Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 2nd Apr 2015 09:31 UTC, submitted by Intelec
General Unix

We missed this earlier this year, but Coherent has been released as open source. Coherent is a UNIX clone originally developed for the PDP-11, but later ported to a number of other platforms, including the IBM PC. It was developed by the Mark Williams Company, and despite an official investigation by AT&T, no signs of copied code were ever found.

Mark Williams Company closed in 1995. In 2001, Bob Swartz asked me to archive the hard disks containing the Mark Williams source repository; the command and system sources here are from that repository. I have long intended to catalog and organize these sources, but in the meantime they are posted here as is. MWC's documentation guru Fred Butzen provided the MWC documentation sources.

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Comment by ddc_
by ddc_ on Thu 2nd Apr 2015 11:08 UTC
ddc_
Member since:
2006-12-05

And it is 3-clause BSD license, so most projects can freely reuse the code. Not sure whether the code is worth reuse though.

Reply Score: 2

Ugh
by Drunkula on Thu 2nd Apr 2015 12:14 UTC
Drunkula
Member since:
2009-09-03

What a painful website to look at. Oh well. Thanks for the browsers view no style option.

Reply Score: 5

Comment by motang
by motang on Thu 2nd Apr 2015 13:12 UTC
motang
Member since:
2008-03-27

If I remember correctly Bob Swartz is the father of Aaron Swartz.

Reply Score: 3

Never heard
by General_Edmund_Duke on Thu 2nd Apr 2015 13:15 UTC
General_Edmund_Duke
Member since:
2014-05-17

I never heard about that system. Cool thing. Maybe someone will pick up sources and give this a new life? However there so many UNIX clones, that chances aren`t high for that.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Never heard
by No it isnt on Thu 2nd Apr 2015 14:08 UTC in reply to "Never heard"
No it isnt Member since:
2005-11-14

A unix that hasn't been developed in 20 years? It's a museum piece.

Reply Score: 5

RE: Never heard
by windowshasyou on Thu 2nd Apr 2015 15:21 UTC in reply to "Never heard"
windowshasyou Member since:
2011-05-14

Downloading the source now. It'll give me something to do and maybe something worthwhile will come of it.

Reply Score: 1

Comment by neticspace
by neticspace on Thu 2nd Apr 2015 15:00 UTC
neticspace
Member since:
2009-06-09

What are the functional Unix systems as of 2015?

Reply Score: 2

RE: Comment by neticspace
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Thu 2nd Apr 2015 16:25 UTC in reply to "Comment by neticspace"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

AIX
HP-UX
Solaris
Mac OS X

That's about it, I think.

By function, I would mean one that companies still rely on for mission critical tasks that I wouldn't make fun of for doing so.

My old company still has a HP-UX system running their in house inventory. No connectivity to any other system. I would make fun of them for that, but I was part of the sourcing for a replacement. After getting a few multi-million quotes for a replacement, I totally understand why they're willing to stick with it and pay absurd amounts for replacement parts.

Reply Score: 3

RE[2]: Comment by neticspace
by tankist on Thu 2nd Apr 2015 18:07 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by neticspace"
tankist Member since:
2007-01-19

What about BSDs? For example, Netflix relies on FreeBSD.

Reply Score: 2

Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

Well, I was thinking proprietary UNIX's that comply with the single UNIX specification:

http://www.opengroup.org/openbrand/register/


BSD's are unix but they aren't UNIXⓇ.

Reply Score: 3

RE[3]: Comment by neticspace
by Flatland_Spider on Thu 2nd Apr 2015 20:02 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by neticspace"
Flatland_Spider Member since:
2006-09-01

They're Unix-like. They probably would pass the test, but no one wants to spend the money to get certified.

Reply Score: 2

Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

Yeah, unless you have some crazy mission critical legacy application that needs to run on UNIX, FreeBSD isn't a bad choice most of the time.

I hadn't heard Netflix was all FreeBSD'd up. any articles to that point? I'd be interested to learn what they see in it today. I'm an old FreeBSD 4.0 guy myself. I had to switch to Linux, due to wide gaps in performance for common applications. Hopefully that's much less these days.

Reply Score: 3

RE[5]: Comment by neticspace
by laffer1 on Fri 3rd Apr 2015 19:37 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by neticspace"
laffer1 Member since:
2007-11-09

There have been several presentations on FreeBSD use at netflix. There are also some podcats like this one http://bsdtalk.blogspot.com/2013/05/bsdtalk226-freebsd-and-netflix....

I think previous bsdcan presentations have covered it also.

Reply Score: 2

RE[5]: Comment by neticspace
by Soulbender on Sat 4th Apr 2015 03:23 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by neticspace"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

The BSD's performs just as well, if not better, than Linux in server tasks.

Reply Score: 1

Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

They did at one point for server applications I needed, then they did not. Its kind of impossible to say something like that in general.

Reply Score: 3

RE[7]: Comment by neticspace
by Soulbender on Sat 4th Apr 2015 10:46 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by neticspace"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

Its kind of impossible to say something like that in general.


Actually, it's perfectly possible to say that in general the are of similar performance, the differences are only in some programs.

I also noted I got downvoted. Sorry, forgot we are not allowed to criticize the almighty Linux.

Edited 2015-04-04 10:47 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE[7]: Comment by neticspace
by tidux on Tue 7th Apr 2015 18:49 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by neticspace"
tidux Member since:
2011-08-13

They did at one point for server applications I needed, then they did not. Its kind of impossible to say something like that in general.


In this case we do know why. It was due to FreeBSD's horrible initial attempts at SMP, and are what lead to the DragonFly BSD fork. Right now FreeBSD and Linux both perform very well for server tasks.

Edited 2015-04-07 18:50 UTC

Reply Score: 2

Exciting
by whartung on Thu 2nd Apr 2015 16:54 UTC
whartung
Member since:
2005-07-06

Here we have a copy of an entire system that can be made self-hosted.

They have the essentials of a basic UNIX-ish system, including, notably, a C compiler.

It's approachable, simply due to its small size. It's interesting in that it's a commercial system, rather than academic.

It even has a modicum of history, since these are disk dumps of systems that use version control (RCS). So that's interesting too.

It would be curious to compare this system, with other UNIX systems of the era, simply to contrast their approaches. In THEORY, this is a "clean room" implementation. It would be interesting now to see how clean that room really was.

It should be of interest to anyone curious about implementation of operating systems, not simply at the kernel level, but the entire eco-system. It'll be familiar, yet new at the same time.

Reply Score: 3

Was hoping for a coherent unix clone but...
by sobkas on Thu 2nd Apr 2015 17:03 UTC
sobkas
Member since:
2005-12-13

all I got is the "Coherent" unix clone.

Reply Score: 5

How does Coherent compare with Minix?
by MacMan on Fri 3rd Apr 2015 02:00 UTC
MacMan
Member since:
2006-11-19

I've only had a very quick look at the Coherent src, but it seems like the Minix src is lot cleaner and easier to follow. Plus, Minix supports SMP, threading, networking, virtual memory, etc... and Minix is tiny.

Reply Score: 3

Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

I'm not sure what you expected from an OS that has not seen any development for 20 years.

Reply Score: 2

Comment by hackus
by hackus on Fri 3rd Apr 2015 04:00 UTC
hackus
Member since:
2006-06-28

I hope everyone here knows Swartz was Aaron's father.

Reply Score: 3

Time Capsule
by Intelec on Fri 3rd Apr 2015 04:10 UTC
Intelec
Member since:
2015-03-31

Coherent, right now it is like a gift from the past, unclosed from a Time Capsule. So it does not matter if has the same features that today Unix clones.
If you want a modern Unix install Linux or Freebsd.

Reply Score: 2