Linked by David Adams on Thu 26th Jan 2012 00:06 UTC, submitted by estherschindler
Windows Microsoft is giving an unusually long advanced look at their next edition of Windows 8, both for client and server, and Tom Henderson (who has been writing about networking and security for decades) takes a look at the implications of the features in the "pre-beta" tuned for businesses and network admins. The client version of the operating systems is known to have support concerns, for instance, as long-time APIs are retired and new ones introduced, as he writes in Windows 8 Client Pre-Beta: Five Important Implications. And the Windows 8 Server Editions promise more radical changes than the operating system has seen in a decade: It’s a re-thinking of how server roles are accomplished for Microsoft. He discusses the impact on your Windows Server deployment in Windows 8 Server Pre-Beta: 5 Important Implications.
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Bah
by Alfman on Thu 26th Jan 2012 04:18 UTC
Alfman
Member since:
2011-01-28

Both articles are plenty wordy with hype, but void of the meaty details.

Powershell is great, I'm glad they've gotten on board with a real scripting interface for windows. But what if anything will change with win8 from previous powershells?

MS office metadata & compliance features...ok...but what does it mean in terms of server administration? Is this an attempt at shifting the security policy burden from IT to the office users? Need more information.

It's great that window server will have built in virtual servers with isolated networking, but is anything new for actual data center operators, or is it pretty much how they already do virtual windows servers?

Advanced Networking like ipv6 and dnssec, awsome, but what's improved since win7?


Admittedly this is more of a criticism of the article than win8 per say, but for all the emphasis on "Windows 8 is different and Windows 8 Server editions, are still more different." I think the author completely failed to follow through. It would have been preferable to pick any one of those and dig up the details than to cover all of them so poorly.

Reply Score: 4

RE: Bah
by n4cer on Thu 26th Jan 2012 21:18 UTC in reply to "Bah"
n4cer Member since:
2005-07-06

Half the time, the author doesn't even use the proper product terminology (What the heck is Windows 8 Mobile?), and unless he has some special build access,

"Windows Metro, available for download on Windows 7 as a preview now..."

is simply not true.

It may take more time than reading the articles, but you'll definitely have a better understanding of what's new by watching the BUILD sessions(There's always Ctrl+Shift+G / Ctrl+Shift+N if viewed in Windows Media Player to watch at 1.4x speed -- alternatively, there's
http://blogs.technet.com/b/windowsserver/
http://blogs.msdn.com/b/b8/ ).
There's also a guide for Windows 8 Developer Preview, but it doesn't contain everything, and is a light overview of the platform ( http://download.microsoft.com/download/1/E/4/1E455D53-C382-4A39-BA7... ).

These are some of the highlights
*PS indicates sessions containing PowerShell info, but other sessions may include feature-specific management info:

Running Windows from an external USB drive with Windows To Go
http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/BUILD/BUILD2011/HW-245T

Remote desktop experience in Windows 8
http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/BUILD/BUILD2011/SAC-642T

Platform storage evolved
http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/BUILD/BUILD2011/SAC-474T

Windows Server 8 *PS
http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/BUILD/BUILD2011/SAC-973F

Manage a highly-efficient environment at scale using the Windows Management Framework (WMF) *PS
http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/BUILD/BUILD2011/SAC-646T

Designing systems for continuous availability and scalability
http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/BUILD/BUILD2011/SAC-446T

Building continuously available systems with Hyper-V
http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/BUILD/BUILD2011/SAC-451T

These last two are taken from larger keynotes.

Windows 8 as a professional platform (see full keynote for consumer features)
http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/BUILD/BUILD2011/KEY-0001#time=1h32m...

Windows Server 8 Storage, Networking, Virtualization Overview (see full keynote for Server and Tools info)
http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/BUILD/BUILD2011/KEY-0002#time=46m32...


And here are the sessions discussing Dynamic Access Control (Compliance - scroll to the bottom)
http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/BUILD/BUILD2011?t=compliance

Edited 2012-01-26 21:23 UTC

Reply Score: 4

RE[2]: Bah
by Alfman on Thu 26th Jan 2012 23:13 UTC in reply to "RE: Bah"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

n4cer,

Thanks for providing links to the missing details! Unfortunately I cannot get any of the silverlight video or alternative links working from linux, however I found the attached slideshows very informative.


Focusing on just one: Windows USB Booting - this could be a very useful feature now that it's officially supported. I've tried BartPE slipstreams, but this looks a lot better. We'll need to wait and see how well it works in actuality, but it appears to be a genuinely useful new feature for windows. Bravo.

http://view.officeapps.live.com/op/view.aspx?src=http%3a%2f...

Reply Score: 2

RE[3]: Bah
by n4cer on Fri 27th Jan 2012 02:08 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Bah"
n4cer Member since:
2005-07-06

You're welcome.
Does the mp4 link not work?
Example: http://video.ch9.ms/build/2011/mp4/245.mp4

If not, try clicking the Format button at the bottom-right of the video on the session page. There's an HTML5 option that implies WebM support.


HTML5
For browsers that support h264 MP4 or WebM video playback such as:
IE9+, Chrome 5+, or Safari 4+.


I meant to post this earlier RE: PowerShell v3
This isn't everything -- just what I remember.
http://blogs.msdn.com/b/powershell/
will have more info as PowerShell nears RTW.
Also, a new Windows 8 build will be available in late Febrary.

With Windows 8, Server Core becomes the recommended installation for Windows Server, and unlike prior versions, you can move between Core and full Server (i.e., with GUI) without having to perform a new installation.

Command Prompt (or optionally PowerShell) may be run on the server locally for setup and management (and, of course, remotely -- there are also GUI tools for remote management).

As a result, there are a lot more system management cmdlets in Windows 8.

PowerShell v3 runs on the Dynamic Language Runtime, can JIT scripts (6x perf gain mentioned).

WS-Management becomes the default remoting protocol (DCOM maintained for downlevel clients).

PowerShell gets async support, new async Common Information Model API, and a workflow engine.

WS-Man and CIM also for interop with non-Windows clients.

cmdlets for REST web services support (e.g., Invoke-WebRequest, Invoke-RestMethod, as New-WebServiceProxy was for SOAP services in v2).
http://www.dougfinke.com/blog/index.php/2011/10/22/powershell-handl...

http://rambletech.wordpress.com/2011/09/21/windows-powershell-v3-in...

http://get-powershell.com/post/2011/09/18/A-new-PowerShell-V3-Cmdle...


OData as the protocol of exposing management web services
http://archive.msdn.microsoft.com/mgmtODataWebServ

Durable remoting sessions (e.g., can survive a reboot of the client machines).

Edited 2012-01-27 02:25 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE[4]: Bah
by Alfman on Fri 27th Jan 2012 18:06 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Bah"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

n4cer,

"Does the mp4 link not work?"
"If not, try clicking the Format button at the bottom-right of the video on the session page. There's an HTML5 option that implies WebM support."

No actually nothing seems to work. "html5" browser streaming does work without a hitch from other sites so I always thought it was microsoft blocking linux clients, but I haven't taken the time to snoop the HTTP traffic so I couldn't be sure. Anyways, I find if I download the files first they play locally.

I'm curious what is it you do? Is keeping track of new windows developments part of your job or just a hobby?

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: Bah
by n4cer on Sat 28th Jan 2012 03:33 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Bah"
n4cer Member since:
2005-07-06


No actually nothing seems to work. "html5" browser streaming does work without a hitch from other sites so I always thought it was microsoft blocking linux clients, but I haven't taken the time to snoop the HTTP traffic so I couldn't be sure. Anyways, I find if I download the files first they play locally.


Hmm. The only Linux I have ATM is an AVLinux LiveCD I've yet to try. What distro/browser are you using?


I'm curious what is it you do? Is keeping track of new windows developments part of your job or just a hobby?


Given the company I work for still has XP deployed (mixed deployment of mostly PCs, some Macs), keeping track of new Windows developments is more or less a hobby. :-) :'(

I'm one of maybe 3 people running Windows 7 on their workstations (a carryover from being part of the IT staff when I started there -- I still am when needed). I'm regarded as the resident Windows/Microsoft guy, but am regularly asked about all kinds of software and device-related questions (mostly for troubleshooting).

My current position is "Web Developer" in our ePub group, but I also do rich client apps when needed, and actually prefer them. Code is mostly C#, ASP.NET, the odd PowerShell script (it'd be great if I could use it in the browser -- moreover I want the runtime in the browser), rarely (thankfully) some awful C++ Builder 6 project I hope to some day replace with a web service backend and platform-tailored rich client front ends (it's an offline reader companion to a website that can sync its local DB from CDs or the Net).

Computing in general was a hobby long before it became job-related. My first computer was a TI 99/4a (I was 3 -- still have it). I also had a Commodore ADAM at some point. From then on, it's been x86 hardware, starting with an 8086/88 clone -- I don't remember the brand. Have used other systems in personal and work situations, but didn't own them (maybe my HP TouchPad counts since WebOS was almost a PC OS).

Excluding devices, the ADAM was the last non-x86 computer I've owned. I've mainly gravitated towards Microsoft platforms because they've been a good fit for me overall versus others. I've participated in technical beta programs for various companies (mainly MS) since around 1997. Windows 98SE was my first OS beta. I would've gotten a DEC Alpha if Windows 2000 for that platform wasn't killed in the RC stage after Compaq acquired DEC (settled for a P II 400). I expect to get at least one ARM-based PC once Windows 8 ships, but my main computer will still be x86(64) until there's a compatible ARM system enables me to run x86 virtual machines -- though possibly not even then.

TL;DR -- hobby first, job second.

Reply Score: 2

RE[6]: Bah
by Alfman on Sat 28th Jan 2012 10:03 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Bah"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

n4cer,

"What distro/browser are you using?"

Mint12,FF

"Given the company I work for still has XP deployed (mixed deployment of mostly PCs, some Macs), keeping track of new Windows developments is more or less a hobby. :-) :'("

Yea, I'm not sure there's a compelling case for the newer windows in business. If ever they kill outlook/office in winxp, then alot of them would upgrade in a hurry!


"Computing in general was a hobby long before it became job-related."

As it is with all geeks.

"I've mainly gravitated towards Microsoft platforms because they've been a good fit for me overall versus others."

Interestingly, I've gravitated away. I really did/do like developing in .net languages. I was working on some windows file system drivers some years back when windows was still my platform. The win kernel was/is cleaner than linux in my opinion and I was working on some fairly innovative ideas. However as MS began prohibiting users installing custom/independent drivers into the kernel, and revoking the signing keys for tools designed to unlock the kernel on a user's behalf, I became repulsed by their behavior. I simply couldn't turn a blind eye. I have to say, the race towards closed computing in userspace by apple, microsoft, and others is not something I anticipated at all, it's happening so quickly.

Philosophic disagreements aside, I think microsoft is doing alot of cool things. I'd love to get my hands on a "surface" platform. Also I often wish I'd get the chance to work on the kinds of projects they work on at MS research labs.

Reply Score: 2

RE[7]: Bah
by n4cer on Sun 29th Jan 2012 03:46 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Bah"
n4cer Member since:
2005-07-06

Indeed, we agree on .NET, Surface, and MSR.

RE: Firefox on Mint 12

The BUILD videos are only available in WMV and h.264. The h.264 version is used in the HTML5 player, but Firefox doesn't support h.264 for HTML5.

The videos do work in Chrome (at least until Google removes h.264 support, if they still plan to do that).

The latest Channel9 videos have added WebM as an available format, so those do work in Firefox.

I also tested Moonlight (binary download), and it works in Chrome, enabling me to choose Smooth Streaming or Progressive from the Formats button and have it play in the Silverlight player rather than HTML5. Unfortunately, Firefox blocked Moonlight, saying it wasn't compatible with FF 9.01.

Reply Score: 2

Changes, yes... but how much Benefit?
by kateline on Thu 26th Jan 2012 19:51 UTC
kateline
Member since:
2011-05-19

Always so many changes from Microsoft to Windows. But how much benefit for the customer? I'm glad I don't have to support this crap.

As the one article concludes: "The usual groans that accompany a Windows version rollout aren’t going to get any quieter."

I can't believe so many corporations still meekly accept such treatment. Especially these days when there are good mature alternatives from Linux, Apple, etc. It reminds me of how IT suffered with the IBM mainframe monopoly for so many years before they finally woke up. I don't think they'll wake up to their abuse from Microsoft until their end users finally shove it right in their face with all their Android and Apple handhelds.

Reply Score: 2

Comment by Soulbender
by Soulbender on Fri 27th Jan 2012 04:28 UTC
Soulbender
Member since:
2005-08-18

Lots of words but little of value being said. The author doesn't have much grasp on technology either, it seems:

The drill, familiar for Unix/Linux/Solaris admins, becomes editing and cutting-and-pasting information into activities


What? Pasting into activities? What does that even mean?

It also means that feedback based on what you just did with a PowerShell script doesn’t come as quickly to the administrator executing the script


Huh? There's no feedback from the scripts? That's news to me.

advanced IP address management


And this is what, exactly?

In the case of those using implementations of VMware or XenServer, each of those vendors has data switch partners that implement things like DNSSec, VLANs, IPv6 controls, and even IP address management.


Uhm, no. VMWare and Xen supports VLAN's natively. In fact, Windows Server is the only server OS I have ever used that can not do VLAN tagging without 3rd party drivers. As for the other things; DNSSec has nothing to do with virtualization and what "IPv6 controls" and "IP address management" actually mean in this context is anyone's guess.

The impression I come away with is "This guy don't know jack about Windows, virtualization or networking".
Windows 8 might have interesting stuff but there's no way to figure out what that is from this article.

Edited 2012-01-27 04:35 UTC

Reply Score: 2