/keyboard/mouse setup in my room.


That is why I think even if all you do is get the tablet's screen to act like a trackpad (option in BIOS?) then it would become usable for most free OSs out there.

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: SSD and Windows 7
by Tuishimi on Wed 7th Apr 2010 14:57 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: SSD and Windows 7"
Tuishimi Member since:
2005-07-06

Can't get my wireless to work. It recognizes it, but no DHCP...

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: SSD and Windows 7
by Tuishimi on Wed 7th Apr 2010 15:31 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: SSD and Windows 7"
Tuishimi Member since:
2005-07-06

Ah! Oh well.

To connect to a WLAN make sure that it is an unprotected (no WPE, WPA, WPA2) one that doesn't need a password for login.

I'll try installing the plugged in network driver and go with that.

Reply Score: 2

N Wifi
by daveak on Tue 6th Apr 2010 06:52 UTC
daveak
Member since:
2008-12-29

only G and not N on the Slate? That seems strange.

Reply Score: 1

Aargh! Not 600EUR! 600USD!
by shawnjgoff on Tue 6th Apr 2010 11:47 UTC
shawnjgoff
Member since:
2008-05-02

EUR vs. USD is a huge difference. It's $550 - $600 USD!

Reply Score: 1

Boot time for HP's tablet?
by axilmar on Tue 6th Apr 2010 12:26 UTC
axilmar
Member since:
2006-03-20

If it uses Windows 7, its boot time will probably be hundreds of seconds, which is not good for a Tablet computer.

I want a tablet so as that I can read the morning news while drinking my coffee in the morning...or when I am in the kitchen and want to check out a recipie...or when I watch a movie and I want to check out some facts about the actors. As it is right now, none of the tablets work for me: those running Windows 7 are slow and cumbersome to use, while the iPad does not support Flash.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Boot time for HP's tablet?
by vaette on Tue 6th Apr 2010 12:35 UTC in reply to "Boot time for HP's tablet?"
vaette Member since:
2008-08-09

Don't turn it off. S3 sleep is the only way to live.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Boot time for HP's tablet?
by allisonaaronb on Tue 6th Apr 2010 12:37 UTC in reply to "Boot time for HP's tablet?"
allisonaaronb Member since:
2010-03-30

I agree. I think this where something like the Ubuntu Remix would shine. Man Apple has it figured out with the full package. App Store & unified interface.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Boot time for HP's tablet?
by spiderman on Tue 6th Apr 2010 12:42 UTC in reply to "Boot time for HP's tablet?"
spiderman Member since:
2008-10-23

Buy a tablet with Maemo or some other linux customized. There are many of them out there.

Reply Score: 2

I am amazed...
by Evan on Tue 6th Apr 2010 21:00 UTC
Evan
Member since:
2006-01-18

that HP will even sell this device.

1024x600 is the most useless display resolution ever. 5 hours of battery life is a joke nowadays, and it uses a full OS but only G networking.

This will be a flop. Then again, what HP product hasn't been crap since Carly took it over and destroyed the HP Way.

Reply Score: 1

RE: I am amazed...
by vaette on Wed 7th Apr 2010 10:31 UTC in reply to "I am amazed..."
vaette Member since:
2008-08-09

Hahaha, I thought you were serious at first, but I finally got it at "only G networking". Like you feel so constrained by having only 54 Mb/s on a surfing tablet.

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: I am amazed...
by Evan on Wed 7th Apr 2010 20:32 UTC in reply to "RE: I am amazed..."
Evan Member since:
2006-01-18

Wireless G halves the bandwidth for every client connected. 54mbps is theoretical.

The best I have gotten is around 27~ Add another client and it becomes 13, another and 6.5. That is under ideal conditions.

But you are right... Wireless G isn't the problem... it can't do anything due to processor and display resolution anyway.

Reply Score: 1

tablets tablets tablets
by jimmystewpot on Thu 8th Apr 2010 07:42 UTC
jimmystewpot
Member since:
2006-01-19

Tablets are all hype at the moment.. the ipad is a preliminary product purely aimed at suckers... anyone of those 300,000 people who purchased one have essentially bought into an already obsolete product simply by the fact that it doesn't have a front facing camera and all the other parts that users expected would be included. So in 12 months when the new version comes out the same hype will be done but the competition from android and meegoo will be all over the place... I see these atom processor based systems as an intel buy in rather than a great product.. I mean 4 hours battery life? wtf.. probably actually end up being more like 2.5-3 if we go by what HP normally states for their laptops.. "9 cell battery 12 hours.." bought it.. more like "9 cell battery 8 hours"..

I can see a load of room for improvement and I really hope that there is more competition on alternative architectures.. we really need more competition in the processor market simply to keep intel 'nice'...

Reply Score: 1